Russell Wiley

Russell Wiley

Retired from the Department of Chemistry
University of Northern Iowa
Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0423

E-mail: Russell.Wiley@uni.edu

Degrees

  • B.A., 1963, University of Northern Iowa
  • M.A., 1968, University of Northern Iowa.

Research Interests

My interests are in the areas of Environmental Chemistry and Chemistry Education.

In collaboration with Dr. Bartak, we have recently began a program to monitor volatile organic compounds (VOC's) using a field transportable Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Path lengths of the order of a few hundred meters are typical. Measurements are taken down wind from the source of the VOC. Parameters that can affect the technique are wind, path length, temperature, barometric pressure, humidity, carbon dioxide concentration, and air borne particulates. This instrument was acquired by funds from the Iowa Waste Reduction Center.

The initial stages of this research involve the controlled release of VOC's and their qualitative and quantitative determination with the transportable FT-IR. Data from the transportable FT-IR is then compared to determinations by other methods. This can be followed by the measurement of uncontrolled releases of VOC's at documented sights. These steps are necessary to validate the qualitative and quantitative potential of the FT-IR.

Finally, measurements are taken of uncontrolled VOC releases at sites with little or no precharacterization. Examples of these are production facilities, waste disposal areas, natural gas storage facilities, gasoline stations, and power generating facilities.

The use of a field transportable FT-IR appears promising. Initial studies indicate somewhat lower VOC concentrations than determined by other methods. The determination of aromatic compounds is especially difficult due to interference from water vapor. These difficulties are more than offset by the versatility of the technique.

My second interest is in the area of developing new demonstrations which can be used to illustrate important chemical principles. Two recent examples are demonstrations to show zero and first order kinetics. These particular demonstrations allow a student to easily collect data in a classroom setting, plot data, and graphically determine reaction order.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
University of Northern Iowa
1227 West 27th Street
Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0423
Phone: 319-273-2437
FAX: 319-273-7127
E-mail: barbara.reid@uni.edu
Web: http://www.chem.uni.edu

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