Photos of the Honors Program
 University Honors Program

Course Directory

 

University Honors Program Fall 2014 Courses

 

Fall 2014 Advising Information

 

Liberal Arts Core

ANTH 1002-04 Culture, Nature, and Society
CAP 3194-01
Capstone: Perspectives on Death and Dying
COMM  1000-20
Oral Communication
EARTHSCI 1100-04 Astronomy
ENGLISH 1120-04 Introduction to Literature (Writing emphasis)
HISUS 1023-03
History of the United States
HUM 1021-24
Humanities I
HUM 1023-02
Humanities III
HUM 1023-03
Humanities III
HUM 3122-03
Japan
POL AMER 1014-08 Introduction to Amerian Politics
RELS 1020-07

Religions of the World

STAT 1772-06

Introduction to Statistics

 

Seminars & Electives

PSYCH 2601-01 Psychology of Music
UNIV 2196-01 Moral Education in Film and Literature
UNIV 2196-02

Modern Molecular Biology: Genes, Proteins, and Computers

UNIV 4197-01

Honors Thesis

UNIV 4198-01 Honors Independent Study
UNIV 1092-01

Empirical Look at Depression                                     (1st year Presidential Scholars ONLY)

UNIV 1092-02

Sophomore Think Tank (2nd year Presidential Scholars only)

 

 

Liberal Arts Core

ANTH 1002-04         Culture, Nature, and Society with Dr. Anne woodrick, 2:00-3:15 MW

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category VA (class in the Honors Cottage)

Course Description:  Culture, Nature and Society is an introductory class in socio-cultural anthropology that will be taught in a discussion seminar format.  I look forward to this class as a learning experience not only for the students, but also for myself.  I am always reevaluating the texts I use, the information I present, and class discussions in order to improve the course content, and to make relevant connections to the world we live in. The course is divided roughly into three sections. Section One examines the academic discipline of socio-cultural anthropology and focuses on the concept of culture. We will discuss topics like: Who are anthropologists? How do they collect data? How is this information analyzed? What is culture?

Section Two explores the diversity among human groups throughout the world. Our primary framework will be comparative. We will study societies from all parts of the world.  Section Three is about globalization and how global forces related to capitalistic economies affect societies all over the world, including our hometowns in the Midwest. We will evaluate the consequences of these global forces for our hometowns and for our research communities. Grading criteria are based on class attendance and discussion, writing assignments, and class presentations. Writing assignments include in-class essay exams (open book), two outside of class cultural experiences, and two mini "ethnographic" projects.  A class presentation on the interpration of folklore or a ritual is required.

Professor Biography:  Dr. Anne Woodrick is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Northern Iowa. She received her BA in Anthropology from the University of Michigan and her doctorate from the University of California, San Diego.  She has been a member of the UNI faculty since 1988. Her research interests include the role of religion in community development and mobilization among Latino immigrants in the US Midwest and the religiosity of rural Mexican women. Dr. Woodrick participated in ethnographic studies in Temax, Yucatán, Mexico, rural Central Mexico and among Latino immigrants in Marshalltown, Sioux City and Hampton, Iowa. 

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CAP 3194-01       Capstone: Perspectives on Death and Dying with Dr. Francis Degnin,                                                                                                     5:30-8:20 W

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category VI - Capstone (Junior standing)
Course Description: 

 

Professors Biography:

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COMM 1000-20     Oral Communications with ?? , 12:30-1:45 TTh

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category IB

Course Description:

    

Professor Biography:

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EARTHSCI 1100-04    Astronomy with Dr. Siobahn Morgan, 2:00-2:50 MWF + 8:00-9:50pm M

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category IVB

Course Description: Astronomy is the most ancient of sciences, and is used to help answer questions that range from the simple (why does the Moon change from night to night) to the abstract (if our Universe is expanding, what is it expanding into?).  Students will be exposed to the basic physical principles of astronomy, learn how to use the tools of astronomers, and gain a greater familiarity with the night sky. 

Students will have the opportunity to discuss the latest discoveries in the field, and examine how astronomy and science in general is presented in a variety of formats including television, film and fiction.  The content of the course will be presented asynchronously, with lectures, quizzes and tests provided in an on-line format, while class time will be spent discussing the latest news in astronomy, working through problems, clarifying complex concepts, or critiquing various media presentations of astronomy.  Lab time will be spent learning about the objects in the night sky and making observations of a variety of objects.

Professor Biography:  Dr. Morgan hails from Minnesota, and after getting her BS in Astrophysics, and MS and PhD in Astronomy, she finally got around to getting her first drivers license.  She has been at UNI since 1991, and has taught all courses in astronomy that are available.  When she isn’t teaching astronomy, Dr Morgan is working on various projects, such as computer models of stellar pulsation, and evolution, as well as creating new web-based learning modules.  She is also an avid fan of “Doctor Who”, has a vast comic book collection, watches more television than she should, and rides her bike, but not as much as she should.

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ENGLISH 1120-04    Introduction to Literature (Writing emphasis) with Dr. Richard Vanderwall, 11:00-11:50 MWF

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category IIIB 

Course Description:

 

Professor Biography:

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HISUS 1023-03   History of the United States with Dr. Joanne Goldman, 12:30-1:45 TTh

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category VA - (class in Honors Cottage)  

Course Description:  This course is designed to introduce students to the history and culture of the American people. It is organized about various themes discussed within particular chronological frameworks. We will concentrate on the themes of war and politics, gender and reform, the natural environment and economics in each of four periods of American History:

                                    Colonial Period: 1600s-1780s

                                    Early National Period à Civil War and Reconstruction:  1780s-1870s

                                    The US in an International Arena: 1880s-1940s

                                    Post World War II: 1950s-Present

Lectures and discussions will draw connections that will provide a rich context for understanding why we are, where we are, and how we got there. In addition to the required textbook assignments, there will be four supplemental readings that will be discussed in class. Students will be required to research a subject and make a presentation in class in the form of panel discussions and debates. Additionally, students will work with primary documents. There will be four exams.

 Professor Biography:  Joanne Abel Goldman came to UNI in 1990. She earned her Ph.D. in 1988 from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Her dissertation examines the process of policy formation with regard to the decision to build an integrated sewer system in New York City in the nineteenth century. This project developed Dr. Goldman’s expertise in the history of technology, history of the city, and the Early National Period, 1780s-1860s, of American History, areas in which she teaches upper level classes. More recent research interests have considered post World War II national science policy with regard to the Manhattan Project, the Ames Laboratory, and atomic energy education. Dr. Goldman considers herself an animated teacher who enjoys getting to know students and looks forward to interacting with this particularly motivated group.

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HUM 1021-24   Humanities I with Dr. Jerry Soneson, 9:30-10:45 TTh                                                                                     
*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category IIA  

Course Description:  This course is an introduction to the humanities.  Central to this area of study is the question of what it is to be civilized, to be “human” at its best.  In this course we study this question as we also develop a critical understanding of some of the more important social, economic, political and cultural elements which constitute the human story of the West from the Enlightenment on, and which have enduring significance in and for the present.  Our honors section will draw upon the imagination and creative talents of honors students by offering the opportunity for them to think about, discuss and write upon these matters in concentrated and creative ways.  About half of our time together will be devoted to lectures and art films in order to tell the historical story of the West, but the other half of our time together will be devoted to class discussion of major literary, philosophical, religious and artistic works that have been produced within that story.  Students will have abundant opportunity to work more fully with the material we cover in written exams and longer essays.

 Professor Biography:  Dr. Jerry Soneson, who came to UNI in 1991, is the Head of the Department of Philosophy and World Religions. He has also been part of the Honors Program since it began, often teaching honors sections of Humanities III, twice teaching the Presidential Scholars Seminar, The Holocaust and Religion, The Holocaust in Literature and Film, and co-teaching the Honors Seminar, The Idea of the University.  Specializing in philosophy, religion and ethics during the Modern Period, he likes to ask, to think, to write about, and to discuss with students matters which have to do with the great questions of life, such as good and evil, freedom and bondage, war and peace, tragedy and hope, ideals that make life worth living, and why humans all too often seem to blow it. He loves to teach Humanities I and Humanities III because it gives him the chance to explore all of these topics with students within the historical setting of past – Ancient, Classical and Medieval, in the case of Humanities I, and Modern, in the case of Humanities III.

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HUM 1023-02   Humanities III with Dr. Emily Machen, 9:30-10:45 TTh

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category IIA - (class in Honors Cottage)  

 

HUM 1023-03   Humanities III with Dr. Emily Machen, 11:00-12:15 TTh

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category IIA - (class in Honors Cottage)  

Course Description:  

 

Professor Biography:  

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HUM 3122-03    Japan with Dr. Cynthia Dunn, 11:00-11:50 MWF

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category IIB 

Course Description:  This course is an introduction to Japanese culture from an anthropological perspective.  Its purpose is to enable you to gain a basic familiarity with Japanese culture and society while also gaining a new perspective on your own culture and the diversity of human experience.  Throughout the course we will explore how cultural patterns such as group-belonging, social hierarchy, role-reciprocity and social relativism account or fail to account for a variety of Japanese social institutions and life experiences.  We begin with a basic orientation to Japanese geography and history.  From there our exploration moves to the small-scale units of the family and local community, gradually broadening to encompass larger social institutions related to religion, education, arts and entertainment, the workplace, and government. 

Professor Biography:  Cyndi Dunn is an associate professor of anthropology with a specialization in Japanese language and culture.  She spent two years teaching English in Japan before completing her Ph.D. in linguistic anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin.  In addition to the Japan course, she teaches courses on Language and Culture and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective.  Her research focuses on Japanese politeness and honorific use.  In 2008, she returned to Japan for a six-month study of the business etiquette training given to new employees at Japanese companies.

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 POL AMER 1014-08    Introduction to American Politics with Dr. C Scott Peters, 1:00-1:50 MWF

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category VB

Course Description: In the past decade or more, a number of remarkable events have tested our governing institutions: terrorist attacks, two lengthy wars, a deep recession, and controversy over government spending. Such events and others have sparked contentious debates about the nature of the American constitutional system, the purpose and role of government, the abilities and limitations of government in solving society’s problems, and the role of the U.S. in the world.

This course aims to better equip you to understand these and other political issues, by giving you a grounding in the principles, processes and institutions of American government. We will go beyond standard civics lessons to critically evaluate the rationale and implications of our governing principles found in the Constitution. We will also examine the institutions of government, paying special attention to how they make decisions and the factors that influence their decisions. In addition to rules and institutions, we will study how citizens behave in our democracy, how they interact with their government, and what role the media, interest groups and political parties play in that interaction.

Along the way we will discuss current events, tying our readings to the issues of the day. We will learn how to find trustworthy sources of information about American government, how to evaluate the quality of information, and how to weed out the facts from the spin. The course should help students be better informed about American politics and better consumers of information.

Professor Biography:  


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RELS 1020:07   Religions of the World with Dr. John Burnight, 1:00-1:50 MWF

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirement for Category IIIB - (class in Honors Cottage)

Course Description:  This course will provide a broad, chronologically organized survey of the development of the western, monotheistic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) from the earliest written sources through the early Islamic conquests of the 7th century C.E., followed by a survey of two major religions originating in India: Hinduism and Buddhism. We will focus on reading (in translation) the primary texts of each tradition, describing their similarities and differences in worldview, beliefs about the nature of the divine, and ideas about the purpose of human existence. This section of the course will emphasize the acquisition and development of oral presentation and writing skills: small groups will collaborate to offer presentations to the class on specific areas within the various religious traditions, and students will select a topic for in-depth individual study and write a research paper.

N.B.: We will be less concerned with the historicity of the ‘supernatural’ events described in some of the traditions than with how the stories affected the beliefs of each religion: we are tracing the development of religious thought, not trying to determine, for example, whether or not Noah did in fact build a really big boat.

Professor Biography:  John Burnight is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy and World Religions. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago’s Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in 2011, with an emphasis on Hebrew language and literature. He has been a lecturer at a small private college in the Chicago suburbs and large public universities in Connecticut and North Carolina, teaching introductory and upper-level courses in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, World Religions, and the History of Monotheism. In 2007-08 he was a Fulbright-Hays Visiting Research Fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research focuses on “subversive” or “protest” literature within the biblical texts: namely, works such as the Book of Job that speak “truth to power” and critique the dominant Israelite/Judahite theology of the biblical periods.

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STAT 1772:06   Introduction to Statistics with Dr. Mark Ecker, 12:30-1:45 TTh

*Fulfills Liberal Arts Core requirements for Category  IC

Course Description:


Professor Biography:


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HONORS SEMINARS AND ELECTIVES

PSYCH 2601:01  Psychology of Music with Dr. Carolyn Hildebrandt, 12:00-12:50 MWF

**3 credit hour psychology or university elective

Course Description:  The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to psychology of music, with special emphasis on those aspects of music that have an impact on our daily lives. Topics will include individual and cross-cultural differences in music perception and cognition; emotion and meaning in music; music in movies and advertising; music and social change; creativity in music; nature and nurture in musical development; teaching and learning music; music and the brain; and music therapy.

The class is conducted like a seminar, where students are responsible for reading, writing, listening, reflecting, and sharing their ideas with the class. Class sessions consist of mini lectures, videos, concerts, demonstrations, student presentations, guest lectures, and class discussions.  Students who wish to collect their own research data have many opportunities to do so. The course is designed to be rigorous and intellectually stimulating for all students—you don’t have to be musician or a psychology major to enjoy this class! 

Professor Biography:  Dr. Carolyn Hildebrandt is a Professor of Psychology who has been teaching Psychology of Music at UNI since 1994. She has a B.A. in Music from U.C.L.A., an M.A. in Educational Psychology from U.C. Davis, a Ph.D. in Human Development and Education from U.C. Berkeley, and did a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Developmental Psychology at U.C. Berkeley. Her main areas of research in psychology of music are the development of musical intelligence in children and adults, emotion and meaning in music, and creativity in music.  Dr. Hildebrandt is a professional pianist and an amateur cellist. She enjoys teaching Honors Psychology of Music because of the creativity and enthusiasm that the students bring to it. She encourages her students to pursue their own passions and interests and often invites former students to return as guest speakers to the class.

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UNIV 2196-01    Seminar: Moral Education in Film and Literature with Dr. Jerry Soneson & Dr. Scott Cawelti, 5:00-6:15 TTh

*3 credit hour seminar – Requires sophomore standing

Course Description: There are at least three fundamental aims of education.  The first aim is the most obvious, namely, the transmission and development of knowledge.  From the day children enter kindergarten, they begin to learn about the knowledge of the world that our culture has developed over the past centuries.  As time goes on, they eventually learn to contribute to the development of new knowledge, adding to our cultural heritage.   The second aim is the cultivation of fundamental intellectual skills necessary for living in a complex society, such as reading, writing, calculating, and thinking.  But the third aim, which is not as obvious but is perhaps more important to both individuals and to society as a whole, is moral development and transformation necessary for living a good life, what the great Greek philosopher, Socrates, calls, “the life worth living.”  This course will explore the nature of this aspect of education through an examination and discussion of literature and film that discusses and dramatizes key issues having to do with individuals and groups who are challenged with problems that call forth the need for further moral education.                                                                                                                        

Moral issues and problems are fundamentally dramatic, -- full of uncertainty about what ought to be done, how to do it, and what the expected outcomes might be.    It is not surprising that much literature and film portray dramas that embody these problems.  They constitute, in many ways, ideal case studies in moral education.   And so this course will be using some of the better examples in the literature and film that present these dramas in order to explore fundamental questions about the meaning of moral growth and transformation as educational experience.

Professor's Biography:  Dr. Jerome Soneson, who came to UNI in 1991, is the Head of the Department of Philosophy and World Religions.  He has also been part of the Honors Program since it began, often teaching honors sections of Humanities III, twice teaching the Presidential Scholars Seminar, “The Holocaust and Religion, once teaching the capstone course, “The Holocaust in Literature and Film,” and three times teaching the honors seminar, “The Idea of the University.”  Specializing in philosophy, religion and ethics during the Modern Period, he likes to ask, to think, to write about, and to discuss with students matters that have to do with the great questions of life, such as good and evil, freedom and bondage, war and peace, tragedy and hope, ideals that make life worth living, and why humans all too often seem to blow it. One reason he wants to teach this course is that he gets to think about and discuss with students the one feature of education least discussed, namely, the moral dimension of education.  Another reason is that, having dedicating his adult life to participating in and promoting education, as a good philosophical pragmatist he wants to know what good, if any, education has for cultivating good, that is, something enduringly worthwhile, something genuinely significant, genuinely civilized.  He hopes students will help to illuminate answers to this troubling question.

Dr. Scott Cawelti:,

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UNIV 2196:02     Seminar: Modern Molecular Biology: Genes, Proteins, and Computers with Dr. Aleksandar Poleksic, 12:30-1:45 TTh

*3 credit hour seminar – Requires sophomore standing

Course Description:  Bioinformatics is a relatively new interdisciplinary field combining molecular biology, computer science, mathematics, chemistry and physics. This course will cover introductory bioinformatics topics, including biological sequence and structure analysis, mathematical and computational methods for measuring DNA and protein sequence similarity, finding patterns and motifs in DNA and protein sequences, genome rearrangements and evolutionary trees. We will also explore some widely used online bioinformatics tools and online databases of DNA and protein sequences and structures. Lectures will be complemented with many hands-on exercises. Students will be asked to apply the techniques learned in class to practical problems, using a mixture of realistic and toy examples.

Professors Biography:  Aleksandar Poleksic is an associate professor of computer science. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the Florida State University, M.S. in mathematics from the University of Belgrade, and B.S. in mathematics from the University of Montenegro, Yugoslavia. His research spans the fields of computer science, computational biology and mathematics, with strong focus on protein sequence, structure and function analysis. Prior to coming to UNI, Prof. Poleksic was a senior scientist at Eidogen, Inc., where he was instrumental in the development of a novel informatics platform for rational drug discovery. At UNI, Prof. Poleksic teaches mostly theoretical computer science courses and computational biology. His teaching is interactive (rather than formal); he encourages frequent discussions, in-class exercises and small-group work.

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UNIV 1092-01    Presidential Scholars Seminar: Empirical Look at Depression with Dr. Mary C DeSoto, 1:00-2:50 W

*2 credit hour seminar – 1st year scholars only

Course Description:

 

Professors Biography: 

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UNIV 4197-01    Honors Thesis with Jessica Moon, arranged

The Honors Thesis is the final step towards earning a University Honors designation from the University of Northern Iowa.  The thesis gives Honors students the opportunity to explore a scholarly area of interest with the guidance of a faculty member.  It is intended to serve as the culmination of the Honors experience. 

The thesis provides you with experience in research as well as an opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge and expertise.  While the process may at times be challenging, it will also be rewarding.  You will enhance your knowledge of the chosen topic and further develop your research or creative skills.  The final product should leave you with a sense of pride and accomplishment for what you have attained. 

Students wishing to register for Honors Thesis must meet with Jessica to discuss course requirements and have their registration holds removed.  Call Brenda at 3-3175 to make an appointment.

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 UNIV 4198-01    Honors Independent Study with Jessica Moon, arranged

The purpose of independent study is to provide students with an opportunity to participate in an educational experience beyond what is typically offered in the classroom.  Students must be prepared to exercise a great deal of independent initiative in pursuing such studies.  Honors students may receive independent study credit for research projects of their own or those shared with faculty members, certain internship opportunities, or some types of work or volunteer experiences. 

Students wishing to register for Honors Independent Study must meet with Jessica to discuss course requirements and have their registration holds removed.  Call Brenda at 3-3175 to make an appointment.

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