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News Briefs

Contact: 

Biff Williams, chair, UNI Division of athletic training (319) 273-6824, (319) 287-3232, biff.williams@uni.edu
Susie Schwieger, associate director, The Career Center, (319) 273-6857, Susie.schwieger@uni.edu
Kamyar Enshayan, program manager, UNI Center for Energy and Environmental Education and campaign organizer for 'Buy Fresh, Buy Local, (319) 273-7575, kamyar.enshayan@uni.edu

Tips for keeping active kids safe during hot weather

Summer days mean sports camps, baseball, softball, basketball and a host of other outdoor activities for kids. Summer days also mean high temperatures and high humidity -- a potentially deadly combination. Biff Williams, chair of the UNI Division of Athletic Training, has tips on what kids should eat and drink before, during and after outdoor activities. Williams is one of the professors associated with the famous pickle juice research that has influenced how NFL teams treat heat stress among their athletes.

Contacts:

Biff Williams, chair, UNI Division of athletic training (319) 273-6824, (319) 287-3232, biff.williams@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Tight market may lead job seekers to alternate careers

The slowing economy has resulted in the tightest job market in 40 years. But Susie Schwieger, associate director of The Career Center at UNI, says job seekers in this tight market should consider veering off the beaten path to find a new position. 'If you've been laid off, this might be the right time to sit back and reevaluate your skills, and think about what other positions you might be qualified for,' she says. 'For instance, teachers who have been laid off have instructional skills and training that might make them good candidates for jobs in the training department of an organization.'

She noted too, that job seekers shouldn't put all their energy into one job search strategy. 'They need to realize that they need a 'tool box' of strategies in order to be effective in the job search.'

Contacts:

Susie Schwieger, associate director, The Career Center, (319) 273-6857, Susie.schwieger@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing and Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Buying local produce benefits the environment, diet and economy

The average food item travels 1,300 miles from the farm to your table. Kamyar Enshayan, program manager at UNI's Center for Energy and Environmental Education, says a new program, 'Buy Fresh, Buy Local,' will help Cedar Valley citizens buy food that's been grown closer to home, and with fewer chemicals, pesticides, hormones and genetically modified seeds.

'Buying local means investing our food dollars in local independent farm families who grow the food we eat,' said Kamyar Enshayan. If half of the 50,000 households of Black Hawk County spent $10 a week on locally grown produce, that would mean $1 million invested locally every month.'

Contact:

Kamyar Enshayan, program manager, UNI Center for Energy and Environmental Education and campaign organizer for 'Buy Fresh, Buy Local, (319) 273-7575, kamyar.enshayan@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761