Share this

News Briefs

Contact: 

Arthur Cox, director, UNI Real Estate Education Program, (319) 273-6986 (office); (319) 273-2929 (department office); Arthur.cox@uni.edu
Larry Hensley, professor, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, (319) 273-6442, 987-2571, Larry.Hensley@uni.edu
Kirk Henderson, UNI Roadside Program, Native Roadside Vegetation Center, (319) 273-2813, (319) 273-2238, kirk.henderson@uni.edu

Home mortgage costs remain low, but buyers should beware

As mortgage rates remain low, many homeowners and first-time buyers are considering selling or refinancing. But Arthur Cox, director of the Real Estate Education Program at the University of Northern Iowa, says buyers and borrowers should be aware of the settlement costs involved, which can drive up effective borrowing costs. All lenders are not required to disclose costs such as yield-spread premiums or back-end points. He says there's no way to predict how long rates will stay at current levels but adds 'they can't stay this way forever.'

Contacts:

Arthur Cox, director, UNI Real Estate Education Program, (319) 273-6986 (office); (319) 273-2929 (department office); Arthur.cox@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



No fries with that shake, says UNI professor

Fast food restaurants and snack-food manufacturers are scurrying to reduce portion size and fatty content, in the wake of a recent lawsuit filed by a man who said McDonald's was responsible for his obesity. Larry Hensley is a professor in UNI's School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services (HPELS), which recently received a $700,000 grant to study obesity and physical activity in children. He's encouraged by the news that some food makers are beginning to rethink some of their product lines. 'There's a mentality in this country that you have to clean your plate -- if you've got more on your plate to eat then there's a greater likelihood that you will eat more.' Hensley said gimmicks like 'super sizing' tend to disproportionately affect the economically disadvantaged. 'You get more food for a relatively little amount of money, so it seems like a good deal. '

He said, though, that the changes are a 'step in the right direction. But we also need to see a reduction in the foods that are heavily laden with fats and transfats, and we need to see better food options in general.'



Contacts:

Larry Hensley, professor, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, (319) 273-6442, 987-2571, Larry.Hensley@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Roadside vegetation program transforms ditches from simple drainage to beautiful scenery

In 1989, the state of Iowa created the Integrated Roadside Vegetation Management (IVRM) program and IRVM office at the University of Northern Iowa. Groundwater protection was the objective. Iowa used to blanket-spray herbicides over most of its 600,000 acres of state and county roadsides each year. The IRVM office works closely with the Iowa Department of Transportation and uses transportation enhancement funds to provide native prairie grass and wildflower seed for roadside plantings in 66 counties. The UNI IRVM office seeks to increase county participation and provides a variety of means of support for counties in the program. Results can be seen in vivid color across the state this time of year. Iowa is recognized nationally as a leader in the use of native plants in roadsides. According to IRVM Manager, Kirk Henderson, 'Iowa's roadside vegetation is preserved, planted, and maintained to be safe, visually interesting, ecologically integrated.'

Contacts:

Kirk Henderson, UNI Roadside Program, Native Roadside Vegetation Center, (319) 273-2813, (319) 273-2238, kirk.henderson@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, Office of Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761