Share this

News Briefs

August 10, 2003
Contact: 

Dhirendra Vajpeyi, professor of political science, (319) 273-2275, 273-2039
Steve Moon, director, UNI network services, (319) 273-6813, (319) 277-1390 steve.moon@uni.edu
Rheta DeVries, director, Regents Center for Early Development Education, (319) 232-1958, rheta.devries@uni.edu

Will rising Muslim birth rate impact future governments?



Some in Israel have expressed concern that Palestinian and Muslim birth rates are rising, while the Israeli fertility rate is dropping significantly, thus raising questions about the future population's influence on the politics of the region. Dhirendra Vajpeyi, professor of political science at the University of Northern Iowa, says while a significant number of Palestinians are Christian, the majority are Muslim, and the political ramifications could be significant. 'If you look at fertility rates of Muslims all over the world, compared to those of other religions, the Muslim rate is highest,' he says, adding that similar concerns have been expressed in other countries, including India where every religious group's birth rate is going down, except for Muslims'. Does this imbalance in population growth mean more political upheaval for the future?

Contacts:

Dhirendra Vajpeyi, professor of political science, (319) 273-2275, 273-2039

Vicki Grimes, Office of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



To download or not to download

University students across the country have been sued after downloading and sharing other copyrighted files from the Internet With the advent of the Digital Millennium Act, U.S. colleges and universities are scrambling to put into place polices that protect students' rights and inform them of their responsibilities and liabilities under the law. 'Like most institutions, UNI already had policies and procedures regarding respect for copyright law and acceptable use of network resources,' explains Steve Moon, director of network services at UNI. 'But we have had to put in place automated procedures for dealing with the weekly complaints, scale up our efforts to communicate with our users regarding their responsibilities and liabilities, and change language to specifically include MP3 and MPEG files and references to peer-to-peer file sharing programs and their dangers.' Moon says access to the Internet doesn't change an individual's responsibility to respect the property rights of others.

Contacts:

Steve Moon, director, UNI network services, (319) 273-6813, (319) 277-1390 steve.moon@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Choosing a daycare center

Almost every parent struggles, at one time or another, with the issue of daycare. Many worry about leaving their children in the care of others, and many more are concerned about the effect of all-day care by a non-parent. If you do your homework, says Rheta DeVries, director of the Regents Center for Early Developmental Education at the University of Northern Iowa, there's really little reason to worry.

'I don't think we should conclude that day care is bad for childrenï¾—but that bad day care is bad for children,' she says. 'Research has shown that the single most distinguishing characteristic that defines good day care is that the teachers have had training in child development.'

Contacts:

Rheta DeVries, director, Regents Center for Early Development Education, (319) 232-1958, rheta.devries@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761