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News Briefs

Contact: 

Chris Martin, associate professor of communication studies, (319) 273-2788, (319) 277-2991, christopher.martin@uni.edu
Roberto Clemente, associate professor, Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling and Postsecondary Education, (319) 273-3362, 296-2858, roberto.clemente@uni.edu
Siobahn Morgan, professor of astronomy, (319) 273-2389, or 273-2759; or Siobahn.Morgan@uni.edu

'American Bandstand' marks 46th anniversary

American Bandstand made its television premiere in August 1957, changing forever the way popular music would be marketed. The show and Dick Clark, its host for 30 years, are part of American culture. The hour-long show was not only TV's longest running musical series, but also the first one to focus on rock and roll. According to Chris Martin, UNI associate professor of communication studies, Bandstand defined the form. 'American Bandstand was the first TV show to offer a visual representation of music,' said Martin. 'Shows such as MTV's 'Total Request Live' are direct descendants of 'American Bandstand'.'

Contacts:

Chris Martin, associate professor of communication studies, (319) 273-2788, (319) 277-2991, christopher.martin@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Sports and parents sometimes make for a volatile mix



Over the past few years, national youth sports leagues have reported regular incidents of fights or abusive behavior involving parents or coaches. The unfortunate trend has even hit the local sports scene, where parents of youth baseball players recently clashed during a game. Roberto Clemente, associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling and Postsecondary Education at the University of Northern Iowa, says these attitudes have roots in professional sports. 'Almost every type and level of professional sports offers numerous examples of our multi-million dollar heroes using profanity, hitting fellow players and attacking referees. We see it on live TV and repeated endlessly on sports shows.'

What happens then, he says, is that sports fans -- parents included -- internalize and later imitate the actions. 'Why not? They've seen their heroes applauded, admired and well-paid despite violent actions and poor sportsmanship.'

Contacts:

Roberto Clemente, associate professor, Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling and Postsecondary Education, (319) 273-3362, 296-2858, roberto.clemente@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Close encounter from Mars

Chances are you missed the last time Mars was this close to the Earth: it happened 60,000 years ago. And if you miss it this time, you'll have to wait another 280 years. Starting in August and extending through the winter, the red planet will be on the part of its orbit that is closest to Earth. Siobahn Morgan, professor of astronomy at the University of Northern Iowa, says the relatively close position of Mars allows astronomers to observe the planet in greater detail for a long period of time. 'Having Mars very close to the Earth allows for thorough observations of the atmosphere on a much larger scale, allowing planetary scientists the chance to gather a significant amount of data on Martian weather.'

Morgan says next to the moon, Mars will be the brightest object in the night sky. In August, it will be in the southeast corner of the sky around midnight, and as the month progresses, it will be visible earlier and earlier due south.

Contacts:

Siobahn Morgan, professor of astronomy, (319) 273-2389, or 273-2759; or Siobahn.Morgan@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761