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News Release Archive

March 20, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- An evening focused around dinosaurs is in store for those attending 'Thursdaze' at the University of Northern Iowa's Maucker Union Thursday, March 24, beginning at 7 p.m.

The University Museums and its special exhibition, 'A T. rex Named SUE,' are providing programming for the evening. Family-centered activities will include a 7 p.m. showing of the 2000 Disney movie, 'Dinosaur,' and a 9:30 p.m. showing of 1993's 'Jurassic Park,' both in the Old Central Ballroom. All events are free and open to the public. Attendees can compete for free tickets to SUE by wearing 1990s dress.

'Jurassic Park' was one of the top movies of 1993, the fossil of SUE was found in 1990, and it was purchased by The Field Museum in 1997. Winners will be announced before the start of each movie. Prizes also will be awarded to those correctly answering questions about dinosaurs, following a short presentation on dinosaur facts.

'Decorate a Dino' will be available in the Union Coffeehouse from 7 to 11 p.m. Participants can create and decorate a colorful, three-dimensional cardboard T. rex. Designs will be judged in several categories, and the winners will have their creations on display at the exhibit.

'A T. rex Named SUE,' hosted by the UNI Museums, will be on exhibit through May 27, at a satellite site at the Cedar Falls Utilities Business Development Center, 1326 Waterloo Road. It features a life-sized replica of Sueï¾—the largest, most complete and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered.

Created by The Field Museum, Chicago, and made possible through the generosity of McDonald'sï¾® Corporation, the exhibit tells the story of this unprecedented scientific discovery through interactive exhibits, real-life video footage, colorful graphics and touchable casts of bones. Visitors can also get an eye-level view of the massive skull and touch models of Sue's 12-inch long teeth.

Regular hours are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday; and 1 to 4 p.m., Sunday. For more information on the exhibition, visit the Web site at www.uni.edu/museum or call (319) 273-2188.

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March 16, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A human rights leadership panel, part of the 'Leaders on Leadership' speaker series, will take place from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Thursday, March 24, in the Schindler Education Center, Room 252 on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

Speakers include Cheryl Faries, UNI Community Development coordinator; Abraham Funchess, member of the Waterloo Human Rights Commission; Lori Knight, president of UNI's Hispanic Latino Student Union and a UNI graduate student majoring in English from Cedar Falls; and, Jessica Maass, president of the UNI Chapter of Amnesty International and a UNI senior sociology major from Clive. Panel members will discuss their paths to leadership, influences on their development as a leader and advice for aspiring leaders.

The 'Leaders on Leadership' speaker series features leaders from various professional fields. Upcoming topics include media and business leadership panels and a workshop on sexual harassment.

The series, sponsored by the UNI Leadership Studies Program, is free and open to the public. Metered visitor-only parking is available in the lot immediately north of the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center at 50 cents per hour.

For more information, contact Geraldine Perreault, director of UNI's Leadership Studies Program, at (319) 273-6898 or YLA@uni.edu.

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March 15, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa --''Still Killing us Softly' will be the next featured film in the University of Northern Iowa's Reel to Real film series. The movie will be shown at noon Wednesday, March 23, in Maucker Union's University Room South and is free and open to the public.



'Still Killing Us Softly' illustrates the image of women in advertising. Using examples of ads from magazines, newspapers, album covers and billboards, this documentary presents a concise analysis of the $130 billion-a-year industry that preys on the fears and concerns of consumers, according to Guy Sims, interim director of Maucker Union.



Sims said the goal of the Reel to Real film series is to present short films that generate discussion, reflection, challenge and criticism.



For more information, contact UNI Student Activities at 273-2683 or studentactivities@uni.edu.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Department of Physics hosted the UNI/Area Education Agency 267 Regional Physics Olympics in the UNI-Dome late last month.

Approximately 190 Iowa high school and middle school/junior high school students from Waterloo, Cedar Falls, Jesup, Traer, Tama, Clarksville, and other nearby towns, participated in the regional event.

The Cedar Falls High School team placed first in the overall school team competition, which included teams that participated in all five events, and Jesup High School placed second. Their instructors are Kenton Swartley and Larry Thomas, respectively.

Don Bosco High School, Gilbertville, with instructor Roger Hahn, placed first in the 'self propelled catapult' and 'mousetrap car' events; Jesup High School placed first in the 'bridge building,' and 'soda straw arm' events; and, Cedar Falls High School placed first in the 'student-powered water heater' event.

The schools that placed, either overall or in event categories, will go on to the state physics competition, which will take place Wednesday, April 13, at Drake University in Des Moines.

'The competition provides an excellent means for our faculty and students to collaborate with AEA 267 to provide outreach to the community, and to convey that all students can apply physics principles to the real world and have fun at the same time,' said Larry Escalada, event coordinator and UNI associate professor of physics. 'The students were creative in the design and construction of their devices, and very enthusiastic in their participation.'

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- An honorary degree, Doctor of Humane Letters (L.H.D.), will be awarded to two distinguished Iowans by the University of Northern Iowa during its commencement exercises May 7, in the UNI-Dome. The Board of Regents, State of Iowa approved the action Tuesday, March 15, at its meeting in Ames.



Christine H.B. Grant, longtime gender equity advocate for women's sports who championed Title IX nationwide, from Iowa City, and Rex B. Eno, retired chairman of Life Investors Insurance Company of America and an adviser to AEGON USA, from Cedar Rapids, will receive the degrees. They were recommended to UNI President Robert Koob and the Regents, with the unanimous approval of UNI's Honorary Degree Committee and the UNI Faculty Senate.

Grant is being recognized for 'her many years of advocacy for gender equity in women's sports advocacy that has helped pave the way for millions of young women in Iowa and across the United States to gain access to opportunities for their athletic talents, and through more equitable distribution of monetary support for their educations.' She was nominated by Susan Hill, director of the UNI Women's Studies Program, and by members of the Women's Studies Advisory Board.

Grant was women's athletic director at the University of Iowa from 1973 until 2002. She was a founding member and served as president of the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) and served on the board of directors and as president of the National Association of Collegiate Women Athletic Administrators. In a citation from the National Collegiate Athletics Association in 2001, Grant was acknowledged as 'one of the most influential women in collegiate athletics.' She is recognized as a leader in the struggle for fairness for all women in all aspects of life, not just in athletics.

Grant earned a diploma in physical education from Dunfirmline College in Scotland, as well as a B.A. in physical education and a Ph.D. in athletic administration from the University of Iowa. She remains associated with the health and sport studies department at the University of Iowa and teaches graduate courses in athletic administration.

Eno, who attended UNI in the 1960s, is being recognized 'for his outstanding professional and personal accomplishments as a business leader, for his contributions to education in the state of Iowa and for his many years of service to UNI.' He was nominated by James Lubker, dean of the UNI College of Humanities & Fine Arts.



During a distinguished career, he served in various capacities at Life Investors, including as president of the company's Individual Division. At AEGON USA, the fifth largest insurance company in the world, he was senior vice president. He trained and managed scores of executives throughout his career, and continues to serve as an adviser to AEGON executive leadership today.



Eno has given of his time and talent to numerous non-profit organizations and initiatives in Cedar Rapids, including volunteer leadership for the American Diabetes Association, the YMCA and United Way of East Central Iowa.

Throughout his career and into retirement, Eno and his wife, Kathy, a 1971 B.A. degree graduate of UNI, have maintained strong bonds with UNI. He was a leading force in establishing the Iowa Mathematics Coalition housed at UNI; played an instrumental role in establishing UNI's Freeburg Early Childhood Education Center and he and his wife established the Teaching in Iowa Award Fund at UNI, to encourage outstanding graduates to stay in Iowa and teach. He is a member and past president of the UNI Foundation Board of Trustees and serves as co-chair of UNI's highly successful 'Student's First' capital campaign.

Grant will receive her honorary degree during 10 a.m. commencement exercises May 7, while Eno's will be awarded during the 2 p.m. ceremony.

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March 14, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'My Journey, My Islam,' the next film in the University of Northern Iowa's Women's History Month film series, will be shown at 9 and 11 a.m., and at 1, 3 and 7 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday, March 22 and 23, in the Center for Multicultural Education (CME), Room 109 in the Maucker Union.



The film documents how Muslim women reconcile and interpret the requirements of their faith and the obligations of Western culture. Free and open to the public, it is sponsored by the CME. Refreshments will be provided.

For more information, contact Lydia Roberts, UNI assistant director for multicultural education, at (319) 273-2250.

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March 13, 2005 - 6:00pm

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Monday, March 14















The University of Northern Iowa Museums & Collections hosts 'A T. rex Name SUE' through Friday, May 27 at the Cedar Falls Utilities Business Development Center, 1326 Waterloo Road, Cedar Falls. The exhibit is an exact replica of the largest, most complete and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered, and is so big it cannot fit inside the University Museum. Visit the museum's Web site for detailed information. Contact: Kay Thuesen, public affairs coordinator, University Museum, (319) 273-2188.















Singer-songwriter Andy White from Belfast, Northern Ireland, will perform at 7 p.m. in the KUNI Studios, CAC, third floor. Contact: Karen Impola, senior producer, Folkways, Broadcasting Services, (319) 273-6463.































Saturday, March 19















Introduction to Wind Energy and Energy Crops: A Conference for Farmers will take place, beginning at 9 a.m., at the Center for Energy and Environmental Education (CEEE). The conference includes panel discussions on wind energy, energy crops and financing options for renewable energy projects. Sponsored by the Iowa Farmers Union, the CEEE, the Iowa Energy Center, the CHS Foundation and I-RENEW. Contact: Patricia Higby, UNI CEEE energy coordinator, (319) 273-6012, or Leigh Adcock, IFU member services head, (800) 775-5227.















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Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-6728















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Feeding Our Community,' a conference focusing on food production, consumption and community building, will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wednesday, April 6, in the Old Central Ballroom in Maucker Union on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

Andy Fisher, a leading expert in the field of food security, will speak at 9 a.m. Fisher is the co-founder and executive director of the Community Food Security Coalition (CFSC), a national alliance of 325 organizations working to create a just and sustainable food system. The CFSC gained the passage of the Community Food Projects Program in the 1996 Farm Bill, doubled its funding in 2002 and recently won the creation of a national farm-to-cafeteria seed grant program.

Fisher has co-authored many articles and studies on the topic. He has served on the Board of the National Campaign for Sustainable Agriculture, the California Sustainable Agriculture Working Group and Ocean View Farms, a community garden in Los Angeles.

Dana Jackson will speak at 12:15 p.m. She is the associate director of the Land Stewardship Project, a 22 year-old non-profit membership organization in Minnesota, and directs the Farm and City Food Connections Program. Along with her daughter, Laura Jackson, UNI associate professor of biology, she is the co-editor of The Farm as a Natural Habitat: Reconnecting Food Systems with Ecosystems, a collection of readings on nature and farming.

Three panel discussions will take place during the conference: 'Access to Food: Insuring That All People Can Obtain Nutritious Food,' at 10 a.m.; 'Producers and Consumers: Creating New Linkages,' at 1:15 p.m.; and, 'Community Gardening: Bringing People Together Through Food Production,' at 3:15 p.m.

Registration for the conference is $20 and includes all program materials and a lunch featuring locally-grown products. This program is approved for .6 hours of continuing social work education credit for an additional $10 processing fee.



For more information or to register, visit www.uni.edu/contined/ces/localfood, or contact Al Hays, UNI professor of public policy, at (319) 273-2910 or Allen.Hays@uni.edu.



Sponsors for this conference include the UNI Graduate Program in Public Policy, the Northeast Iowa Food Bank, the UNI Botanical Center, UNI Local Food Project, Global Health Corps and Practical Farmers of Iowa, in conjunction with UNI Conference and Event Services.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Green Living,' a program promoting an environmentally safe lifestyle, will take place at 7 p.m., Monday, March 21, at the Center for Energy and Environmental Education (CEEE) auditorium on the University of Northern Iowa campus. This program is part of the CEEE 10th Anniversary Program Series.



'Green Living' will feature Dan Isbell, a Vinton resident, who practices environmental stewardship in everyday life, according to Patricia Higby, energy educator at the UNI Center for Energy & Environmental Education. Isbell will show a DVD, taking viewers on a tour of his wind-, solar- and biomass-powered home, located on the Cedar River.



In addition to the DVD tours, he will share his personal story of living an environmentally friendly and energy-efficient lifestyle. A question and answer session will follow.



For more information, contact Higby at (319) 273-6012 or Patricia.Higby@uni.edu.

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March 9, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Introduction to Wind Energy and Energy Crops: A Conference for Farmers' will begin at 9 a.m., Saturday, March 19, at the University of Northern Iowa's Center for Energy & Environmental Education (CEEE). This event is sponsored by the Iowa Farmers Union (IFU); the CEEE; the Iowa Energy Center; the CHS Foundation, formerly two separate organizations, the Cenex Foundation and the Harvest States Foundation; and, I-RENEW (Iowa Renewable Energy Association).







According to Leigh Adcock, IFU member services head, farmers will have the opportunity to learn about the benefits of using wind energy on farms and how to make this opportunity a reality. The conference will include panel discussions about wind energy, energy crops and financing options for renewable energy projects. In addition to this, the conference will offer an optional tour of a wind and water project at Hickory Hills Park, and of a small wind turbine at John Bendickson's farm near Vinton..







For more information, contact Leigh Adcock at (800) 775-5227, or visit www.iafu.org for a registration form.



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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Aaris Sherin, University of Northern Iowa assistant professor of graphic design, is overseeing the design of educational panels and exhibits for the Carrie Chapman Catt Museum in her role as its creative director. The museum, located three miles southeast of Charles City, is Catt's childhood home, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Sherin and the UNI students working with her, are designing interactive exhibits about Catt, focusing on her connections to Iowa and her work for the women's suffrage movement. They will use text, imagery, artifacts and video to highlight how Catt's time in Iowa, first as a child growing up and then as a mature woman, influenced her character and the evolution of her core beliefs in women's rights, equality and pacifism.

'This project provides a unique chance for students to interface and interact with a diverse group of community leaders, an area non-profit agency, and historical and archival experts,' said Sherin.



(Name) a (classification) (major) major from (hometown) , is a part of the museum interiors design team.

Catt was a coordinator of the women's suffrage movement and revitalized the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). She played an important role in its campaign that gave women the right to vote. In 1920, Catt founded the League of Women Voters.

Restoration began in early January; the anticipated completion date is August 26. Due to the restoration, the museum does not currently have regular hours. To arrange a visit to the Carrie Chapman Catt Museum, call (641) 228-3336.

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HOMETOWN NAME/CLASSIFICATION MAJOR

CEDAR RAPIDS Aaron Brandt/senior fine/studio arts

Sarah Dukes/senior fine/studio arts

DENVER Renee Meyer/senior fine/studio arts

DES MOINES Jennie Maass/senior fine/studio arts

DUBUQUE Brian Deiter/senior marketing

ELY Matt Rowland/senior fine/studio arts

GOWRIE Alyssa Stokesbary/senior fine/studio arts

MARION Celeste Geralds/junior fine/studio arts

NEVADA Melissa Sayen/senior fine/studio arts

WATERLOO Todd Calfee/senior fine/studio arts

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa students majoring in communicative disorders have been awarded numerous academic scholarships during the 2004-2005 academic year.

___(Student's name)ᆲᆲᆲᆲᆲ__, a ᆲᆲ__(classification)___ from __(hometown)__, was awarded a __(scholarship)__ in the amount of __(amount)__.

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HOMETOWN NAME/CLASSIFICATION SCHOLARSHIP/AMOUNT

AFTON Melissa M. Bradley/graduate student 7th District Quota International, Inc.

Educational Grant/$500

ATLANTIC Abby J. Sievers/senior Humpl-Guthart Sertoma Scholarship/$400;

CHFA Jr./Sr. Scholarship Award/$1,000

BETTENDORF Jill E. Jensen/senior CHFA Jr./Sr. Scholarship Award/$1,000

CEDAR FALLS Lindsay F. Phillips/senior Carlin Hageman NSSLHA,

Undergraduate/$100

CENTERVILLE Lindsey N. Clark/senior Dean's Undergraduate Award/$700

CHARLES CITY Marcy K. Franke/senior Irene M. Thompson Scholarship/$325;

7th District Quota International, Inc.

Educational Grant/$500;

CHFA Jr./Sr. Scholarship Award/$1,000

DENISON Afton J. Ehlers/senior CHFA Jr./Sr. Scholarship Award/$1,000

DUNDEE Sarah J. Heims/graduate student Iowa Speech-Language Hearing Association

(For outstanding scholarship and clinical

excellence. Awarded at Annual Conference Oct. 21-23, 2004.)



EAST DUBUQUE Amy M. Kennicker/junior CHFA Jr./Sr. Scholarship Award/$1,000

Pauline Mann Mitchell Book Award/$200

HUDSON Kimberly S. Poppe/senior 7th District Quota International Inc.

Educational Grant/$500

MILFORD Amanda Mortenson/junior 7th District Quota International Inc.

Educational Grant/$300

SIOUX CITY Lindsay D. Deitloff/senior Dr. Lois Shefte Potter Scholarship/$1,690

SUMNER Melissa M. Mueller/graduate student Roy E. Eblen Scholarship/$1,500

Carlin Hageman NSSLHA, Graduate/$100

TRIPOLI Laura G. Wright/junior 7th District Quota International Inc.

Educational Grant/$500

URBANDALE Emily A. Wilson/graduate student Iowa Speech-Language Hearing Association

(For outstanding scholarship and clinical

excellence. Awarded at Annual Conference Oct. 21-23, 2004.)

WATERLOO Emily A. Potter/graduate student Iowa Speech-Language Hearing Association

(For outstanding scholarship and clinical

excellence. Awarded at Annual Conference Oct. 21-23, 2004.)

Jane E. Murphy/graduate student Iowa Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Foundation Scholarship/$500

WAVERLY Jennifer L. Seward/graduate student Iowa Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Foundation Scholarship/$500

2004 Boots Award for Clinical Talent/$50

OUT-OF-TOWN NAME/CLASSIFICATION SCHOLARSHIP/AMOUNT

MEMPHIS, TENN. Nicole R. Marshall/graduate student 2004 Boots Award for Clinical Talent/$50

-END-

March 7, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'America's Lost Landscape: The Tallgrass Prairie,' a film edited by a Marshalltown High School and University of Northern Iowa graduate, Clayton Condit, will air on Iowa Public Television (IPTV) at 8 p.m., Friday, March 11, during 'Festival 2005.'

'Festival' is IPTV's annual two-week fundraising special and the documentary is one of the premium programs being featured. Viewers are eligible to receive copies of the film in exchange for donations made to the station. 'America's Lost Landscape' previously aired on Sunday, March 6, and 137 pledges, totaling $17,000 were made to IPTV during that broadcast.

The film premiered at a special showing at UNI last April, and made its Des Moines debut in December. It also will be featured at the Iowa Academy of Science meetings April 22 and 23, at Cornell College in Mt. Vernon, and at the Iowa Prairie Conference, July 22 and 23, in Cedar Rapids.

Daryl Smith, UNI professor of biology and director of the UNI Native Roadside Vegetation Center, was the executive producer and co-produced the feature-length documentary. The film was written, directed and co-produced by David O'Shields of New Light Media.

Condit, son of Rick and Kirstan Condit of Marshalltown, has been involved in post-production for more than 10 years, doing creative off-line, on-line and design compositing. His career began with the UNI Office of Marketing & Public Relations, while a student. He later was a staff editor for HDMG Post and Effects of Eden Prairie, Minn., and served as an independent editor before building his own facility in 2001. Condit is owner and president of Splice Here, Inc., in Minneapolis.

Annabeth Gish, Cedar Falls native and critically acclaimed actress, was the narrator. Gish, seen most recently as President Bartlett's older daughter on NBC's 'The West Wing,' also starred as agent Monica Reyes on 'The X-Files.' Her feature films include 'Double Jeopardy,' 'Nixon,' and 'SLC Punk.'

According to Smith, 'America's Lost Landscape' uses breathtaking cinematography, original music and moving narrative to trace the prairie's transformation from natural landscape to farmland, beginning in the early 1800s, when Iowa was blanketed by 28 million acres of tallgrass.

'At the time of settlement in the 1830s, about 240 million acres of tallgrass prairie was a major landscape feature of North America,' Smith explained. 'But in one of the most astonishing alterations of nature in human history, most of the tallgrass prairie was converted to cropland in less than 80 years.'

Today, where modern machinery cultivates rows of corn and soybeans, there once was a sea of tallgrass, inhabited by bison and elk. 'For the most part, Americans have no idea what the Midwest was like 150 years ago,' O'Shields said. 'The tallgrass prairie is a national treasure. If we think it is important for people to understand tropical rain forests, their demise and the global impacts, how much more important is it for us to understand that a major ecosystem in the heart of this country is nearly gone? We must understand what was here and embrace and preserve what remains.'

To tell this rich and complex tale, Smith and O'Shields interviewed writers, historians and scientists across the nation to put together the film. 'Each provided factual information and insightful commentary about the history of human settlement of the tallgrass prairie by Native Americans and Euro-Americans,' O'Shields said. 'Quotations from letters, diaries and other works of nonfiction add authenticity and connect the viewer to the story.'

Gish said working on the project was not just a moving experience, but a chance to learn as well. 'The message behind the film is stirring and important for everyone to know: The essence of the prairie is still alive, but it needs to be fought for, restored and appreciated to continue to sustain us.'

The film is available on DVD/VHS through www.newlightmedia.tv. For more information and to view a brief clip, visit www.uni.edu/~lostland.

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The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, will meet at Iowa State University Monday and Tuesday, March 14 and 15. Specific times for discussion of most items are unknown. The docket is available on the Web at www2.state.ia.us/regents/Meetings/Agendas/agenda.html



1. Proposed non-tuition-related fees and misc. charges



Contact:



Philip Patton, registrar, (319) 273-2244



2. Department of Residence preliminary budget and rates



Occupancy



Residence-hall occupancy is projected at 3,668, a 1.8-percent decrease. UNI has a nationally recognized housing and dining program, coupled with the 2-Year Advantage Program, which locks in room and board rates for two years. These factors are helping the UNI Department of Residence remain competitive in the marketplace.



Room and board rates



The benchmark double-room/full-meal plan will increase $258, which represents a 4.9-percent increase. This is the lowest percentage increase in eight years. Even with the increase, UNI maintains the lowest room and board rate among the three state universities.



Contact:



Michael Hager, director of residence, (319) 273-2333



3. Proposed parking rates



Contact:



Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration & finance, (319) 273-2382



4. Quarterly investment and cash management report



Contact:



Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration & finance, (319) 273-2382



5. Capital register



Human Performance Complex -- schematic design presentation and approval



The proposed Human Performance Complex supports the university and College of Education strategic plans. It will be funded through a combination of federal, private and institutional funds. This addition to the existing Wellness Recreation Center is focused on 1) supporting the academic athletic training program; and 2) providing space for programs related to healthy youth development, including academic programs in leisure, youth and human services, and health promotion education. Examples of some of those programs are Camp Adventure Youth Services, Global Health Corps, and the National Program for Playground Safety.



Contact:



Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration & finance, (319) 273-2382



Chris Edginton, director, UNI School of Health, Physical Education & Leisure Services, (319) 273-2840



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Contact:



James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-6728







Body:

CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'America's Lost Landscape: The Tallgrass Prairie,' a film co-produced by a University of Northern Iowa professor, will air on Iowa Public Television (IPTV) at 8 p.m., Friday,

March 11, during 'Festival 2005.'

'Festival' is IPTV's annual two-week fundraising special and the documentary is one of the premium programs being featured. Viewers are eligible to receive copies of the film in exchange for donations made to the station. 'America's Lost Landscape' previously aired on Sunday, March 6, and 137 pledges, totaling $17,000 were made to IPTV during that broadcast.

The film premiered at a special showing at UNI last April, and made its Des Moines debut in December. Daryl Smith, UNI biology professor and director of the UNI Native Roadside Vegetation Center, was the executive producer and co-produced the feature-length documentary. The film was written, directed and co-produced by David O'Shields of New Light Media.

Clayton Condit of Minneapolis, formerly of Marshalltown, was the film's editor. Annabeth Gish, Cedar Falls native and critically acclaimed actress, was the narrator. Gish, seen most recently as President Bartlett's older daughter on NBC's 'The West Wing,' also starred as agent Monica Reyes on 'The X-Files.' Her feature films include 'Double Jeopardy,' 'Nixon,' and 'SLC Punk.'

According to Smith, 'America's Lost Landscape' uses breathtaking cinematography, original music and moving narrative to trace the prairie's transformation from natural landscape to farmland, beginning in the early 1800s, when Iowa was blanketed by 28 million acres of tallgrass.

'At the time of settlement in the 1830s, about 240 million acres of tallgrass prairie was a major landscape feature of North America,' Smith explained. 'But in one of the most astonishing alterations of nature in human history, most of the tallgrass prairie was converted to cropland in less than 80 years.'

Today, where modern machinery cultivates rows of corn and soybeans, there once was a sea of tallgrass, inhabited by bison and elk. 'For the most part, Americans have no idea what the Midwest was like 150 years ago,' O'Shields said. 'The tallgrass prairie is a national treasure. If we think it is important for people to understand tropical rain forests, their demise and the global impacts, how much more important is it for us to understand that a major ecosystem in the heart of this country is nearly gone? We must understand what was here and embrace and preserve what remains.'

To tell this rich and complex tale, Smith and O'Shields interviewed writers, historians and scientists across the nation to put together the film. 'Each provided factual information and insightful commentary about the history of human settlement of the tallgrass prairie by Native Americans and Euro-Americans,' O'Shields said. 'Quotations from letters, diaries and other works of nonfiction add authenticity and connect the viewer to the story.'

Gish said working on the project was not just a moving experience, but a chance to learn as well. 'The message behind the film is stirring and important for everyone to know: The essence of the prairie is still alive, but it needs to be fought for, restored and appreciated to continue to sustain us.'

The film is available on DVD/VHS through www.newlightmedia.tv. For more information and to view a brief clip, visit www.uni.edu/~lostland.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Chamber Singers will perform at several schools during their Iowa tour, Wednesday through Friday, March 9-11. Performances will take place at Simpson College, Indianola, Wednesday, March 9; Lewis Central High School in Council Bluffs, and Sloan High School, Thursday, March 10; and Garner-Hayfield Senior High School in Garner, and Mason City Senior High School, Friday, March 11.

____(Name)_____, _____(classification and major)_____ major of ___(Hometown)____, will be performing with the UNI Chamber Singers, under the direction of Brad Barrett, assistant professor of choral conducting.

Repertoire for this tour is 'Hodie' by Allen Koepke; 'The Lamb,' by John Taverner; 'Gloria,' by Z. Randal Stroope; 'Is Not a Flower a Mystery,' by Donald McCullough; 'She Walks In Beauty,' by David Foltz; 'Leonardo and His Amazing Flying Machine,' by Eric Whitacre; and 'Didn't my Lord Deliver Daniel,' arranged by Moses Hogan.

'This is an opportunity for our host communities to hear fine choral ensemble,' said Barrett. 'Our concerts will provide an opportunity for prospective students to hear a representative choir from UNI.'

For more information about the Chamber Singers tour, contact Barrett at (319) 273-6113 or Brad.Barrett@uni.edu.

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March 6, 2005 - 6:00pm

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Monday, March 7















CROW Forum, 'Negotiating Gendered Spaces' will be presented at noon in the Maucker Union Presidential Room, by Gowri Betrabet-Gulwadi, UNI assistant professor of interior design. Contact: Gulwadi, (319) 273-2603.















Mark Edlund of the St. Croix (Minn.) Watershed Research Station will present an earth science seminar, 'Linking Climate Change and Biodiversity on the Mongolian Steppe,' at 4 p.m., in Latham Hall 125. Edlund specializes in large lake paleoecology and diatom systematics and has worked extensively on North American and Asian lakes and rivers. He also teaches a diatom class at Iowa Lakeside Lab. Contact: Lynn Brant, UNI associate professor of earth science, (319) 273-6160.















Sue Joslyn, UNI professor of epidemiology and chair of the UNI Division of Health Promotion and Education, will speak on cancers that affect college students, at 6:30 p.m., in Sabin Hall 327. There also will be a panel discussion with Francis Degnin, assistant professor of philosophy, who teaches a death and dying class, and UNI student Teske Drake and her mother. Sponsored by Phi Upsilon Omicron, a national honor society in design, family and consumer sciences. Contact: Susan Moeller, (319)















268-2071.































Eric Ehrenreich, 2004-2005 Douglas and Carol Cohen Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, will lecture on, ''Neutral' Anti-Semitism: Scientific Racial Propaganda and the Holocaust,' at 7 p.m., in Seerley Room 115. Contact: Sara Kimble, UNI assistant professor of history, (319) 273-2097.































Bill Leighty, director of the Leighty Foundation in Juneau, Alaska, will present 'What Hydrogen Economy? Running Our Cars on Water in a Carbon-Constrained World' at 7 p.m., in the CEEE Auditorium. Leighty's lecture will focus on the potential of hydrogen from water becoming a major energy provider in the future. A reception will follow his lecture. Contact: Patricia Higby, energy educator, UNI Center for Energy and Environmental Education, (319) 273-6012.















KUNI's Live from Studio One features singer-songwriter Natalia Zukerman of New York City, an award-winning finalist in this year's songwriting competition at the Rocky Mountain Folk Festival in Colorado. Zukerman will perform at 7 p.m., in the KUNI Studio, CAC, third floor. Contact: Karen Impola, UNI senior producer, Folkways, UNI Broadcasting Services, (319) 273-6463.















Monday, March 7 (continued)















Oscar-nominated Iranian actress Shohreh Aghdashloo, from the movie 'House of Sand and Fog,' will address the Hearst Lecture Series topic, 'Recognizing and Crossing Borders: Artistic Responses to our Global Situation,' at 7:30 p.m., in the Strayer-Wood Theatre. Hosted by the UNI Department of Theatre. Contact: Jascenna Haislet-Carlson, Theatre UNI marketing director and theatre publicist, (319) 273-6381.















The Friends of KUNI Radio will host an informational meeting regarding the formation of Iowa Public Radio at 7 p.m. in the Communication Arts Center, Room 108. Contact: John Hess, director, UNI Broadcasting Services, 273-6406.















Tuesday, March 8















Alpha Phi Omega will sponsor a blood drive through the Blood Center of Iowa, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., in Maucker Union. Contact: Megan Wallace at mwallace@uni.edu or Cheryl Moses at (319) 273-2461 or cheryl.moses@uni.edu















'Control Room,' part of the Social Justice Film Series, will be shown at 7 p.m. in Sabin 102. This award-winning documentary by Arab-American filmmaker Jehane Noujaim examines the controversial Arab news network Al-Jazeera and its coverage of the Iraq war. Sponsored by Amnesty International and Students for Social Justice. Contact: Jessica Maass, president, UNI chapter of Amnesty International, (319) 277-4752.















Tuesday, March 8 and Wednesday, March 9















'Seneca Reflections, 150 Years of Women's Rights,' part of the Women's History Month Film Series, will be shown at 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m., noon, 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. in the Center for Multicultural Education. At the 150th anniversary of the First Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York, participants were asked to put the 1848 convention is perspective for a contemporary audience. Sponsored by the CME. Contact: Lydia Perez Roberts, UNI assistant director for multicultural education, (319) 273-2250.















Wednesday, March 9















Annette Lynch and Mitchell Strauss, UNI associate professor and professor of textiles and apparel, respectively, will present 'I Can See By Your Outfit That You Are a Singing Cowboy: Analysis of Dress and Masculinity Construction in Gene Autry's Depression Era Wild West Identity,' at 7 p.m. in Seerley 115. Part of the Department of History Lecture Series. Contact Lynch, (319) 273-2114 or Strauss, (319) 273-2702















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More than 800 million Barbies sold as popular doll marks another anniversary

Wednesday marks another anniversary for 'Barbie,' the popular doll that first debuted in stores March 9, 1959. Since that time, more than 800 million Barbies have been sold and several generations have grown up with her as a favorite companion.

Karen Mitchell, UNI associate professor of communication, has studied the icon for years and says she's had an 'on-again, off-again' relationship with Barbie that led her to write last year's play, 'Barbie Undone.' Says Mitchell, 'Our relationship is complicated.

'On some levels, she and I are much alike. We're single, childless, career women with great accessories for all our fashion ensembles. We like to travel (although we rarely travel 'light'), enjoy the performing arts and have busy social calendars. She is, of course, more popular than I. She's also thinner. And she makes scads more money. I hate her as much as I love her. I long to ban her from our feminist queendom, and, at the same time, I long to bring her into the fold.'

Contacts:

Karen Mitchell, UNI associate professor of communication, (319) 273-2640

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-6728

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Little likelihood Pope John Paul II would ever step down

'The Roman Catholic church is the oldest continuously surviving institution on the planet,' says Robert Dise, UNI associate professor of history. But in its 2,000 years, it has never witnessed the voluntary retirement of a legitimately elected pope.

There is no mechanism for replacing a pope who is incapacitated by age or illness, says Dise, a Roman historian who has a long-standing interest in the history of the early and medieval church.

Dise notes that election to be pope is regarded as an act of consecration by the Holy Spirit. A pope cannot surrender that consecration, since the divine power is greater than any human act of will, nor can the Church take it away if the election was valid, since there is no authority in the Church higher than the pope, because Jesus bestowed supreme power in the Church on the first pope, Saint Peter, by giving Peter the keys to the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 16: 18-19).

'Thus, John Paul could not walk away from the papacy,' Dise said. 'And, if an election were held for a new pope before John Paul's death, then there would be two incumbents and the question would arise whether this election was valid, since his predecessor was still alive. The newly elected pope might be seen as what the Church calls an 'anti-pope.' The last time there was an anti-pope was in 1449.'

Contact:

Robert Dise, UNI associate professor of history, (319) 273-5906

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319 273-6728

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March 2, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A team of University of Northern Iowa students is gaining valuable experience working with young children through Kindergym, a Saturday morning, parent and child physical activity program for preschool children two to five years old.















____(Name)___ , a ___(classification and major)___ major from ___(Hometown) , is part of the student team.















The students also are paired with a preschool teacher from the field who is participating in Kindergym as part of a workshop called 'Project PLAY (Preschool Lessons for Active Youngsters).' Kindergym and 'Project PLAY' are sponsored by the Youth Fitness & Obesity Institute at UNI.















For the second year in a row, 80 children enrolled, which is the maximum capacity for the program, now in its 20th year. Karyn Finn, UNI Kindergym coordinator, said the program relies on the UNI students for their leadership and enthusiasm.















For more information about the Kindergym program, contact Karyn Finn at Karyn.Finn@uni.edu.















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March 1, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Seneca Reflections: 150 Years of Women's Rights,' the next film in the Center for Multicultural Education's Women's History Month film series, will be shown at 9:30 and 11 a.m., and at noon, 3 and 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 8, and Wednesday, March 9, in the Center for Multicultural Education (CME), which is Room 109 in the Maucker Union on the University of Northern Iowa campus.



In this 30-minute video, participants in the 150th anniversary of the First Women's Rights Convention, in Seneca Falls, N.Y., were asked to put the 1848 convention in perspective for a contemporary audience. This is a rare tribute to the remarkable women, past and present, whose lives have furthered the cause of women's rights, according to Lydia Roberts, UNI assistant director for multicultural education.



Refreshments will be provided.



This event, sponsored by the CME, is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Roberts at (319) 273-2250.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Gallery of Art will present its Annual Juried Student Art Exhibition in the Kamerick Art Building (KAB) March 22 to April 17. The competition showcases outstanding recent works by undergraduate and graduate students in the UNI Department of Art.

More than 400 pieces of work in various media are submitted annually. This year, juror Teresa Paschke, assistant professor of art and design at Iowa State University, will choose 100 works for display. She will deliver a juror's lecture at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 9, in KAB 111, sponsored, in part, by the Florence Hartwig Foundation.

The awards ceremony for the student exhibition will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 22, in the KAB Art Auditorium, Room 111. An opening reception will follow. Awards made to students last year totaled nearly $4,100.

The exhibition, juror's lecture and opening reception are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday; and, noon to 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. The gallery is located at the corner of Hudson Road and West 27th Street, on the main floor of the Kamerick Art Building. For more information, call (319) 273-3095 or visit www.uni.edu/artdept/gallery/

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'I Can See By Your Outfit That You Are a Singing Cowboy: Analysis of Dress and Masculinity Construction in Gene Autry's Depression Era Wild West Identity' will be the topic of the Phi Alpha Theta/University of Northern Iowa History Lecture Series, at 7 p.m., Wednesday, March 9, in Seerley Hall, Room 115, on the UNI campus.



Annette Lynch, UNI associate professor of textile and apparel, and Mitchell Strauss, UNI professor of textile and apparel, will deliver the lecture, sponsored by the UNI Department of History, UNI History Club and Phi Alpha Theta history honorary. It is free and open to the public.

Lynch and Strauss' lecture will focus on cowboy mythology depicted in low budget, series Westerns, predominant during the Depression years of the 1930s in the form of the Singing Cowboys films, known also as 'Horse Operas.' The Singing Cowboy was an immensely important cultural figure, representing the fantasies, desires and ambitions of those who experienced the economic hardship, dispossession and dislocation of the era, according to P. Stanfield, author of the book 'Horse Opera: The Strange History of the 1930s Singing Cowboy.'



'Autry was well known for his rather flamboyant Western dress, an appearance resplendent in comparison to other male characters in his films,' Strauss said. 'Extravagant dress, combined with his pleasant, perhaps 'sweet,' personality created contradictions with the common view of cowboy masculinity.'



Lynch received her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota and Strauss received his Ed.D. at the University of Virginia, both in 1992. They are currently working on a book together focused on fashion change theory.

The next lecture in the 2004-2005 History Lecture Series will be April 13. For more information about the March 9 lecture, contact Annette.Lynch@uni.edu or Mitchell.Stauss@uni.edu.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Six international scholarship students will begin intensive English language study and academic preparation at the University of Northern Iowa, Monday, March 7.

Through the Partnerships for Learning Undergraduate Studies (PLUS) program, an initiative of the U. S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the students will participate in UNI's Culture & Intensive English Program (CIEP).

For the second consecutive year, CIEP is one of only 12 university English programs in the nation chosen to provide language training.

PLUS, part of the Partnerships for Learning initiative, provides scholarships for undergraduate students from the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia to study in the United States.

'We expect six scholarship students to arrive for the CIEP term. They will stay until the end of July when they will transfer to other universities in the U.S., where they will do their undergraduate studies,' said Robert Pesek, UNI CIEP director. 'Two students will come from Morocco, and one each from Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tunisia and Syria. They will be staying in housing on campus so they can experience the sense of community in the residence halls.'

PLUS selects outstanding students who have completed at least two years of undergraduate study at a home institution. Students receive a full scholarship for enhancing their English language and study skills, and two years of study leading to a bachelor of arts degree from select U.S. colleges and universities.

'It is a real honor to have the Department of State choose UNI's Culture and Intensive English program to teach their scholarship students English for the second year in a row,' Pesek said. 'UNI is truly world class.'

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A 'Cancer Awareness' lecture will take place from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Monday, March 7, in Sabin Hall, Room 327, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

Sue Joslyn, UNI professor of epidemiology and chair of the Division of Health Promotion and Education at the University of Northern Iowa, will discuss cancers that affect college students.

A panel discussion will also take place. The panel will feature Francis Degnin, UNI assistant professor of philosophy and Teske Drake, a UNI senior majoring in social work from Cedar Falls, with her mother, who has had cancer.

The lecture is free and open to the public, and is sponsored by Phi Upsilon Omicron, a national honor society for all majors in family and consumer sciences.

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February 28, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Control Room,' the next film in the University of Northern Iowa's Social Justice Film Series, will be shown at 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 8, in Room 102 of Sabin Hall.



The documentary, by Arab-American filmmaker Jehane-Noujaim, examines the controversial Arab news network Al-Jazeera and its coverage of the Iraq War.

This event is sponsored by Students for Social Justice and the UNI chapter of Amnesty International, and is free and open to the public.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- James Lubker, dean of the College of Humanities & Fine Arts (CHFA) at the University of Northern Iowa, has been named interim UNI provost and vice president for academic affairs, pending approval of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa. The appointment will be effective no later than July 1.

Lubker replaces Aaron Podolefsky, who accepted the position of president of Central Missouri State University late last month.

'Jim has garnered great respect in his role as Dean of the College of Humanities & Fine Arts, and I expect that he will do similarly in his role as interim provost,' said UNI President Robert Koob. 'I look forward to working more closely with him.'

A search committee for a permanent replacement will be formed in the fall.

Lubker, who also holds the rank of professor of communicative disorders, has been CHFA dean since 1995. A native of Estherville, he earned a bachelor's degree and teaching certificate in biology and history from Mankato State University. He completed his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in speech science and phonetics at the University of Iowa.

He served as an assistant professor of otolaryngology and maxillofacial surgery at University Hospitals in Iowa City, before taking a post in the Dental Research Center at the University of North Carolina. He then joined a research team in the Institute of Linguistics at the University of Stockholm, later serving as chair of the institute's Department of Phonetics.

Before his move to UNI, Lubker was professor and chair of the Department of Communication Science and Disorders at the University of Vermont, also serving as a professor of psychology and professor of neurology, the latter, in the College of Medicine; and then, associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Says Lubker of his service at UNI, 'The position of dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts has been the most rewarding and enjoyable of all the positions I have held, and the University of Northern Iowa has been, in every possible way, the best university at which I have worked.'

Reinhold Bubser, associate dean of CHFA, will serve as interim dean of the college. He also holds rank as a professor of German at UNI. He joined the modern languages faculty in 1982, and was named CHFA associate dean in 1996. He earned a B.A. degree from Western Michigan University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Michigan State University.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Legal Issues Every Woman Should Know' will be the second program in a spring semester series on women and leadership, offered by the University of Northern Iowa's Undergraduate Women's Studies Program as part of its Women on Fridays series. It will take place at noon, Friday, March 4, in Baker 161.



Local attorney, Judith Benson, will discuss legal issues that may affect women later in life.

The series will conclude April 15, when Jean Trainor, president/CEO of John Deere Community Credit Union, will present 'Financial Leadership.'



'Women on Fridays provides an opportunity to explore what it means to be a woman in today's society,' said Susan Hill, director of UNI's Undergraduate Program in Women's Studies. 'Throughout the spring, we are focusing on women in leadership roles in the local Waterloo/Cedar Falls community.'



The sessions are free and open to the public. Those attending may bring a lunch; dessert will be provided.



For more information, contact Susan Hill, (319) 273-7195.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- An in-depth look at how Iowa's renewable energy resources, such as wind power and biomass, can help harness hydrogen-- an inexhaustible, pollution-free resource-- will be presented at 7 p.m., Monday, March 7, in the auditorium of the Center for Energy & Environmental Education at the University of Northern Iowa.

Bill Leighty, director of the Leighty Foundation in Juneau, Alaska, and co-principal of the International Renewable Hydrogen Transmission Demonstration Facility, will discuss the potential of hydrogen extracted from water becoming a major energy provider in the future. His talk is titled 'What Hydrogen Economy? Running Our Cars on Water in a Carbon-constrained World.' It is the fourth program in the CEEE's 10th anniversary series, and is open to the public, free of charge. A reception, sponsored by the Leighty Foundation, will follow the program.



For more information, contact Patricia Higby, energy educator at the CEEE, at (319) 273-6012 or Patricia.Higby@uni.edu.

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February 27, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Eric Ehrenreich will present a lecture on ''Neutral' Anti-Semitism: Scientific Racial Propaganda and the Holocaust' at 7 p.m., Monday, March 7, in Seerley Hall, Room 115, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

As a lecturer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Ehrenreich has taught courses on the 'History of European Racism,' 'Modern Jewish History' and 'Europe Between the Wars.'

Ehrenreich holds a doctorate in history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His dissertation, which he is currently expanding, is titled 'Genealogy and Genocide: The Nazi 'Proof of Ancestry' and its Origins.' The dissertation is a study of Nazi racial laws and the lack of scientific basis for them. He is particularly interested in the history of institutions involved in implementing Nazi racial policies, the social history relating to the implementation of such policies and the cultural history of ideas used to rationalize the policies.

He was awarded the George L. Mosse Teaching Fellowship in European History, the George L. Mosse Wisconsin Distinguished Graduate Fellowship and a Fulbright Fellowship. He has also participated in the Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies (SSRC).

This lecture is free and open to the public, and is co-sponsored by the UNI Department of History and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Academy Award nominee Shohreh Aghdashloo will speak at 7:30 p.m., Monday, March 7, in the Strayer-Wood Theatre at the University of Northern Iowa. She will discuss her life, the future of Iran and women's concerns.



She was born into an untraditional family in Iran and starred in two major films before fleeing the country during the 1978-79 revolution. Her film debut was in 1977's 'The Report,' which remains banned in Iran. Her name was banned in Iran until recently, and she is still not allowed to return.

After fleeing Iran, Aghdashloo lived in London and studied international relations and politics, virtually abandoning acting. Eventually she moved to Los Angeles and, with her second husband, founded a theatrical company that tours with Iranian plays. In 2004, Aghdashloo was nominated for an Academy Award for her role in the movie 'House of Sand and Fog.' She appeared in the first six episodes of the current season of the Fox hit show '24.'



The Meryl Norton Hearst Lecture Series is sponsored by the UNI College of Humanities and Fine Arts, with responsibility for scheduling the series rotating annually among its departments. The Department of Theatre is responsible for scheduling the 2004-2005 lectures.

The UNI Women's Studies Program is a co-sponsor of this lecture.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Jascenna Haislet-Carlson, (319) 273-6387.

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Monday, Feb. 28

'Dinos 101: An Introduction to Dinosaurs' is open through July 10 at the University Museum, 3207 Hudson Road, and features eight learning stations and four separate display cases containing information about dinosaurs. Three of the stations are interactive. The display cases feature dinosaur fossils and field tools used by scientists to discover and study fossils. Contact: Kay Thuesen, public affairs coordinator, University Museums, (319) 273-2188.

Eye on the Prize Documentary Series-Vol. 7: 'The Keys to the Kingdom' and 'Back to the Movement,' will be shown in the Center for Multicultural Education (109 Maucker Union), at 7 p.m. Contact: Michael Blackwell, UNI director of multicultural education, (319) 273-2250.

The Choral Invitational Festival, featuring approximately 500 high school students from seven Iowa high schools, takes place from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. in the GBPAC Great Hall. Each choir will perform 10 minutes of music, followed by a clinic with UNI choral staff Nicole Lamartine and Brad Barrett. Three of the top choirs will be featured during the 7 p.m. concert, along with the UNI Concert Chorale, UNI Chamber Singers and winners of the Piano Festival. Contact: Brad Barrett, UNI assistant professor of music, (319) 273-6113.

Piano Festival, featuring 20 students from across the state, begins at 1 p.m. in GBPAC Davis Hall. Students will participate in applied lessons from UNI piano faculty; attend a UNI Outstanding Organists recital and UNI Powerful Pianists recital. The top five will attend a master class; the top two students will perform at 7 p.m. in the Great Hall, in conjunction with the Choral Invitation Festival. The top two will also receive cash prizes and scholarship offers. Contact: Robin Guy, UNI professor of piano, (319) 273-2193.

Wicked Liz & the Bellyswirls will perform a mix of blues, funk, folk and rock, at 7 p.m. in the KUNI studios, CAC, third floor. Contact: Karen Impola, UNI senior producer, 'Folkways,' Broadcasting Services, (319) 273-6463.

Theatre UNI presents 'The Music Lesson,' in the Bertha Martin Theatre. Performances run through Sunday, March 6. Mixing the passionate music of Bach with haunting memories of the Bosnian war, 'The Music Lesson' tells the story of two women struggling with memories of the past and realities of the present. Check UNI Web site for specific performance times. Contact: Jascenna Haislet-Carlson, Theatre UNI marketing director and theatre publicist, (319) 273-6387.

Tuesday, March 1

Russian Movie Series opens at 7 p.m., with 'Window to Paris,' an award-winning post-Perestroika comedy (1993), in Russian, with English subtitles, in Room 115 Seerley Hall.

Tuesday, March 1 & Wednesday, March 2

'Monuments are for Men, Waffles are for Women,' part of Women's History Month film series, will be shown at 9 and 11 a.m., and 1, 3 and 7 p.m., in the Center for Multicultural Education (109 Maucker Union). The film examines the impermanence of work done by women and the permanence of work done by men in the United States. Contact: Lydia Perez Roberts, UNI CME program assistant, (319) 273-2250, or Ami Lawin, program coordinator, UNI Women's Studies Program, (319) 273-7183.

Wednesday, March 2

'Assessment of the Older Driver' will be presented via the ICN (Iowa Communications Network), at 4 p.m., in Room 130A Schindler Education Center. Focused toward those who know an older person who drivers and have questions about their safety or that of other drivers, it will be presented by Sue Toale Knapp. Contact: Holly Bokelman, UNI College of Social & Behavioral Sciences, (319) 273-7961, or e-mail Holly.Bokelman@uni.edu.

Percussion Ensemble/UNIWADE (UNI West African Drum Ensemble) Concert will be held at 8 p.m. in GBPAC Davis Hall. Guest artist John Yost will perform Japanese taiko drumming with the Percussion Ensemble and also play Malinke style solo djembe with the West African Drum Ensemble. Contact: Randy Hogancamp, UNI associate professor of percussion, (319) 273-2228.

Thursday, March 3

Psychologist and scholar Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, known worldwide for his scholarship on flow and creativity, will present 'The Creative Person and the Creative Context' at 7 p.m. in the Commons Slife Ballroom, followed by a book signing. The free event is open to the public. Contact: Gary Gute, UNI assistant professor of human development, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, (319) 273-6149. (See also March 4 entry.)

New York actress Michele LaRue will perform 'The Rib Speaks Out,' at 8 p.m. in CAC 108. This event features a vintage lecture, 'Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Monologue' and 'Eve's Diary,' a dramatization of Mark Twain's popular short stories. Contact: Ami Lawin, program coordinator, UNI Women's Studies Program, (319) 273-7183.

American Music Festival, sponsored by Phi Mu Alpha, begins at 8 p.m. in Russell Auditorium. Approximately 15 students will participate in the instrumental event, which includes solos, ensemble pieces and a performance by the Phi Mu Alpha Big Band. Contact: Evan Smith, (319) 222-3564.

Friday, March 4

Women on Fridays: 'Legal Issues Every Woman Should Know' presented by local attorney Judith Benson, at noon, in Baker Hall 161. Contact: Ami Lawin, program coordinator, UNI Women's Studies Program, (319) 273-7183.

Psychologist and scholar Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi will present 'Flow and the Quality of Life' at 3 p.m. in Lang Hall Auditorium, followed by a book signing and reception. The free event is open to the public. Contact: Gary Gute, UNI assistant professor of human development, (319) 273-6149. (See also March 3 entry.)

Saturday, March 5

'A T. rex Named Sue' will be exhibited through May 27 at the Cedar Falls Business Development Center, 1326 Waterloo Road. Because of its magnitude, the exhibit, which is an exact replica of the largest and best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex discovered, will be displayed at the Cedar Falls Utilities location. Go to www.uni.edu/museum for detailed information. Contact: Kay Thuesen, public affairs coordinator, University Museums, (319) 273-2188.

The UNI Climbing Club will sponsor a climbing competition in bouldering, speed climbing and route climbing during the day. Contact: Andrew Martin, outdoor recreation coordinator, UNI Outdoor Recreation Office, (319) 273-7163.

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Research shoes that inclusion and social interaction with typically developing peers can have positive benefits for preschoolers with autism. Though relatively little is known about how this developmental disorder affects the brain, Frank Kohler, associate professor of special education at the University of Northern Iowa, studied the value of having preschoolers with autism interact with peers, with a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Mental Health.

During the study, three- and four- and five-year-olds with autism were enrolled in an inclusive

preschool program with typically developing age-mates. Kohler says that learning to play and interact with peers enhances the cognitive, social, language and motor development of young children with autism. In his study, typically developing youngsters were taught explicit strategies to use in these interactions, such as using their friend's name, tapping them on the shoulder and being persistent with their play overtures and requests.

'They may need to use different strategies than they would with their other peers,' says Kohler. 'But this is often necessary to get these children involved in play. It also teaches them to be more accepting of children with autism rather than viewing these children as strange or different.'

Contacts:

Frank Kohler, UNI associate professor of special education, (319) 273-7478

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-6728

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Negotiating Gendered Spaces' will be the topic of the next CROW Forum lecture at noon, Monday, March 7, in the Presidential Room in Maucker Union, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

Gowri Betrabet-Gulwadi, UNI assistant professor of interior design, will introduce how the field of environment-behavior studies has explored spaces segregated by gender that reinforce gender stratification in society. She will discuss the conceptualization and study of gendered spaces using architectural and urban examples, and introduce recent research that examines how these spaces are negotiated.

Admission is free and open to the public.

The CROW (Current Research on Women) Forum series is sponsored by UNI's Graduate Program in Women's Studies.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Laquita Blockson, UNI assistant professor of management, policy and ethics, has received a grant to conduct a groundbreaking new study on African-American women entrepreneurs. The study is a joint effort with Sammie Robinson of Illinois Wesleyan University and Jeffrey Robinson of New York University. Centered at NYU, and funded by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the project is titled 'Doing It Our Way: Economic and Sociological Influences on the Success of African-American Entrepreneurs.' The team will present its initial findings at the Simmons School of Management's Leading Women Entrepreneur Series March 21.

According to Blockson, the goal of the study is to discover the economic and sociological factors that account for the viability, growth and sustainability of African-American women entrepreneurs. The team has already begun research and will present an initial paper on its findings at the Eastern Academy of Management International Meeting June 26-30, in Cape Town, South Africa.

Research has shown that women-owned businesses are the fastest growing segment of new businesses in the United States. Black women have a larger percentage of black-owned businesses than white women do of white-owned businesses, according to Blockson, though she said there is no research to explain that fact.

'Blockson's study may provide valuable findings in an area that influences researchers, professors, policy makers, the government and future entrepreneurs,' said Donna Wood, David W. Wilson Chair in Business Ethics at UNI. 'Blockson's research is important to the Cedar Falls/Waterloo community and the discussion of ethics and race in the business world, according to Wood. She is particularly interested in learning what influence African-American women-led ventures have on the social fabric of the African-American community.'

The College of Business Administration and the College of Humanities & Fine Arts jointly share the David W. Wilson Chair in Business Ethics. The chair is dedicated to educating students and the community about ethical practices, fostering discussion and debate about ethical practices, and developing theory in business ethics. Blockson is a member of the Wilson Chair in Business Ethics faculty committee.

For more information, contact Blockson at (319) 273-2020 or laquita.blockson@uni.edu.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Forty University of Northern Iowa students were elected senators during the 2005 Northern Iowa Student Government (NISG) election, held Tuesday, Feb. 22, through Wednesday, Feb. 23.

(Student's name), a (Classification) (Major) from (Hometown) was elected a NISG senator from ᆲᆲ (Residence) .

Joe Murphy, a junior economics major from Worcester, Mass. and Tarek Fahmy, a junior business administration and management major from Cedar Falls, were elected president and vice president, respectively.

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HOMETOWN NAME/CLASSIFICATION/MAJOR/RESIDENCE

AMES Diane Wilson/sophomore/accounting/on-campus at large

CEDAR FALLS Chad Bennett/graduate student/biological science/University Apartments

Tyler Christians/junior/political science/off-campus

Stephen Fish/sophomore/music/off-campus

Anthony Stumbo/senior/sociology/off-campus

Matthew Silker/sophomore/digital communication/off-campus

Grant Schultz/unlisted classification/physical education teaching/off- campus

Aaron Gillett/junior/business administration/ off-campus

CEDAR RAPIDS Malia Engelbach/sophomore/public administration/off-campus

Emily Shields/senior/marketing/off-campus

Brian Fiala/senior/finance/off-campus

Brock Toll/junior/finance/on-campus at large

CLEAR LAKE John Harrenstein/senior/organizational communication/off-campus

Hannah Anderson/junior/elementary education/Hagemann Hall

DAVENPORT Brandon Morgan/junior/accounting/off-campus

DENVER Christine Haas/junior/biochemistry/off-campus

DES MOINES Vanessa Mills/freshman/business administration/Lawther Hall

DUBUQUE Benjamin Leifker/junior/political science/Rider Hall

Nikki Covey/freshman/elementary education/Dancer Hall

FORT DODGE Jennifer Younie/sophomore/political science/off-campus

GRAND MOUND Courtney Blake/junior/public administration/ROTH

GREENE Joel O'Brien/junior/social science teacher education/off-campus

HAMPTON Ingrid Sensor/sophomore/anthropology/off-campus

Jacob Spath/junior/marketing/off-campus

HUMBOLDT Lindsey Thomas/sophomore/apparel & textiles/off-campus

IOWA CITY Timothy McCue/sophomore/public relations/on-campus at large

LE MARS Alex Gates/junior/liberal arts/off-campus

MADRID Grant Erwin/junior/family and community services/off-campus

MARION Ryan LeGrande/sophomore/social science teacher/Bender Hall

MECHANICSVILLE Kevin Kirkpatrick/freshman/digital communication /Noehren Hall

MOUNT PLEASANT Joel Kiesey/sophomore/finance/off-campus

MOVILLE Todd Kuebler/junior/criminology & psychology/off-campus

PELLA Jonathan Whalley/senior/history/off-campus

SIOUX CITY Jake Friedrichsen/junior/political science/off-campus

Timothy Lanphier/senior/business administration/off-campus

Alexandria Carter/junior/business administration/Bartlett Hall

WALFORD Beth Zobeck/junior/criminology/off-campus

WATERLOO Joe Paulsen/junior/biochemistry/off-campus

WEST DES MOINES Andrew Lietzow/junior/business administration/off-campus

WILLIAMSBURG David Kniffen/junior/finance/off-campus

-END-

February 23, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Two University of Northern Iowa juniors, Joe Murphy, an economics major from Worcester, Mass.; and Tarek Fahmy, a business administration management major from Cedar Falls, have been elected president and vice president, respectively, of the Northern Iowa Student Government (NISG).































They received more than 60 percent of the votes in the election, which took place Tuesday, Feb. 22, and Wednesday, Feb. 23. The two will assume office later this spring.































Murphy and Fahmy campaigned on a platform calling for containment of tuition increases, finding more convenient and cheaper ways for students to obtain textbooks, lengthening Thanksgiving break and promoting the Greek system, among other goals.































Other candidates for president and vice president, respectively, were: Ajeh Agbese, a sophomore biology major from Waterloo and Danelle Drayton, a junior psychology major from Des Moines; Sabrina Coronado, a junior family services major from San Antonio, Texas and Amanda Duran, a junior elementary education major from Cedar Rapids; and, Patrick Grassley, a junior social science teacher major from New Hartford, and Kevin Willms, a junior accounting major from Dike.















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WASHINGTON, D.C. -- February 24, 2005 -- Each year, serious playground injuries send more than 200,000 children to seek emergency room assistance and contribute to more than a dozen deaths, according to the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). To help raise awareness of this issue and fund critical playground safety improvements, Stryker Orthopaedics (NYSE: SYK) along with legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus, today announced the launch of The Stryker Challenge, a competitive charity golf tournament open to the general public. Participants are invited to register online at www.strykerchallenge.com.































Funds raised by The Stryker Challenge will be utilized by the National Program for Playground Safety (NPPS) to research safer playground surfacing and resurface existing playgrounds to provide safer play environments for America's children.































'I'm delighted that Stryker has undertaken this important effort and I am proud to be a part of the effort to bring attention to this issue,' said Mr. Nicklaus, who will serve as honorary chairman for the tournament and host the National Final at his home course ï¾– The Bear's Club in West Palm Beach, Florida in October 2005. 'Children need to get outside and exercise, but they need to be able to do it in safe surroundings. I'm a big believer in starting healthy habits early because doing so means they are more likely to stay with you for the rest of your life.'































Beginning this spring, The Stryker Challenge will be held in 11 cities across the country including Miami, Phoenix, Atlanta, Houston, Los Angeles, Boston, Columbus, Philadelphia, San Francisco, New York, and Chicago, with the first tournament being held at Miami's Doral Golf Course on April 26. Winners from each local event will advance to the regional competition.































In 2004, the NPPS visited more than 3,000 playgrounds and gave the U.S. a grade of C+ on safety standards. Statistics indicate that nearly 70 percent of all playground injuries are related to falls, and consequently, an important aspect of reducing playground injuries is to provide cushioned surfaces beneath and around equipment at depths appropriate to equipment height.































'Falls to the surface are the leading cause of injuries on playgrounds,' said Dr. Donna Thompson, executive director of NPPS. 'Approximately 106,000 of all public playground injuries and several deaths each year are related to such falls. Shock absorbing surfaces, however, can slow the momentum of a falling child's body or head and reduce the risk of traumatic, life-threatening injuries.'































The Stryker Challenge will help the NPPS, a nonprofit organization created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to advocate for playground safety and work with local officials to identify potential sites for resurfacing. In addition, officials from selected cities will receive training about playground safety and a site assessment at select playgrounds will take place to ensure that existing structures meet CPSC safety guidelines. Once the site is assessed, NPPS will work with the local community to resurface each playground appropriately.































'Through the Stryker challenge, we are committed to making a substantive difference in raising safety standards at playgrounds in communities across the U.S.,' said Ned Lipes, executive vice president of Stryker Corp. and general chairman of the Stryker Challenge.































Stryker and NPPS hope to create a groundswell of support for playground safety and will be engaging local sponsors in each city to help increase awareness of this important issue. Parents or officials looking for literature on ways to improve safety at playgrounds in their local communities should visit the playgroundsafety.org Web site. Tips include:































Stryker and NPPS hope to create a groundswell of support for playground safety and will be engaging local sponsors in each city to help increase awareness of this important issue. Parents or officials looking for literature on ways to improve safety at playgrounds in their local communities should visit the playgroundsafety.org Web site. Some tips include:















1. Carefully supervise children on the playground to make sure they are safe.















2. Guide children to play on age-appropriate equipment (equipment for ages 2-5 or 5-12).















3. Avoid equipment over the height of 6 feet for preschoolers and 8 feet for school-age children.















4. Make sure loose-fill surfaces around the playground equipment have at least 12 inches of cushioned material.















5. Check that protective surfacing extends at least 6 feet in all direction from play equipment.















6. Examine play equipment for dangerous hardware like protruding bolts and loose fasteners.















7. Make sure spaces that could trap children's heads, such as openings in guardrails, are less than 3.5 inches or greater than 9 inches.















8. Check for sharp points or edges on equipment.















9. Look out for tripping hazards like exposed concrete footings, tree stumps, and rocks.















10. Be a good neighbor; leave the area as you found it.















For more information on The Stryker Challenge, visit www.strykerchallenge.com















About the National Program for Playground Safety















In 1995, the University of Northern Iowa established the National Program for Playground Safety (NPPS) with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Injury Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Since that time, NPPS has become the premier non-profit organization dealing with playground safety information in the United States. Since its beginning in October 1995, NPPS has taken an active part in injury prevention. For more information, visit www.playgroundsafety.org















About Stryker Orthopaedics















Stryker Orthopaedics offers an extensive orthopaedic product portfolio including hip, knee and upper extremity reconstructive devices, bone cement, trauma implants and bone substitutes. For more information about Stryker Orthopaedics, visit www.stryker.com.















About Stryker Corporation















Stryker Corporation develops, manufactures and markets specialty surgical and medical products worldwide, including reconstructive implants, spinal, trauma and craniomaxillofacial systems, the bone growth factor osteogenic protein-1, powered surgical instruments, endoscopic and surgical navigation systems and patient care and handling equipment, and provides outpatient physical therapy services in the United States. For more information visit www.stryker.com.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Psychologist, author and scholar Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, known worldwide for his scholarship on flow and creativity, will deliver two public lectures on the University of Northern Iowa campus Thursday and Friday, March 3 and 4.







He will discuss 'The Creative Person and the Creative Context' at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 3, in the Commons' Slife Ballroom. A reception will precede the presentation, at 6:15 p.m., and a book signing will follow. Friday, March 4, at 3 p.m., he will speak on 'Flow and the Quality of Life' in the Lang Hall Auditorium. A book signing and reception will follow. Both addresses are free and open to the public.



They are part of 'The Changing Face of Iowa: Exploring Creativity in the Community' series of UNI's College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, with support from all UNI undergraduate colleges--Humanities and Fine Arts, Education, Business Administration and Natural Sciences-- and the Rod Library.







In his Thursday evening address, Csikszentmihalyi will draw on a half-century of research to review the family background, personality, motivation and thought processes shared by creative individuals, emphasizing how social and cultural factors contribute to creative achievements.



'If we lack creative solutions, it is, generally, not because of a lack of ideas from creative individuals, but because the infrastructure for recognizing them and implementing them is not functioning well,' he says.







He will focus on the systems perspective of creativity, which describes what the environment must provide in order to allow individuals to make creative contributions.







Regarding his Friday afternoon topic, 'Flow and the Quality of Life,' Csikszentmihalyi has said that one of the central components of a good life is the experience of 'Flow,' which he defines as the total absorption in an activity resulting from a balance between an individual's skills and the challenges of the task. He says individuals can experience Flow in a wide range of pursuits, including art, music, work, athletics, leisure, education and conversation.







This talk will describe the elements of the Flow experience, referring to interviews collected from more than 8,000 respondents around the world, from a variety of cultural and social groups. He will discuss, among other things, why Flow is enjoyable, what makes it happen, why it is relatively rare in everyday life and how individuals and groups can use Flow to be happier in work and leisure.







Csikszentmihalyi is the C.S. and D.J. Davidson Professor of Psychology at the Peter Drucker School of Management at Claremont Graduate University and director of the Quality of Life Research Center. He also is emeritus professor of human development at the University of Chicago, where he chaired the Department of Psychology.







In addition to recently co-founding the Positive Psychology Movement, he is the author of Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience and Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life, as well as Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention; Talented Teenagers: The Roots of Success and Failure and Becoming Adult: How Teenagers Prepare for the World of Work, among other publications.







Csikszentmihalyi will meet with several classes and faculty members while at UNI. For more information, visit http://fp.uni.edu/csbs/csikszentmihalyi.htm or contact Gary Gute, UNI assistant professor of human development, at (319) 273-6149 or e-mail gary.gute@uni.edu.



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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Rib Speaks Out, a double-bill presentation including an anti-suffrage satire and a dramatization of Mark Twain's popular short stories, will usher in March, National Women's History Month, at 8 p.m., Thursday, March 3, in the Communication Arts Center, Room 108, at the University of Northern Iowa.



New York actress Michele LaRue will deliver a vintage lecture Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Monologue, and offer Twain's Eve's Diary to complete the program. Sponsored by Phi Alpha Theta history honorary and the UNI Women's Studies Program, The Rib Speaks Out is open to the public free of charge.







Someone Must Wash the Dishes: An Anti-Suffrage Monologue was written in 1912 -- eight years before women won the vote -- by Marie Jenney Howe, a pro-suffragist. In the 1890s, before taking up her suffragist work in New York City, Howe was a promising Unitarian minister, and served as assistant to Mary A. Safford in Sioux City and Des Moines, Iowa.







'Woman Suffrage is the reform against nature,' declares the heroine of Someone Must Wash the Dishes. 'Ladies, get what you want. Pound pillows. Make a scene. Make home a hell on earth -- but do it in a womanly way! That is so much more dignified and refined than walking up to a ballot box and dropping in a piece of paper!' According to LaRue, Howe's fictional speaker is a charming, guileless enthusiast who sincerely believes that her efforts as a 'womanly woman' will keep the home intact -- and save the nation from anarchy.







Presented alone, Someone Must Wash the Dishes was labeled 'wicked' in New York City and 'side-splitting' in Victorian Cape May, N.J. Performed exclusively by Michele LaRue, it has played throughout the East and frequently in Illinois, most notably at Chicago's Newberry Library.



Eve's Diary, the second half of The Rib Speaks Out, was compiled from several works by Mark Twain: Eve's Diary, Extract Eve's Diary, Papers of the Adam's Family, and various essays on Eve, in which Eve evolved over decades. According to LaRue, the writer's sardonic wit and gleeful anachronisms contrast with Eve's fierce passion for 'an education,' and with the profound growth and sorrow that she learns accompany it.







For more information about The Rib Speaks Out, contact Amy Lawin, program coordinator, UNI Women's Studies Program, at (319) 273-7183 or alawin@uni.edu.



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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A spiritual and religious leadership panel, part of the 'Leaders on Leadership' speaker series, will take place from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Thursday, March 3, in the Schindler Education Center, Room 252 on the University of Northern Iowa campus.



Speakers include Mohammed Fahmy, prayer leader at the Waterloo/Cedar Falls Islamic Center; Susan Manshadi of the Baha'I Faith; Ellen Miller, board member of the World's Window, a project of the Mennonite Church; and, Rabbi Jeff Portman from the Agudas Achim Congregation in Iowa City. Panel members will discuss their path to leadership, influences on their development as a leader and advice for aspiring leaders.



The 'Leaders on Leadership' speaker series features leaders from various professional fields. Upcoming topics include media, human rights and business leadership panels, and a workshop on sexual harassment.



The series, sponsored by the UNI Leadership Studies Program, is free and open to the public. Metered visitor-only parking is available in the lot immediately north of the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center at 50 cents per hour.



For more information on the series, contact Geraldine Perreault, director of UNI's Leadership Studies Program, at (319) 273-6898 or YLA@uni.edu.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa will host its Spring Job and Internship Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wednesday, March 2, in the Maucker Union Old Central Ballroom. The fair will feature employers from more than 80 organizations across the United States, who are recruiting students for internships and full-time positions.



Among the organizations represented are the Internal Revenue Services (IRS), American Express Financial Advisors, the Buckle, and the Cedar Rapids/Iowa City Technology Corridor.



Many of the organizations that will be at the Job and Internship Fair are also participating in UNI's Interview Day, which will take place from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Thursday, March 3. Students can sign up for interviews during the fair on Wednesday. Nearly half of the organizations are interested in meeting with students from all majors during the event, according to Libby Vanderwall, event coordinator for UNI Advising and Career Services. She added there is a waiting list of organizations that would like to participate in the fair.



'To make the Fair work for you, have a purpose and a plan in mind before you arrive,' she advises. 'Talk with several types of the same employer and explore where your major might fit in the job market.'



For a list of recruiting organizations and information about the majors they are seeking, visit www.uni.edu/careercenter.



The event is free and open to the public, and is sponsored by UNI Advising and Career Services.

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February 22, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS -- Members of the University of Northern Iowa's Relay For Life Committee have been busy planning UNI's 2005 Relay For Life fundraiser, which raises money for the American Cancer Society.

Relay For Life is a celebration of life, in honor and in memory of those whose lives have been touched by cancer, according to Grant Erwin of Madrid, chair of UNI's Relay For Life Committee. This is the third year UNI has held Relay For Life; last year the relay raised more than $26,000 and this year the committee's goal is to top $55,000.

(student paragraph)ᆲᆲᆲᆲ _ᆲᆲᆲ

UNI's relay will begin at 6 p.m., Friday, April 8, and continue through 6 a.m., Saturday, April 9. During the relay, teams of eight to 15 people take turns walking or running around the UNI-Dome all night.

For more information, visit www.uni.edu/studentorgs/relayforlife or contact Erwin at grante@uni.edu or (319) 404-0254.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Iowa Electrathon, a unique event in which high school students build and race one-person electric cars, will award a $500 scholarship to a former Iowa Electrathon participant who has been accepted for admission to the University of Northern Iowa.

Qualified students who wish to apply for the scholarship must provide a one-page reference from the team advisor discussing the applicant's involvement and contributions; an essay, PowerPoint or video presentation describing the applicant's team involvement; a one-paragraph teammate reference regarding the applicant's positive attributes and contributions to the team; and an oral interview with the Iowa Electrathon Scholarship Committee. The scholarship is provided through the University of Northern Iowa Foundation.

Applications must be submitted by June 1. The Iowa Electrathon helps participants develop valuable math, science, communication and business skills, according to Patricia Higby, energy educator at the Center for Energy & Environmental Education (CEEE) at UNI.

For more information regarding the scholarship, or to donate to the Iowa Electrathon Scholarship, contact Higby at (319) 273-6012 or e-mail Electrathon@uni.edu.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A group of Peet Junior High eighth-graders developed ideas and drawings for two billboards in Cedar Falls showing what they learned in an after-school program to increase students' awareness of the need to conserve energy. The endeavor is based on a research project through the University of Northern Iowa Center for Energy and Environmental Education (CEEE) and the Iowa Energy Center.

One billboard shows how car tailpipe emissions harm the atmosphere. The second billboard, based on the students' research, shows how much it would cost to drive to high school in the students' chosen 'dream car' that typically gets low gas mileage (12-18 miles per gallon) versus a hybrid car that uses gas and electricity to get high gas mileage (48 miles per gallon). The billboards are displayed in Cedar Falls at 18th & Main Streets and University Avenue & Rownd Street.

Jack Yates, UNI professor of psychology and project director, says, 'Students in this age group are making critical decisions and establishing life-long habits regarding energy use and energy conservation. The project is focused on increasing students' own awareness of energy issues and choices, and helping them determine a personal plan for making choices about energy use.'

The project is sponsored by the Iowa Energy Center through the UNI CEEE, with assistance from University Marketing & Public Relations at UNI and Lamar Advertising. Project coordinator, working with Jack Yates, is Carole Shelley Yates.

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February 21, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Jan Hanish, director of Maucker Union, has been named assistant vice president for event management at the University of Northern Iowa. According to Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration & finance, this is a first for UNI.















'Our goal is to make better use of facilities and services to make UNI more of a destination,' explained Schellhardt. 'Jan's job will be to work with Cedar Valley businesses and organizations and key departments on campus to help make UNI a more welcoming venue. She'll guide everything from how we use facilities and book events, to how we support large-scale conferences. This will help UNI be more efficient and effective, and it will have a positive impact on the local economy. Jan's educational background, experience and success at UNI make her ideally suited for this important role.'















The appointment is effective March 1.















Hanish has been the director of Maucker Union since 1997 and has been employed at UNI since 1977. She holds a Ph.D. in higher education administration from the University of Iowa. She received master's and bachelor's degrees in Spanish from UNI.















Guy Sims, associate director of Maucker Union, has been named interim director.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The year 2005 has been declared the 'World Year of Physics.' The University of Northern Iowa Department of Physics will continue its tradition of hosting the UNI/Area Education Agency 267 Regional Physics Olympics, from 9 a.m. to noon, in the UNI-Dome, Thursday, Feb. 24.







High school students from Cedar Falls, Dunkerton Dike-New Hartford, Jesup, Fairbank, Gilbertville, Gladbrook-Reinbeck, Janesville, La Porte City, Nashua-Plainfield, Sumner, Traer, Waterloo, Winthrop and other nearby areas are expected to participate. About 300 students from 17 different schools participated in last year's competition.







According to Larry Escalada, UNI associate professor of physics and competition coordinator, student teams will compete in events, including the self-propelled catapult, mouse-trap car, toothpick bridge, soda-straw arm and water-heater, using devices they constructed from everyday materials.







The two school teams with the highest total scores from all five events will qualify for the state competition at the Drake University Olmstead Center, in Des Moines, on April 13.



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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Nine University of Northern Iowa students are participating in the National Student Exchange (NSE) program for the spring 2005 semester. They are among 41 UNI students participating in the NSE program during all or part of the 2004-2005 academic year. The NSE program allows students to study at one of 168 colleges and universities in the United States while paying UNI tuition.

Spring 2005 NSE program participants include ___(NAME)___, a ___(CLASSIFICATION/MAJOR)___ major from ___(HOMETOWN)___, son/daughter of ___(PARENT'S NAMES)___ attending ___(SCHOOL)___.

To be eligible for the program students must have a UNI and cumulative grade-point average of 2.75; completed at least 30 hours, but not more than 85 hours of coursework at the time of the exchange; be a full-time student, a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the United States and be in good standing, as defined by UNI.

As a result of participating in the exchange program, students usually acquire a broader perspective of various social, educational and cultural patterns in other areas of the United States, according to Karen Cunningham, UNI NSE coordinator.

For more information about the NSE program, contact Karen Cunningham at (319) 273-2504.

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February 20, 2005 - 6:00pm

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Monday, Feb. 21

Eyes on the Prize Documentary Series-Vol. 4: 'Power!' and 'The Promised Land' will be shown at 7 p.m. in the Center for Multicultural Education. Contact: Michael Blackwell, UNI director of multicultural education, (319) 273-2250.



Daryl Smith, UNI professor of biology and director of the Native Roadside Vegetation Center, will present 'America's Lost Landscape: The Tallgrass Prairie,' a feature-length documentary of the impact of settlers on the prairie, at 7 p.m., in the CEEE Auditorium. Contact: Patricia Higby, energy educator, UNI Center for Energy and Environmental Education, (319) 273-6012.

Yawo Attivor from West Africa will play a mix of Afro-funk, R&B, reggae, rock and jazz at 7 p.m. in the KUNI studio, CAC, third floor. Contact: Karen Impola, UNI senior producer, 'Folkways,' UNI Broadcasting Services, (319) 273-6463.

Tuesday, Feb. 22

'Afrofunk Adventures By Yawo,' a blend of Afro-Cuban and funky music, will take place at noon in the Maucker Union Hemisphere Lounge. Sponsored by the Center for Multicultural Education. Contact: Lydia Perez Roberts, UNI CME program assistant, (319) 273-2250.

School Counselors and Administrators Annual Conference will take place from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Five Sullivan Brothers Convention Center, Waterloo. More than 100 counselors and administrators are expected to attend this conference, sponsored by the University of Northern Iowa Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling & Postsecondary Education. Contact: Ann Vernon, UNI professor of education and director of counseling education, (319) 273-2226.

Tuesday, Feb. 22 and Wednesday, Feb. 23

Four pairs of students are vying for president and vice president of Northern Iowa Student Government in online elections Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 22 and 23. Voting is from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days, with senatorial candidates representing various constituencies also on the ballot. Results will be tabulated, beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday, with the winners announced later that evening. Media interested in results that evening should call Ashley Hartkemeyer, NISG election commissioner, between 6 and 7 p.m. Wednesday, at (319) 273-2650, to make arrangements to get the information following final tabulation. Contact: Ashley Hartkemeyer, NISG election commissioner, (319)

273-2650, or e-mail ashley05@uni.edu

Wednesday, Feb. 23

Eyes on the Prize Documentary Series-Vol. 5: 'Ain't Gonna Shuffle No More' and 'A Nation of Law?' will be shown in the Center for Multicultural Education at 8 a.m., 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Contact: Michael Blackwell, UNI director of multicultural education, (319) 273-2250.



Friday, Feb. 25

Chinese New Year Festival will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. in Maucker Union Old Central Ballroom A, Participants can learn about Chinese culture and enjoy free food, entertainment, crafts and games. Contact: Laura Tapper, (319) 222-3082.

Comedy Show featuring Steve Brown, Big Sean and Tiny, will take place at 8 p.m. in Lang Hall Auditorium. Sponsored by the UNI Entertainment Committee. Contact: Guy Sims, associate director, Maucker Union, (319) 273-2683.

Friday, Feb. 25 and Saturday, Feb. 26

A workshop on Capoeira, a martial art and dance form, originally from Brazil, that is used to promote physical fitness and grace of movement, will be offered from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.. Friday, in the Wellness & Recreation Center's second floor basketball courts 5 and 6. An African dance workshop will be held from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, in the WRC dance studio. The workshops will be led by visiting capoeira artists from Brazil and artists from the National Song and Dance Company of Mozambique. No experience is necessary and both workshops are open to all interested persons. There is a $15 fee for one workshop or $25 for both. Contact: Pedro Zogaib, UNI adjunct instructor in physical education, at (319) 268-0107, or Francesca Zogaib at (319) 268-0107 or e-mail hanson@uni.edu.

Saturday, Feb. 26

'Bringing Africa and Its Diaspora Together: Capoeira, Maculel�, Samba and Traditional Mozambican Dance,' will be performed at 2 p.m. in the GBPAC Davis Hall, free of charge. Capoeira is a martial art integrated with dance, ritual and gravity-defying acrobatics. Contact: Pedro Zogaib or Francesca Zogaib (see previous entry contact information).

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Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-6728

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Special events planned for SUE'S first week in Iowa

Friday, Feb. 25 and Monday, Feb. 28, SUE will arrive in Cedar Falls. The enormous exhibit comes packaged in three semi-trucks and 42 crates, accompanied by a professional exhibit technician from The Field Museum, Chicago. Several volunteers will be on hand to help unload and piece together the 42-foot long skeleton. The exhibit consists of a replica of the largest, most complete and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered, along with nine interactive learning stations, and separate replica of SUE's skull. The fossil takes just four hours to put together, but will remain headless until the ceremonial SAR event held on March 1. (see below)



Tuesday, March 1, SAR (Some Assembly Required) Party in appreciation of all volunteers, SUE committee members, and media. This will be an event for invited guests only, from 6 to 8 p.m., with a ceremonial attachment of SUE's head at 7 p.m.

*NOTE: This is a special opportunity for media to cover the assembly of the skeleton. Please notify The Museum (call Melissa at 319-273-6925) about who will be covering this event from your organization.

Friday, March 4, Donor Reception in appreciation of monetary and in-kind gifts given for this exhibition. The reception will be from 6 to 8 p.m. at the SUE exhibit site, by invitation only. Guests will enjoy a first glimpse at the wonderful exhibit they helped create, as well as wine, hors d'oeuvres and desserts. (Media representatives are welcome to cover this event.)

Saturday, March 5, Grand Opening of 'A T. rex Named SUE'. This will be the first opportunity for the general public to visit SUE in Cedar Falls. There will be an opening ceremony with speech and ribbon cutting at 10 a.m. Guests include Mayor Jon Crews of Cedar Falls, Mayor Tim Hurley of Waterloo and Mayor John Mardis of Evansdale. In honor of the exhibit, they will proclaim March as 'Dinosaur Month' for their cities. McDonald's? Corporation is a major sponsor of 'A T. rex Named SUE' on a national level and will provide a visit from Ronald McDonald for the opening day. Ronald will lead the first visiting group through the exhibit.

Tuesday, March 8, Educator Open House. Teachers from across the state are invited to visit 'A T. rex Named SUE' free of charge with school I.D. Open House is from 4 to 8 p.m., and will provide educators information about what their students will learn from the exhibit and its many interactive learning stations. They also will learn about the educational opportunities available free of charge at the additional exhibit, DINOS 101, located at the UNI Museum, 3209 Hudson Road, Cedar Falls. Teachers are asked to RSVP at (319) 273-2188 for this event by March 1.



'A T. rex Named SUE' was created by The Field Museum, Chicago, and made possible through the generosity of McDonald'sï¾® Corporation.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Rod Library has selected Carly DeGraeve of Cedar Falls as employee of the month for February 2005.

DeGraeve, a senior textiles and apparels major, is a student assistant in the Technical Services Department. Her primary responsibilities are in the cataloging section of the department, where she works on special projects and library statistics. She has worked at the Rod Library for three years.

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