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News Release Archive

December 4, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's UNISTA (UNI Student Theatre Association), will present 'The Best of Broadway,' at 7:30 p.m., Friday, Dec. 12 and Saturday, Dec. 13, in the Strayer-Wood Theatre.

'The Best of Broadway,' an evening of song and dance, is a revue of Broadway show tunes. The performance will include songs from 'Cabaret,' 'Cats,' 'Oklahoma,' 'My Fair Lady,' 'Chicago,' 'Hair Spray,' 'Annie,' 'Rent,' 'The Wiz' and 'Jekyll and Hyde.'

Cost of admission is $4. For more information contact the Strayer-Wood Theatre box office at (319) 273-6381.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Prairie Celebration,' the original watercolor commissioned to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the UNI Botanical Preserves Founders ceremony and celebration is available for purchase.

According to Billie Hemmer-Callahan, horticulturist with the UNI Biology Botanical Center and Preserves, artist Megan Thorne, a UNI graduate from Traer, 'has perfectly captured the poetic beauty of the UNI prairie in all its splendor and perfection.'

Prints are available for purchase now through Dec. 19. The cost of an 8- by 10-inch print is $10. Prints may be ordered by calling the Botanical Center office at (319) 273-2247. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. To view the print visit http://www.bio.uni.edu/botanicalcenter/GiftShop.html.

December 3, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'U.S. Policy in Colombia' will be the subject of a 7 p.m. lecture Monday, Dec. 8, in the Communication Arts Center, Room 108, at the University of Northern Iowa.

The presentation, by Lisa Haugaard, executive director of the Latin America Working Group (LAWG), is free and open to the public.

Haugaard has been with the LAWG since 1993, and became its executive director in June 2002. With the LAWG she has worked on Colombian and Central American policy, development assistance and other topics. She has testified before the U.S. Congress and produced numerous reports and articles on U.S.-Latin American policy.

Prior to her work at the LAWG, Haugaard was executive director of the Central America Historical Institute in Washington, D.C.; writer, editor and translator for the Jesuit Instituto Historico Centroamericano in Managua, Nicaragua; and editor for major US book publishers.

She holds a bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College, a master's degree in Latin American studies from New York University and was a Fulbright scholar in Central America.

The Latin America Working Group is one of the nation's longest standing coalitions dedicated to foreign policy. As a coalition, LAWG represents the interests of over 60 major religious, humanitarian, grassroots and policy organizations to decision makers in Washington.



For more information contact John Grinstead, UNI assistant professor of modern languages, at (319) 273-2417.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Interpreters Theatre will present 'The Streets are Burning: The '68 Chicago Eight Conspiracy Trial,' Wednesday through Saturday, Dec.

10 - 13, in Lang Hall, Room 40. Performances begin at 7:30 p.m.

'The Streets are Burning,' is the story of the 1968 citywide riots that occurred when the Chicago Police met student protesters of the Vietnam War with violence. Eight men were arrested and charged with planning and inciting the demonstrations that occurred. The production revisits the trial of such revolutionaries as Abbie Hoffman, Bobby Seale and Rennie Davis, as they fought for their rights, and those of the American people.



UNI graduate Emily Josephson from Shenandoah, now a second year graduate student in communication studies, has adapted and written this performance from the original trial transcript of the 1968 Chicago conspiracy trial as a portion of her master's thesis. This will be the second production Josephson has written and directed for the UNI Interpreters Theatre.

The UNI Interpreters Theatre program is directed by Karen Mitchell, Interpreters Theatre artistic director, and Paul Siddens, associate professor of communication studies.

The performances are free and open to the public, but seating is limited. For more information contact Karen Mitchell at (319) 273-2640.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa student, Allyson Moore, a senior public relations major and journalism minor from Champlin, Minn., formerly from Urbandale, recently won the student writing competition at the 2003 Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) Career Day in Kansas City.



The writing contest included a news release, strategy for targeting media outlets, and event planning. Moore was awarded first place and $300 for herself and $300 for the UNI PRSSA chapter.

The day was sponsored by the Greater Kansas City chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), and was designed to help students prepare for upcoming job searches, provide networking and offer tips on resumes and interviewing.

Moore, a 1999 graduate of West Des Moines Valley High School, will graduate from UNI Dec. 20. She is the daughter of Michael and Patricia Moore, now of Champlin. She has had undergraduate internships at Generations Incorporated in Des Moines, North American Review in Cedar Falls, Hanser & Associates Public Relations in Des Moines, Padilla Speer Beardsley Public Relations in Minneapolis, and UNI's Office of University Marketing & Public Relations.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Student Government (NISG) President and Speaker of the Senate recently selected, and the senate approved, several students to fill vacancies on the NISG Supreme Court. The Supreme Court consists of a chief justice and four associate justices.



Each of the following individuals was selected to be an associate justice on the court; Bridget Gongol, daughter of Mary and Verne Gongol, a freshman history major from West Des Moines; Anthony Boggs, son of Marilyn and Alva Boggs, a junior social science teaching major from Seymour; and Joseph Anderson, son of Daun Keefe and Keith Anderson, a junior communications major from Toledo.

The new justices joined associate justice John Harrenstein, a junior organizational communication major from Clear Lake, and chief justice Jacob McCoy, a senior actuarial science major from Des Moines.

The court's purpose is to review the actions of the other two branches of NISG and serve as the primary body for arbitration among student organizations recognized by the Senate. Four justices and a chief justice serve on the court for the duration of their enrollment at UNI.

December 2, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Ten University of Northern Iowa ROTC students recently completed the annual Ranger Challenge at Ft. McCoy in Wisconsin. The challenge is designed to test the best cadets in the nation physically and mentally.



Day one of the three-day competition, Oct. 17 ï¾– 19, consisted of a written exam while days two and three consisted of physical events.

Students completed seven rigorous events that included: an Army physical fitness test, orienteering, weapons disassemble/assemble, grenade assault course, one-rope bridge and rifle marksmanship and a 10-kilometer road march.

UNI took one team to this year's Ranger Challenge and competed against 13 schools and 20 teams. The team placed sixth in the Army physical fitness test, eighth in the M16A2 basic rifle marksmanship, 11th in orienteering and 12th in the 10-kilometer road march. Overall, the UNI team placed 13th.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Two University of Northern Iowa students were recognized at this year's International Conference of Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE).

Jeremiah Gray, a senior leisure services major from Denison, was one of eight individuals awarded an ICORE scholarship. Gray also was elected national student representative for the Association of Outdoor Recreation and Education (AORE).

Luke Bartlett, a graduate student in leisure services management from Cedar Falls, was the recipient of the Bill March Student Achievement Award. Bartlett was the only student selected for this honor, which recognizes the nation's outstanding student leader.

The 2004 ICORE planning committee includes Gray, Bartlett; and Andy Martin, UNI Wellness and Recreation Services outdoors coordinator. The conference will take place in Tennessee.

December 1, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Gallery of Art will present 'BFA Exhibition,' from Saturday, Dec.13 through Saturday, Dec. 20. Graduating artists will host a reception on Dec. 13, from 7 to 9 p.m.

The following four artists are participating in this exhibition in partial fulfillment of their bachelor of fine arts (B.F.A.) degrees: Angela Foster of Adel, Trevor Hanel of Burlington, Angela Pease of Cedar Falls, and Justin Richert of Anita and Atlantic.

Angela Foster is a double major in art education and in graphic design. Her exhibition will highlight the use of typography and page layout in the design of brochures and booklets. Trevor Hanel is a painting major whose series 'From Here To There' represents a spiritual journey composed of isolated and contemplative 'scapes. After receiving his B.F.A. at UNI, he plans to continue his studies in Hungary.



Angela Pease's exhibition will consist of one large-scale installation as well as smaller pieces made from largely synthetic materials, all of which question modern perceptions of the house and home. She says one of her major career influences was six weeks spent at the Yale/Norfolk Summer School of Art. Justin Richert is a ceramics major who came to UNI as a scholarship student in the fall of 1999. His work references historical pottery forms integrated with his personal interests in process, form, texture and the responsive nature of clay.

The exhibition and reception are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday; and noon to 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. The gallery is located at the corner of Hudson Road and West 27th Street, on the main floor of the Kamerick Art Building. For more information, call (319) 273-3095 or visit www.uni.edu/artdept/gallery/.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Thirteen students recently were inducted into the University of Northern Iowa's Gamma Phi chapter of the National Order of Omega Greek honor society. Order of Omega recognizes fraternity and sorority members for outstanding dedication to the university and the Greek community, leadership and academic skills. Members must have a cumulative GPA of 3.25 or higher.

Among the 13 inductees was (NAME), a (CLASSIFICATION), (MAJOR) major from (HOMETOWN).

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Joyce Boike, a sophomore math education major from Dike, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu.

Boike is actively involved with the honor society Phi Eta Sigma, secretary of Hageman Hall Senate, and tutors math students.

November 30, 2003 - 6:00pm

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Mistakes, lies and politics



On Dec. 5, 1876, President Ulysses S. Grant delivered his speech of apology to Congress. He claimed mistakes he made while in office were due to inexperience and were 'errors of judgment, not intent.' More than 120 years later, things have changed.

'Grant falls into a rare category of leaders who stood up and admitted their mistakes,' says Gerri Perreault, associate professor and director of leadership studies at the University of Northern Iowa. 'These days, leaders generally do not admit or apologize for errors.'

Perreault says that whether due to arrogance, ego, or fear of political fallout, the public is often subjected to weeks of denials and cries of 'not guilty' when ethical wrong-doings are uncovered. 'In general, the public appreciates honesty,' Perreault explains. 'In general, if someone makes a mistake, it's better to admit it and move on. The press will drop the story much faster.'

Contact:

Geraldine Perreault, associate professor and director of leadership studies, (319) 273-6898, Geraldine.Perreault@uni.edu

Melissa Barber, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Holiday stress compounded by return of U.S. servicemen and women

Despite the fact that they are supposed to be a festive, joyous time of year, the holidays are often rife with stress and difficulty. 'We tend to romanticize this time of year, and it's hard to meet those expectations,' says David Towle, director of UNI's Counseling Center. Compounding the situation this year will be the return of many servicemen and women, on leave for the holidays. 'Anytime someone comes home from being deployed in the military, there are lots of challenges in the transition,' Towle says. 'Primarily, because everyone has changed and the situation has changed. The people left behind might have had to do some things differently and taken on new responsibilities. The individual who has been deployed is changed by his or her experience. You're not able to pick up where you left off. You have to recognize that things will be different.'

Towle says it's important for families to communicate openly about their feelings, hopes and expectations. 'And don't focus so much on the fantasy of what you hope the reunion will be like. Reassure one another that, even though everyone has gone through changes, there is still appreciation for the sacrifices each has made.'

Contact:

David Towle, director, UNI Counseling Center, (319) 273-2676, david.towle@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Stress levels can remain tolerable at the holidays

With the holiday season often comes shopping, baking, entertaining, travel, seldom-seen friends and relatives and, for many, increased stress. Ken Jacobsen, mental health counselor at the University of Northern Iowa, offers some tips to reduce that stress and enjoy the month ahead.

'A good place to start is by remembering the concept that 'less is likely to be more,'' he says. 'Try to avoid feeling that proverbial pressure to be all things and do all things possible. Examine the 'have-tos' and 'must-dos' that make the holidays so stressful and see where you might make changes.'

Jacobsen also says it's important to find some respite alone, or as close to alone as possible. He can offer pointers for how to deal with people you don't like very well but have to tolerate because you're related.

Contacts:

Ken Jacobsen, mental health counselor, UNI Counseling Center, (319) 273-2676 (department office); Kenneth.Jacobsen@uni.edu (e-mail)

Vicki Grimes, Office of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Megan Hass, a junior elementary education middle school endorsement major from Davenport, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu.

Hass has held various officer positions in her residence hall, and now serves as a resident assistant at Rider Hall.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring local twins Amy and Andrea Beckman as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, theirs can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu.



Amy is a freshman marketing major, and works on campus as a student assistant in the UNI marketing department. Andrea, a freshman interior design major, works in the UNI design, family, and consumer science department. Quincy, Ill is their hometown.

November 25, 2003 - 6:00pm

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Celebrate the Seasons, a holiday program featuring cultural celebrations that take place during this time of year, will be held at the University of Northern Iowa at 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 4.

Holidays such as Ramadan, Hanukkah, Christmas, Diwali, Kwanzaa and Posadas will be highlighted through displays, song, dance and narrations in the Maucker Union Coffeehouse.

Celebrate the Seasons is hosted by the Student Life Team and Maucker Union Student Activities.

Following the program there will be a visit from Santa. From 7 to 9 p.m. will be sleigh rides across campus. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Guy Sims, associate director of Maucker Union, at (319) 273-2683.

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The University of Northern Iowa chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, an international English honor society, will host the lecture, 'VONNEGUT (is not equal to) WAR,' at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 3 in the Seerley Hall Great Reading Room.

Jerome Klinkowitz, professor of English at UNI, and a well-known critic of post-World War II American literature, will discuss new work of Kurt Vonnegut and war. Klinkowitz is a co-editor of 'The Norton Anthology of American Literature,' a text used at many universities.

According to Jesse Swan, adviser for Sigma Tau Delta, Klinkowitz is the premier expert on Vonnegut. The talk will present new work Klinkowitz is conducting with and about Vonnegut, concerning culture, language, war and Vonnegut's thinking and current writing on these topics.

Sigma Tau Delta is an honor society for scholars and writers of English literature around the world. UNI has sponsored a chapter for more than two decades, and this year inducted 11 students into the society.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Kevin Koppes, president of Sigma Tau Delta, at kevitron@uni.edu.

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Picturing the Public Arguments Against Suffrage: 1909 Anti-suffrage Postcards,' will be the topic of the next CROW Forum lecture at noon, Monday, Dec. 1, in Baker Hall, Room 161, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

The lecture will be given by Catherine Palczewski, UNI professor of communication studies. Palczewski says that, though today, we may think of postcards as a throw-away, at the beginning of the 20th century they were the Internet of the day-- an inexpensive way to send visual images and short messages. Collecting them was a social phenomenon in this 'Golden Age of Postcards' and families spent extensive amounts of time collecting albums of them.

While in 1909, there were hundreds of suffrage-related postcards supporting both sides of the issue of granting women the right to vote, she will discuss a 12-card anti-suffrage series produced that year by one of the companies, looking at the visual versus the verbal arguments in the social discourse.

'These cards have incredibly wonderful graphics, but what is intriguing about them is that they represent an argument not present in the literature and verbal discourse of the day, that men would be feminized,' she says. 'On one postcard, men are doing dishes while taking care of dozens of infants, while another takes the classic Russian iconic version of the Madonna and child, with the image of a man rather than the traditional Mother Mary.'

The CROW (Current Research on Women) Forum series is sponsored by UNI's Graduate Program in Women's Studies. Admission is free and open to the public.

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Three University of Northern Iowa staff members received the 2003 Regents Award for Staff Excellence at a dinner hosted earlier this month by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa.

Recipients were Donna Vinton, associate director of the Career Center; Randy Pilkington, executive director of Business and Community Services and director of the Institute for Decision Making; and Jane Close, clerk IV at the Physical Plant.

According to her nominators, Vinton, who has been with the Career Center since 1989, 'is a model of commitment to excellence' and 'has a comprehensive vision of career development that encompasses the unique role of liberal arts.'

As associate director of the Career Center, Vinton selects, trains and supervises the Peer Assistant Program; develops curriculum and oversees the offering of the Career Decision Making course; and serves as the training facilitator for Career Development Facilitator Training. She also took a lead role in developing the Career Center Web site.

Pilkington, who has worked for UNI for 15 years, has been in his current position since 1999. As part of his job, Pilkington directly oversees the Ag-Based Industrial Lubricants Program (ABIL), the John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center, the Small Business Development Center, the Iowa Waste Reduction Center, the Management and Professional Development Center, Strategic Marketing Services and the Regional Business Center.

His nominator referred to him as 'a tireless worker, a dedicated professional and a committed citizen with boundless energy and enthusiasm. He is a model of cooperative efforts, of collaboration, of bringing people together to maximize results.'

Close began working at UNI in 1982 as an account clerk in Plant Services Administration. Four years later, she was promoted to clerk IV for Energy Conservation Management in Plant Services. Close serves on the executive board of the UNI Supervisory and Confidential Personnel, is a member of the Regents Inter-institutional Supervisory and Confidential Council, the Staff Strategic Plan Review Committee, the University Strategic Plan Reconciliation Committee, the Association of Educational Office Professionals, the UNI Connection, Habitat for Humanity and the American Association of University Women.

One nominator wrote that she 'takes a very proactive approach to UNI's 'campus politics.' She is not hesitant to become involved and take on the leadership roles that many other individuals shy away from.'

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The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Thomas Rinehart, a senior biology/chemistry major from Marshalltown, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, his can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu.

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The University of Northern Iowa's Center for Multicultural Education will host a conversation with the authors of 'Shifting: The Double Lives of Black Women in America,' at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4 in the center's new home on the top floor of Maucker Union.

The authors are Kumea Shorter-Gooden, a licensed psychologist in private practice and a professor at the California School of Professional Psychology of Alliant International University in Los Angeles; and Charisse Jones, a national correspondent for 'USA Today,' former staff writer for the 'New York Times' and the 'Los Angeles Times,' contributing writer for 'Essence' magazine, and former commentator for National Public Radio.

According to Michael Blackwell, UNI director of multicultural education, the book is based on the African American Women's Voices Project initiated by the authors. The project recorded the experiences of more than 300 survey respondents and 70 interviewees. Its premise is that black women are forced, due to bigotry regarding race and gender, to constantly 'shift' between identities. The authors write, 'From one moment to the next, they change their outward behavior, attitude, or tone, shifting 'White,' then shifting 'Black' again, shifting 'corporate,' shifting 'cool.' '

The event is free and open to the public.

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November 24, 2003 - 6:00pm

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Microsoft Excel Shortcuts,' a course to improve Excel efficiency, will be offered by the University of Northern Iowa Regional Business Center (RBC), in partnership with Ketels Contract Training.

The course will take place from 8:30 a.m. to noon, Friday, Dec. 5, at the RBC office, 212 E. Fourth St., Waterloo, and will be taught by Chris McGregor-Case.

A second Microsoft course, 'Microsoft Word Shortcuts,' a course to improve Word efficiency, will be offered from 8:30 a.m. to noon, Friday, Dec. 12. Case will also teach this course. Both courses are for those who have had previous training and/or use the programs regularly.

The cost is $99 per course. The registration deadline for 'Microsoft Excel Shortcuts' is Tuesday, Dec. 2. The deadline for 'Microsoft Word Shortcuts' is Tuesday, Dec. 9.

For more information, contact the UNI RBC at (319) 236-8123, or visit www.unirbc.org.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature,' the second lecture in this year's Hearst Lecture Series at the University of Northern Iowa, will be presented at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 3, in Lang Auditorium at UNI.

Steven Pinker, one of the world's leading cognitive scientists and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), will deliver the address. The series is sponsored by the UNI Department of Communicative Disorders, host for this year's series that is centered around the theme, 'Human Communication: Science and Disorders.'

Pinker's research on visual cognition and the psychology of language received the Troland Award from the National Academy of Science and the Golden Plate award from the American Academy of Achievement. He is among 'Newsweek's' 100 Americans for the Next Century and is included in 'Esquire's' Register of Outstanding Men and Women.

He holds a B.A. from McGill University and a Ph.D. in psychology from Harvard. He served on the faculties of Harvard and Stanford Universities for a year each before moving to MIT and will shortly assume a professorship at Harvard University.

Pinker is the author of the 1998 Pulitzer finalist 'How the Mind Works.' His newest book, 'The Blank Slate,' was a finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Non-fiction and a 'New York Times' Book Review Notable Book-of-the-Year. His other books include 'The Language Instinct,' 'Words' and 'Rules.' Pinker has published academic and popular articles in 'The New York Times,' 'Nature' and 'Time.'

A reception and book signing will follow Pinker's address. The event is free and open to the public.

The Hearst Lecture Series is supported by the Meryl Norton Hearst Chair in the UNI College of Humanities and Fine Arts. It was created by an endowment from James Schell Hearst, author, poet and professor of creative writing at UNI from 1941 until his retirement in 1975. The series engages scholars and experts from outside the university to share their expertise, as well as their viewpoints and theoretical frameworks.

The next speaker in the series, on Feb. 20, 2004, will be G. Bradley Schaefer speaking on clinical genetics.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– The University of Northern Iowa's Department of Political Science will sponsor a mock caucus from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4, in the Presidential Room of Maucker Union.

Phil Mauceri, interim head of political science, said the event is part of the department's efforts to promote civic education and citizenship. After introductory comments, participants will be divided into two groups, Democrats and Republicans, to review the purpose and procedures of the caucus system with their party representatives.

For more information, contact Mauceri, (319) 273-2528.

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November 23, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Men's Soccer Club recently completed its season with a fifth-place finish at the University of Minnesota conference tournament in the Twin Cities. UNI beat the University of Wisconsin-Stout 2-0, Mankato State 3-1 and lost to Moorehead State 0-1. There were 12 teams competing in the conference.

Coached by Chris Kowalski, instructor in the School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, this is the second year of conference competition for the club. Last year, the team finished second in the conference and 15th in the nation.

There are 22 men on UNI's team, including president Josh Printz, a sophomore business administration major from Pella; and team captains Brady Jacobson, a senior business major from Johnston; Dan Dickenson, a senior accounting major from Cedar Rapids; Chris Schulte, a senior art major from Fort Madison; and Rod Schumacher, a senior construction management major from Dubuque.

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When 'Playboy' magazine debuted on Dec. 1, 1953, it aimed to remove the taboo nature of certain subjects -- like female nudity -- and make them respectable. 'It wasn't just a pornographic magazine, but one that featured semi-nudity and articles on an intellectual plane. And it also attempted to make the philosophical argument that there's nothing wrong with this,' explains Dean Kruckeberg, professor of communication studies. He attributes the magazine's longevity and many imitators to the fact that it's always been a quality product, from the paper it's printed on to design to editorial content to photography. 'By any standard, it's an excellent periodical. And that gives it credibility. People can pick this up and say 'Look, I can look at dirty pictures of women and still be an intellectual and sophisticated human being.''

He admits though, that women who consider Playboy-type magazines degrading in their portrayals of women are probably right. 'I think any woman who appears in these magazines is viewed with some level of exploitation, even if it's voluntary exploitation,' he says. 'You aren't looking at the woman and wondering what her major is, or what her views on world peace might be.'

Contacts:

Dean Kruckeberg, professor of communication studies, (319) 273-2501, 266-5842, dean.kruckeberg@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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Mid-19th century women topic of new book

Women accused of murder fascinated 19th-century Americans, and spectators crowded into courtrooms to witness their trials. Female lecturers and Civil War workers striving to improve society also attracted enormous attention. The era's most controversial women seemed to either publicly maintain American morality, or publicly betray it. Why did such women -- both criminals and caretakers -- simultaneously captivate and trouble America?

These and other issues are explored in a new book by Barbara Cutter, UNI assistant professor of history, 'Domestic Devils, Battlefield Angels: The Radicalism of American Womanhood, 1830-1865,' released in October by Northern Illinois University Press. 'Antebellum Americans believed that proper women should be virtuous, but the meaning of feminine virtue was highly contested,' says Cutter. 'One minister condemned abolitionist Abby Kelley as a 'servant of Satan' for giving public lectures against slavery, but others asserted that Kelley did her duty as a moral woman by protesting an unjust system. In a different arena, even prostitutes could serve as examples of virtue if they were perceived as working to feed their families.'

Contacts:

Barbara Cutter, assistant professor of history, (319) 273-5909, 273-2097, Barbara.Cutter@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, Office of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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House of Saud-- the house of cards?

Osama bin Laden has long called for the overthrow of the Saudi royal family for allowing American bases in this holiest land of Islam, home to Mecca. For years, according to Dhirendra Vajpeyi, University of Northern Iowa professor of political science, a lot of Saudi money, both private and from the royal family, has supported all sorts of shady activities in promoting Islamic fundamentalism such as the Taliban and other terrorist groups active in places such as Afghanistan, Chechnya, Pakistan, India and Palestine, in the hope of buying them off and avoiding trouble at home.

But the troubles they had helped to spread elsewhere are now 'coming home to roost,' Vajpeyi says, adding that the recent explosion in Riyahd confirms that. 'Extreme Islamic fundamentalists say the House of Saud has compromised the purity of Islam and polluted its soul by allowing these Western Christians to influence their country. The government has funded religious schools --madrasas-- in its own and other countries in Asia, Europe and Africa, that teach total intolerance. Any intrusion by outsiders, especially Americans, their form of dress, politics and views on human rights (the status of women, secularism) should not be tolerated. So, they believe it's their sacred duty to topple the government of the House of Saud, since the royal family and its government have supported their presence on Saudi soil.'

Adding to the Saudi government's problems, Vajpeyi says, is that after Sept. 11, when it was discovered that most of the terrorist hijackers that day were Saudi citizens, U.S. politicians and others began to question support of the Saudis.

Dhirendra Vajpeyi, UNI professor of political science, (319) 273-2275, (319) 273-2039, Dhirendra.Vajpeyi@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Five University of Northern Iowa students and two faculty members received top honors at the Oct. 21 ï¾– 26 meeting of the International Association of Education and Communications Technology (IAECT), in Anaheim, Calif.

Kim Carter, a graduate student pursuing a doctor of education, from New Orleans, was awarded the West McJulien Graduate Student award. ReGina Rankins, a graduate student majoring in performance and training technology, from New Orleans, was elected Secretary-Treasurer of the AECT Minorities and Media Committee.

Mary Herring, UNI assistant professor of educational technology, was elected as chairperson of AECT's Standards and Accreditation Committee. Ana Donaldson, UNI assistant professor of educational technology, received the Presidential Service Award.

Aretha Davids, a graduate student majoring in educational technology, from Waterloo, Chieko Homma, a graduate student majoring in educational technology, from Tokyo, and Adam Benge, a senior studying industrial technology and graphic communication, of Ankeny, were also recognized. The three received first place honors for their video, '1000 Candles 1000 Cranes,' in the International Student Media Festival. The video tells the story of an American woman and a Japanese woman who lost their families during World War II.

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November 19, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Men's Soccer Club has ended its outdoor soccer season, with a record of 8-7-0. The team will begin practice next month for its indoor season.

The team recently attended a regional tournament in Woodbury, Minn., hosted by the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. The team lost 1-0 to Moorehead State, beat the University of Wisconsin-Stout 2-0, and beat Mankato State 3-1. The team placed fifth overall out of the 12 competing teams.

According to the team's student president, Josh Printz of Pella, the team will compete in additional indoor tournaments throughout the winter and spring. Last year, the club was ranked in the top 15 in the nation for club sports.

To obtain a list of the soccer players, please contact the office of University Marketing & Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa will present 'Using Technology to Improve Teacher Quality for Iowa,' a free panel discussion for educators and school administrators at 6:30 p.m., Dec. 3, at the West Des Moines Marriott.

The discussion will cover the importance of technology in 21st century classrooms, using technology to enhance the classroom experience, and UNI's role in training Iowa's future teachers. The College of Education's InTime project (Integrating New Technologies Into the Methods of Education), helping educators improve student learning at all levels and in all content areas will be discussed.

Panelists from the University of Northern Iowa include Robert Koob, president; Bill Callahan, associate dean, College of Education; Karla Krueger, InTime co-director; Yana Cornish, InTime technical coordinator and Judy Jeffrey, administrator, Iowa Department of Education.

InTime is an online professional development program that shows teachers how to integrate technology into the classroom. Created by the College of Education at the University of Northern Iowa in 1999, the free Web site was funded by a $2.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

The site features a database of more than 540 videos and accompanying curriculum materials. InTime allows educators to watch online video vignettes of top PreK-12 teachers from various grades and subject areas. The videos show teachers integrating technology into their classrooms.

'A language arts teacher can learn how another instructor uses computer software to help children who have difficulty in writing or spelling,' explained Krueger.

As a spin-off of the InTime project, UNI has introduced its first DVD, 'Using Teaching Standards to Improve Student Learning' which helps educators meet the state-mandated Iowa Teaching Standards for teacher evaluation. The DVD has more than three hours of video examples that specifically illustrate the eight Iowa Teaching Standards and 42 subpoints that are used for evaluating new teachers. The DVD, together with print materials is available for $100.

A second DVD, 'Democracy in the Classroom: Developing Character and Citizenship,' addresses the need to improve education about democracy and citizenship. The DVD will be available next year.

The InTime Web site has received more than 20 million hits and has more than 33,000 ongoing users. RSVPs are required for the Dec. 3 event. To RSVP, call Stacey Christensen at (319) 273-3170.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) announced today that the University of Northern Iowa will be recertified with conditions. This classification means UNI is considered to be operating its athletics program in substantial conformity with operating principles adopted by the association's Division I membership, but there are areas of concern that must be addressed before full certification is granted.

According to Rick Hartzell, UNI director of athletics, 'We respect this important process of NCAA certification. And, it is a process. We met every condition except two concerns expressed about our equity and minority plans and we will address those shortcomings head-on in the next year, as directed by the certification committee.

'With the dramatic decrease in state funding to the regents institutions, there are many important things that just cannot get done on campus,' continued Hartzell. 'In this case, our student equity, and student and faculty minority enhancement action plans were well on the way to being fulfilled, but they have been stalled by a lack of funding. That is unfortunate, to say the least.'

Hartzell said the university's athletics programs tell a success story. 'Not only are our teams winning across the board, but student-athletes are performing in the classroom at a rate that is better than that of the regular student body in terms of grade point average and graduation rate.'

UNI's 400 student athletes have an average GPA of 2.90, and several of the teams have averages greater than 3.20. The student-athlete graduation rate is at nearly 70 percent, one of the best in the Missouri Valley Conference. 'Academic performance of student-athletes continues to be our top priority,' said Hartzell.

The university must submit written evidence regarding resolution of the issues in question by Sept. 1, 2004.

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November 18, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Members of the University of Northern Iowa Individual Events Speech team traveled to Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., Nov. 7-9 for one of the year's largest and most competitive tournaments.

Danielle Dick, a senior culture and communication major from Dayton, won fourth place in program oral interpretation, with a collection of poetry, prose, and essays on Native American women.

Mike Hilkin, a sophomore English education major from Dubuque, won fourth place in novice extemporaneous speaking with a topic on presidential candidate Howard Dean's chances of winning the 2004 presidential election.

Cate Palczewski, UNI professor of communication studies and acting director of forensics, said several of the students were 'next out' in their events, meaning they were in the top 10 overall. They were: Hilkin in novice impromptu, Dick in communication analysis, and Sara Gronstal, a senior elementary education major from Council Bluffs, in after dinner speaking and dramatic interpretation.

November 17, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Northern Iowa Symphony Orchestra from the University of Northern Iowa recently traveled to Cedar Rapids and Iowa City to perform for public school students.



The members spent Monday, Nov. 3 visiting City High and West High School in Iowa City, and Jefferson and Kennedy High Schools (at Jefferson) in Cedar Rapids.

Members of the Symphony Orchestra performing on the trip include: _(NAME)_ of _(HOMETOWN)_, who plays _(INSTRUMENT)_. The orchestra is under the direction of Rebecca Burkhardt, UNI professor of music, who accompanied the members. For further information contact Burkhardt, (319) 273-6272.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Amy Nordheim, a freshman early childhood development major from Waukon, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Nordheim is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Waukon High School's publication.

Nordheim is actively involved with UNI and the surrounding community through the Alpha Delta Pi sorority.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Six University of Northern Iowa industrial technology students recently finished in first place in the Associated Schools of Construction's (ASC) 2003 commercial division student estimating competition. Eleven schools participated in the commercial division, including Iowa State, Kansas State, and North Dakota State.

The student competitors, all members of the Department of Industrial Technology's Management Club, were: Dave Denley from Lake Zurich, Ill., Nick Knepper from Waterloo, Shaun Kukuzke from Keswick, Phillip Strom from Clinton, Rod Schumacher from Dubuque and Jon Wall from Altoona. In addition to the team's first place finish, Denley won the outstanding presenter award.

Mike Zwanziger, UNI adjunct instructor and the team's coach, said he considers the students' accomplishment all the more impressive as equipment difficulties left the team without the use of visual aids.

The competition is sponsored by the ASC and Associated General Contractors (AGC).

Six team members will represent Region IV in the National Student Estimating Competition to be held in conjunction with the national AGC annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. this spring.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Jon Fasselius, a junior electronic media major from Dubuque, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, his can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Fasselius is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Dubuque Senior High School's publication.

Fasselius is involved with UNI's student radio station and books campus entertainment as a co-chair with Panther Productions.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Jay Hefel, a junior economics major from Dubuque, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, his can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Hefel is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Hempstead High School's publication The Equestrian.

Hefel's involvement includes the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), and badminton, flag football and softball intramurals.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- James HiDuke, University of Northern Iowa assistant professor of English language and literature, died Monday, Nov. 17, of natural causes at his home in Cedar Falls. HiDuke was nationally known as 'Dr. Grammar.' A veteran English professor who taught English and writing courses, HiDuke was well known by students and faculty as a source of answers to tough questions -- hence the nickname, 'Dr. Grammar.'

HiDuke was the mind behind UNI's free Dr. Grammar advice service, which was launched for UNI students, faculty, staff and the community in 1999.

HiDuke came to UNI in 1967 as an English instructor. He held a bachelor's degree from St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer, Ind.; and a master's degree from Marquette University, Milwaukee, where he specialized in composition/modern drama.

He is survived by his wife, Carlene. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 22, at First United Methodist Church, Cedar Falls. Memorials can be sent to the American Cancer Society.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Wellness and Recreation Services (WRS) recently presented Jill Semsch, a junior marketing major from Stockton, with its October student employee of the month award.

Semsch recently began her job as marketing and public relations assistant for WRS. According to her direct supervisor, Kathy Gulick, director of UNI WRS, she was selected for the award for her quality of work, ability to multi-task, excellent communication with staff, knowledge, time management skills, work ethic and personal qualities. Semsch is receiving credit for her WRS employment with internship status through the UNI Cooperative Education Office.



For further information contact, Gulick, at (319) 273-6921.

November 16, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Tara Tyler, a senior middle school/elementary education major from Ankeny, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Tyler is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Ankeny High School's publication.

Tyler is especially active in UNI's residence hall system, serving on student senate and as Lawther Hall president.

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Winterizing your child's playground

The temperatures are getting colder and snow may soon blanket the ground. But that won't keep kids away from their playgrounds. As winter approaches, schools and parks management staff need to make sure playgrounds are maintained and made safe form the harshest weather conditions. Heather Olsen, project coordinator for the National Program for Playground Safety housed at the University of Northern Iowa, says there are a number of things parents should look for at their children's playgrounds.

'Parents should check to see if the equipment is in good condition for winter, checking for signs of deterioration,' she says. 'For example, is the wood splintered, the metal rusted or the plastic cracked?' Other areas for checking include surface depth. The center recommends 12 inches of fluffed and loose pea gravel or sand and she says it's a good idea to make sure it hasn't hardened from the frost and snow.

Contacts:

Heather Olsen, project coordinator, National Program for Playground Safety at UNI, (319) 273-6173 (office); (319) 273-2416 (department office; Heather.Olsen@uni.edu (e-mail)

Vicki Grimes, Office of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





The Great American Smokeout

The Great American Smokeout, America's annual attempt to deter smokers, is Thursday, Nov. 20. Kathy Gulick, director of University Health Services at UNI, believes the Smokeout is just one of many strategies that can encourage smokers to quit. 'Most smokers wish they did not smoke and want to quit, but nicotine is an addictive drug,' she says. 'It takes hold of one's life physically, socially and emotionally. Any support that can be provided by others to smokers who want to quit can be helpful.'

Gulick says smokers should begin by selecting a quit date. 'There is a higher success rate for individuals who also do one or more of the following: find support of friends, family or a support group; use nicotine replacement therapy; make a plan for alternatives to smoking; identify strategies to deal with each trigger to wanting a cigarette; begin some healthy and fun activities; reward themselves in other ways for being smoke-free.'

Contact:

Kathy Gulick, director of University Health Services, (319) 273-6931, 277-1897. kathy.gulick@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





The importance of conversation skills

Nov. 24 kicks off Better Conversation Week. With the holiday season approaching, some helpful hints can liven up your family dinners.

'The most important variable in conversation is the nature of the relationship,' explains Mary Bozik, professor of communication studies at the University of Northern Iowa. 'Obviously, you talk to your grandparents differently than your fraternity brothers.'

One key component of great conversation is the ability to understand your listener. 'You need to focus on them, not yourself, and speak to their interests and experience,' Bozik says. 'The language you use can make a big difference as well. In each relationship, there are trigger words that will anger or turn off the listener. Occasionally we use these words on purpose, but it is best to avoid them.'

As a listener, your role is equal or even more important to the conversation. 'Listeners should be open and provide feedback through questions, answers, additional information or with that all-powerful tool, silence.'

Contact:

Mary Bozik, professor of communication studies, (319) 273-2048 (office), (319) 273-2217 (department office), Mary.Bozik@uni.edu (e-mail). NOTE: Bozik will be unavailable Nov. 19-23, due to off-campus assignments. She will return to campus Nov. 24.

Melissa Barber, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





November is National Caregivers Month



November is National Caregivers Month, a time to recognize those committed to serving the nation's aging population.

'As the ratio of older adults increases, the need for non-medical caregivers and elder-friendly goods and services increases,' says Julia Wallace, CSBS dean. 'According to the U.S. Census, Iowa is tied for fourth place in the nation for the proportion of its citizens who are 65 or older. It ranks first for its proportion of citizens 85 and older.'

According to the latest U.S. Census, the number of Iowans age 85 or older increased by 19 percent between 1990 and 2000. In fact, there are now more than 30 million older Americans. As that number rises, so will the need for programming, policies and health care to serve that population.

The University of Northern Iowa's College of Social & Behavioral Sciences (CSBS) recently received a grant from the U.S. Department of Education to establish the Iowa Center for Applied Gerontology. The center is the state's only undergraduate program specializing in the study of older adults. UNI's gerontology program was established in 1979 as a 15-credit-hour certificate program. In 2002, it became the first bachelor of arts program in gerontology in the state.

Contacts:

Julia Wallace, dean, College of Social & Behavioral Sciences, (319) 273-2221 (office), e-mail at julia.wallace@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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UNI to celebrate American Education Week

The University of Northern Iowa will celebrate American Education Week through Nov. 21 with a series of related events throughout the community. This year's theme is 'Making Public Schools Great For Every Child.'

'It's an excellent opportunity for UNI to highlight its strong tradition of teacher education, and to share that tradition with young students across the Cedar Valley,' said Stacey Christensen, community outreach manager at UNI. UNI faculty, staff and students will emphasize education through presentations at area schools. They are listed below.

Tuesday, Nov. 18

-9:30 a.m., Sacred Heart School, Waterloo, UNI Culture and Intensive English Program students working with students in grades six through eight.

-10:30 a.m., Immanuel Lutheran School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre,

-12:30 a.m., Immanuel Lutheran School, physical fitness activity with kindergarten students

-1 p.m., West High School, Waterloo, UNI Jazz Band II performing

-2 p.m., Immanuel Lutheran School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre working with students in grades four and five

Wednesday, Nov. 19

-9 a.m., Blessed Sacrament School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre working with students in kindergarten through fourth grade

-9 a.m., Irving Elementary, Waterloo, 'Bullying and Teasing' presentation by Cheryl Timion, Student Field Experience instructor

-9:30 a.m., Sacred Heart School, Waterloo, 'Memory and Eyewitness' presentation by Kim MacLin, associate professor of psychology

-10 a.m., Irving Elementary School, Waterloo, 'Bullying and Teasing' presentation by Cheryl Timion, Student Field Experience instructor

-10:15 a.m., Irving Elementary School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre working with second-grade students

-11 a.m., Immanuel Lutheran School, Waterloo, 'Memory and Eyewitness' presentation by Kim MacLin, associate professor of psychology

Thursday, Nov. 20

-9 a.m., Sacred Heart School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre, working with students in pre-kindergarten through second grade

-9 a.m., Hansen Elementary School, CIEP students working with sixth-grade students

-9 a.m., Logan Middle School, Waterloo, 'Memory and Eyewitness' presentation by Kim MacLin, associate professor of psychology

-1:30 p.m., Irving Elementary School, Waterloo, physical education activity for second-grade students

-2 p.m., Cedar Heights Elementary School, 'Memory and Eyewitness' presentation by Kim MacLin, associate professor of psychology

Friday, Nov. 21

-9 a.m., Irving Elementary School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre working with second-grade students

-2 p.m., Black Hawk Elementary School, Waterloo, SAI book reading for students in grades two and three.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa --The University of Northern Iowa's Rod Library has named its November 'Student Assistant of the Month.' Angie Hoth, a first year graduate student in speech therapy, from Charles City, Iowa and Lake City, Minn., is a student assistant in the Rod Library Cataloging Department.

The library staff nominated Angie for her outstanding work in the Cataloging Department. According to her nominators, Angie is extremely reliable, always pleasant and able to grasp detailed, complex instructions quickly.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Erin Westensee, a junior management information systems major from Rock Island, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Westensee is featured in newspaper ads that will appear in the November issue of Rock Island High School's publication Crimson Crier and the December issue of Alleman High School's publication Pioneer Press.

Westensee is a member of the UNI golf team. She is also active with organizations including the Management Information System Association, Students Today Alumni Tomorrow, and Sigma Iota, a service club.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Nate Nieman, a sophomore English major from Bettendorf, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Nieman is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Bettendorf High School's publication The Growl.

Nieman is active with the University Honors Program, a research assistant for the Department of Philosophy and Religion, and a writer for the campus newspaper Legacy.

November 13, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa - - The University of Northern Iowa town hall meeting scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 17, at Sioux City's Western Iowa Tech Community College, Building A, Wells Fargo Room has been cancelled.

For more information contact Stacey Christensen (319) 273-3170.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The National Student Exchange (NSE) program at the University of Northern Iowa has sent several UNI students to colleges and universities throughout the U.S. for the fall semester.



Among the students participating for the fall 2003 semester is(Name), a (Classification) from (Hometown), attending (School).

Through the program, students have the opportunity to attend one of 166 colleges and universities across the United States for one or two semesters while paying UNI tuition. Students must have both a UNI and cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 and be a sophomore or junior while on exchange. Nearly 700 UNI scholars have participated in this program since 1977.

The NSE program provides students with a unique opportunity to enhance the academic, social and cultural experiences they are currently receiving at UNI, according to Karen Cunningham, NSE coordinator. She says the program believes participation can expand a student's social and cultural awareness in a very significant way, as some students have never had the opportunity to travel beyond the immediate area.

An informational meeting for students interested in learning more about the NSE program will be held at 5:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 17, in the Maucker Union State College Room. Additional informational meetings are scheduled on Dec. 10, Jan. 20, 2004, and Feb. 4. For more information, contact Cunningham at (319) 273-2504.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Theatre UNI will present the Tony Award-winning play, 'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,' by Tom Stoppard, Nov. 13-23 at the Strayer-Wood Theatre.

'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead' is a spoof of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet,' with the minor characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern taking the lead. It will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 13 through 15 and Nov. 20 through 22; and at 2 p.m. Nov. 23. The show is supported by the Martha Ellen Tye Guest Artist Fund.

Directed by Scott Nice, UNI associate professor of theatre, the Theatre UNI student cast includes Gretchen Carter from Sioux City as Rosencrantz and Sarah Noll from Dubuque as Guildenstern. Other cast members include Jeff Johnson from Lake View; Anthony Soike from Des Moines; Jessica Rafoth from Dubuque; MyQue Franz from Independence; Bryan Wave from Kaleva, Mich.; Chris McGahan from Salina, Kan.; Rebecca Wagoner from Maquoketa; Michael Frieden from Waterloo; Courtney Smith from Cedar Falls; Aaron De Young from Spencer; Derek Johnson from Manchester; and Ned Kelly from Marion.

The production team includes scenic designer Mark A. Parrott; guest lighting designer David G. DelColetti, associate professor of theatre at Indiana State University in Terra Haute; costume designer Katie Sue Nicklos from La Junta, Colo.; makeup designer Amy S. RohrBerg, associate professor of theatre; and sound designer Brad M. Carlson from Cedar Falls. The stage manager is Justin A. Hossle from Red Oak.

Tickets for 'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,' are $10 for the general public; $8 for senior citizens and $5 for youth. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Strayer-Wood Theatre box office at 319-273-6381, or online at www.uni.edu/theatre.

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Honored will be:

Capt. Joel Helgerson, originally from Elkader. Helgerson is a 2000 UNI graduate, with a bachelor's degree in elementary education. He is assigned to the 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment of the 1st Armored Division, in Ft. Riley, Kan. During the war in Iraq he served as a headquarters company executive officer. He received the bronze star.



1st Lt. Stephen Thorpe, originally from Waterloo. Thorpe is a 2000 UNI graduate, with a bachelor's degree in general studies. He is assigned to the 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment of the 1st Armored Division, Ft. Riley, Kan. During the war in Iraq he served as a platoon leader. He received the purple heart and was recommended for the silver star and bronze star.



1st Lt. Derik VanBaale, originally from Newton. VanBaale is a 2000 UNI graduate, with a bachelor's degree in general studies. He is assigned to the 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment of the 1st Armored Division, Ft. Riley, Kan. During the war in Iraq he served as a fire support officer for B Company, 1st Battalion of the 41st Infantry. He received the bronze star.



UNI Athletic Director, Rick Hartzell, will present each officer with a piece of UNI Athletics memorabilia. The public address announcer will read a biography about each officer. Five minutes will be added to halftime to accommodate the ceremony.

Additionally, Army Spc. Eric Bailey originally from Norwalk will be part of the UNI ROTC color guard. Bailey is a UNI senior general studies major home on leave from Tikrit, Iraq where he is serving with the Iowa Army National Guard's 234th Signal Battalion, based in Cedar Rapids. Bailey plans to return to UNI to finish his degree following his deployment. He will be presented a UNI flag to fly on his HUMMVE in Iraq. The flag will be signed by UNI head football coach Mark Farley.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Jen Burton, a senior secondary math education major from Davenport, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Burton is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Davenport North High School's publication The Pursuit.

Burton's involvement includes traveling to Europe for Camp Adventure and serving as a Student Alumni Ambassador.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Melanie Miller, a junior chemistry marketing major from Sioux City, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Miller is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Sioux City East High School's publication Tomahawk.

Miller has been active with Student Alumni Ambassadors, intramural sports and honor societies such as Golden Key Honor Society, Honor Student Advisory Board, and the University Honors Program.

November 12, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Bernadette Garza, a senior vocal performance major from West Des Moines, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Garza is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of West Des Moines Valley High School's publication Spotlight.

Garza is active in the School of Music, with upcoming performances in Best of Broadway, Tender Land, and the Men's Glee Club Christmas show. She is an intern at the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center.

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