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News Release Archive

November 23, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Five University of Northern Iowa students and two faculty members received top honors at the Oct. 21 ï¾– 26 meeting of the International Association of Education and Communications Technology (IAECT), in Anaheim, Calif.

Kim Carter, a graduate student pursuing a doctor of education, from New Orleans, was awarded the West McJulien Graduate Student award. ReGina Rankins, a graduate student majoring in performance and training technology, from New Orleans, was elected Secretary-Treasurer of the AECT Minorities and Media Committee.

Mary Herring, UNI assistant professor of educational technology, was elected as chairperson of AECT's Standards and Accreditation Committee. Ana Donaldson, UNI assistant professor of educational technology, received the Presidential Service Award.

Aretha Davids, a graduate student majoring in educational technology, from Waterloo, Chieko Homma, a graduate student majoring in educational technology, from Tokyo, and Adam Benge, a senior studying industrial technology and graphic communication, of Ankeny, were also recognized. The three received first place honors for their video, '1000 Candles 1000 Cranes,' in the International Student Media Festival. The video tells the story of an American woman and a Japanese woman who lost their families during World War II.

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November 19, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Men's Soccer Club has ended its outdoor soccer season, with a record of 8-7-0. The team will begin practice next month for its indoor season.

The team recently attended a regional tournament in Woodbury, Minn., hosted by the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. The team lost 1-0 to Moorehead State, beat the University of Wisconsin-Stout 2-0, and beat Mankato State 3-1. The team placed fifth overall out of the 12 competing teams.

According to the team's student president, Josh Printz of Pella, the team will compete in additional indoor tournaments throughout the winter and spring. Last year, the club was ranked in the top 15 in the nation for club sports.

To obtain a list of the soccer players, please contact the office of University Marketing & Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa will present 'Using Technology to Improve Teacher Quality for Iowa,' a free panel discussion for educators and school administrators at 6:30 p.m., Dec. 3, at the West Des Moines Marriott.

The discussion will cover the importance of technology in 21st century classrooms, using technology to enhance the classroom experience, and UNI's role in training Iowa's future teachers. The College of Education's InTime project (Integrating New Technologies Into the Methods of Education), helping educators improve student learning at all levels and in all content areas will be discussed.

Panelists from the University of Northern Iowa include Robert Koob, president; Bill Callahan, associate dean, College of Education; Karla Krueger, InTime co-director; Yana Cornish, InTime technical coordinator and Judy Jeffrey, administrator, Iowa Department of Education.

InTime is an online professional development program that shows teachers how to integrate technology into the classroom. Created by the College of Education at the University of Northern Iowa in 1999, the free Web site was funded by a $2.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

The site features a database of more than 540 videos and accompanying curriculum materials. InTime allows educators to watch online video vignettes of top PreK-12 teachers from various grades and subject areas. The videos show teachers integrating technology into their classrooms.

'A language arts teacher can learn how another instructor uses computer software to help children who have difficulty in writing or spelling,' explained Krueger.

As a spin-off of the InTime project, UNI has introduced its first DVD, 'Using Teaching Standards to Improve Student Learning' which helps educators meet the state-mandated Iowa Teaching Standards for teacher evaluation. The DVD has more than three hours of video examples that specifically illustrate the eight Iowa Teaching Standards and 42 subpoints that are used for evaluating new teachers. The DVD, together with print materials is available for $100.

A second DVD, 'Democracy in the Classroom: Developing Character and Citizenship,' addresses the need to improve education about democracy and citizenship. The DVD will be available next year.

The InTime Web site has received more than 20 million hits and has more than 33,000 ongoing users. RSVPs are required for the Dec. 3 event. To RSVP, call Stacey Christensen at (319) 273-3170.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) announced today that the University of Northern Iowa will be recertified with conditions. This classification means UNI is considered to be operating its athletics program in substantial conformity with operating principles adopted by the association's Division I membership, but there are areas of concern that must be addressed before full certification is granted.

According to Rick Hartzell, UNI director of athletics, 'We respect this important process of NCAA certification. And, it is a process. We met every condition except two concerns expressed about our equity and minority plans and we will address those shortcomings head-on in the next year, as directed by the certification committee.

'With the dramatic decrease in state funding to the regents institutions, there are many important things that just cannot get done on campus,' continued Hartzell. 'In this case, our student equity, and student and faculty minority enhancement action plans were well on the way to being fulfilled, but they have been stalled by a lack of funding. That is unfortunate, to say the least.'

Hartzell said the university's athletics programs tell a success story. 'Not only are our teams winning across the board, but student-athletes are performing in the classroom at a rate that is better than that of the regular student body in terms of grade point average and graduation rate.'

UNI's 400 student athletes have an average GPA of 2.90, and several of the teams have averages greater than 3.20. The student-athlete graduation rate is at nearly 70 percent, one of the best in the Missouri Valley Conference. 'Academic performance of student-athletes continues to be our top priority,' said Hartzell.

The university must submit written evidence regarding resolution of the issues in question by Sept. 1, 2004.

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November 18, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Members of the University of Northern Iowa Individual Events Speech team traveled to Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., Nov. 7-9 for one of the year's largest and most competitive tournaments.

Danielle Dick, a senior culture and communication major from Dayton, won fourth place in program oral interpretation, with a collection of poetry, prose, and essays on Native American women.

Mike Hilkin, a sophomore English education major from Dubuque, won fourth place in novice extemporaneous speaking with a topic on presidential candidate Howard Dean's chances of winning the 2004 presidential election.

Cate Palczewski, UNI professor of communication studies and acting director of forensics, said several of the students were 'next out' in their events, meaning they were in the top 10 overall. They were: Hilkin in novice impromptu, Dick in communication analysis, and Sara Gronstal, a senior elementary education major from Council Bluffs, in after dinner speaking and dramatic interpretation.

November 17, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Northern Iowa Symphony Orchestra from the University of Northern Iowa recently traveled to Cedar Rapids and Iowa City to perform for public school students.



The members spent Monday, Nov. 3 visiting City High and West High School in Iowa City, and Jefferson and Kennedy High Schools (at Jefferson) in Cedar Rapids.

Members of the Symphony Orchestra performing on the trip include: _(NAME)_ of _(HOMETOWN)_, who plays _(INSTRUMENT)_. The orchestra is under the direction of Rebecca Burkhardt, UNI professor of music, who accompanied the members. For further information contact Burkhardt, (319) 273-6272.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Amy Nordheim, a freshman early childhood development major from Waukon, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Nordheim is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Waukon High School's publication.

Nordheim is actively involved with UNI and the surrounding community through the Alpha Delta Pi sorority.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Six University of Northern Iowa industrial technology students recently finished in first place in the Associated Schools of Construction's (ASC) 2003 commercial division student estimating competition. Eleven schools participated in the commercial division, including Iowa State, Kansas State, and North Dakota State.

The student competitors, all members of the Department of Industrial Technology's Management Club, were: Dave Denley from Lake Zurich, Ill., Nick Knepper from Waterloo, Shaun Kukuzke from Keswick, Phillip Strom from Clinton, Rod Schumacher from Dubuque and Jon Wall from Altoona. In addition to the team's first place finish, Denley won the outstanding presenter award.

Mike Zwanziger, UNI adjunct instructor and the team's coach, said he considers the students' accomplishment all the more impressive as equipment difficulties left the team without the use of visual aids.

The competition is sponsored by the ASC and Associated General Contractors (AGC).

Six team members will represent Region IV in the National Student Estimating Competition to be held in conjunction with the national AGC annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. this spring.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Jon Fasselius, a junior electronic media major from Dubuque, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, his can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Fasselius is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Dubuque Senior High School's publication.

Fasselius is involved with UNI's student radio station and books campus entertainment as a co-chair with Panther Productions.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Jay Hefel, a junior economics major from Dubuque, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, his can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Hefel is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Hempstead High School's publication The Equestrian.

Hefel's involvement includes the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), and badminton, flag football and softball intramurals.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- James HiDuke, University of Northern Iowa assistant professor of English language and literature, died Monday, Nov. 17, of natural causes at his home in Cedar Falls. HiDuke was nationally known as 'Dr. Grammar.' A veteran English professor who taught English and writing courses, HiDuke was well known by students and faculty as a source of answers to tough questions -- hence the nickname, 'Dr. Grammar.'

HiDuke was the mind behind UNI's free Dr. Grammar advice service, which was launched for UNI students, faculty, staff and the community in 1999.

HiDuke came to UNI in 1967 as an English instructor. He held a bachelor's degree from St. Joseph's College, Rensselaer, Ind.; and a master's degree from Marquette University, Milwaukee, where he specialized in composition/modern drama.

He is survived by his wife, Carlene. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 22, at First United Methodist Church, Cedar Falls. Memorials can be sent to the American Cancer Society.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Wellness and Recreation Services (WRS) recently presented Jill Semsch, a junior marketing major from Stockton, with its October student employee of the month award.

Semsch recently began her job as marketing and public relations assistant for WRS. According to her direct supervisor, Kathy Gulick, director of UNI WRS, she was selected for the award for her quality of work, ability to multi-task, excellent communication with staff, knowledge, time management skills, work ethic and personal qualities. Semsch is receiving credit for her WRS employment with internship status through the UNI Cooperative Education Office.



For further information contact, Gulick, at (319) 273-6921.

November 16, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Tara Tyler, a senior middle school/elementary education major from Ankeny, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Tyler is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Ankeny High School's publication.

Tyler is especially active in UNI's residence hall system, serving on student senate and as Lawther Hall president.

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Winterizing your child's playground

The temperatures are getting colder and snow may soon blanket the ground. But that won't keep kids away from their playgrounds. As winter approaches, schools and parks management staff need to make sure playgrounds are maintained and made safe form the harshest weather conditions. Heather Olsen, project coordinator for the National Program for Playground Safety housed at the University of Northern Iowa, says there are a number of things parents should look for at their children's playgrounds.

'Parents should check to see if the equipment is in good condition for winter, checking for signs of deterioration,' she says. 'For example, is the wood splintered, the metal rusted or the plastic cracked?' Other areas for checking include surface depth. The center recommends 12 inches of fluffed and loose pea gravel or sand and she says it's a good idea to make sure it hasn't hardened from the frost and snow.

Contacts:

Heather Olsen, project coordinator, National Program for Playground Safety at UNI, (319) 273-6173 (office); (319) 273-2416 (department office; Heather.Olsen@uni.edu (e-mail)

Vicki Grimes, Office of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





The Great American Smokeout

The Great American Smokeout, America's annual attempt to deter smokers, is Thursday, Nov. 20. Kathy Gulick, director of University Health Services at UNI, believes the Smokeout is just one of many strategies that can encourage smokers to quit. 'Most smokers wish they did not smoke and want to quit, but nicotine is an addictive drug,' she says. 'It takes hold of one's life physically, socially and emotionally. Any support that can be provided by others to smokers who want to quit can be helpful.'

Gulick says smokers should begin by selecting a quit date. 'There is a higher success rate for individuals who also do one or more of the following: find support of friends, family or a support group; use nicotine replacement therapy; make a plan for alternatives to smoking; identify strategies to deal with each trigger to wanting a cigarette; begin some healthy and fun activities; reward themselves in other ways for being smoke-free.'

Contact:

Kathy Gulick, director of University Health Services, (319) 273-6931, 277-1897. kathy.gulick@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





The importance of conversation skills

Nov. 24 kicks off Better Conversation Week. With the holiday season approaching, some helpful hints can liven up your family dinners.

'The most important variable in conversation is the nature of the relationship,' explains Mary Bozik, professor of communication studies at the University of Northern Iowa. 'Obviously, you talk to your grandparents differently than your fraternity brothers.'

One key component of great conversation is the ability to understand your listener. 'You need to focus on them, not yourself, and speak to their interests and experience,' Bozik says. 'The language you use can make a big difference as well. In each relationship, there are trigger words that will anger or turn off the listener. Occasionally we use these words on purpose, but it is best to avoid them.'

As a listener, your role is equal or even more important to the conversation. 'Listeners should be open and provide feedback through questions, answers, additional information or with that all-powerful tool, silence.'

Contact:

Mary Bozik, professor of communication studies, (319) 273-2048 (office), (319) 273-2217 (department office), Mary.Bozik@uni.edu (e-mail). NOTE: Bozik will be unavailable Nov. 19-23, due to off-campus assignments. She will return to campus Nov. 24.

Melissa Barber, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





November is National Caregivers Month



November is National Caregivers Month, a time to recognize those committed to serving the nation's aging population.

'As the ratio of older adults increases, the need for non-medical caregivers and elder-friendly goods and services increases,' says Julia Wallace, CSBS dean. 'According to the U.S. Census, Iowa is tied for fourth place in the nation for the proportion of its citizens who are 65 or older. It ranks first for its proportion of citizens 85 and older.'

According to the latest U.S. Census, the number of Iowans age 85 or older increased by 19 percent between 1990 and 2000. In fact, there are now more than 30 million older Americans. As that number rises, so will the need for programming, policies and health care to serve that population.

The University of Northern Iowa's College of Social & Behavioral Sciences (CSBS) recently received a grant from the U.S. Department of Education to establish the Iowa Center for Applied Gerontology. The center is the state's only undergraduate program specializing in the study of older adults. UNI's gerontology program was established in 1979 as a 15-credit-hour certificate program. In 2002, it became the first bachelor of arts program in gerontology in the state.

Contacts:

Julia Wallace, dean, College of Social & Behavioral Sciences, (319) 273-2221 (office), e-mail at julia.wallace@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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UNI to celebrate American Education Week

The University of Northern Iowa will celebrate American Education Week through Nov. 21 with a series of related events throughout the community. This year's theme is 'Making Public Schools Great For Every Child.'

'It's an excellent opportunity for UNI to highlight its strong tradition of teacher education, and to share that tradition with young students across the Cedar Valley,' said Stacey Christensen, community outreach manager at UNI. UNI faculty, staff and students will emphasize education through presentations at area schools. They are listed below.

Tuesday, Nov. 18

-9:30 a.m., Sacred Heart School, Waterloo, UNI Culture and Intensive English Program students working with students in grades six through eight.

-10:30 a.m., Immanuel Lutheran School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre,

-12:30 a.m., Immanuel Lutheran School, physical fitness activity with kindergarten students

-1 p.m., West High School, Waterloo, UNI Jazz Band II performing

-2 p.m., Immanuel Lutheran School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre working with students in grades four and five

Wednesday, Nov. 19

-9 a.m., Blessed Sacrament School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre working with students in kindergarten through fourth grade

-9 a.m., Irving Elementary, Waterloo, 'Bullying and Teasing' presentation by Cheryl Timion, Student Field Experience instructor

-9:30 a.m., Sacred Heart School, Waterloo, 'Memory and Eyewitness' presentation by Kim MacLin, associate professor of psychology

-10 a.m., Irving Elementary School, Waterloo, 'Bullying and Teasing' presentation by Cheryl Timion, Student Field Experience instructor

-10:15 a.m., Irving Elementary School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre working with second-grade students

-11 a.m., Immanuel Lutheran School, Waterloo, 'Memory and Eyewitness' presentation by Kim MacLin, associate professor of psychology

Thursday, Nov. 20

-9 a.m., Sacred Heart School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre, working with students in pre-kindergarten through second grade

-9 a.m., Hansen Elementary School, CIEP students working with sixth-grade students

-9 a.m., Logan Middle School, Waterloo, 'Memory and Eyewitness' presentation by Kim MacLin, associate professor of psychology

-1:30 p.m., Irving Elementary School, Waterloo, physical education activity for second-grade students

-2 p.m., Cedar Heights Elementary School, 'Memory and Eyewitness' presentation by Kim MacLin, associate professor of psychology

Friday, Nov. 21

-9 a.m., Irving Elementary School, Waterloo, Young People's Dance Theatre working with second-grade students

-2 p.m., Black Hawk Elementary School, Waterloo, SAI book reading for students in grades two and three.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa --The University of Northern Iowa's Rod Library has named its November 'Student Assistant of the Month.' Angie Hoth, a first year graduate student in speech therapy, from Charles City, Iowa and Lake City, Minn., is a student assistant in the Rod Library Cataloging Department.

The library staff nominated Angie for her outstanding work in the Cataloging Department. According to her nominators, Angie is extremely reliable, always pleasant and able to grasp detailed, complex instructions quickly.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Erin Westensee, a junior management information systems major from Rock Island, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Westensee is featured in newspaper ads that will appear in the November issue of Rock Island High School's publication Crimson Crier and the December issue of Alleman High School's publication Pioneer Press.

Westensee is a member of the UNI golf team. She is also active with organizations including the Management Information System Association, Students Today Alumni Tomorrow, and Sigma Iota, a service club.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Nate Nieman, a sophomore English major from Bettendorf, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Nieman is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Bettendorf High School's publication The Growl.

Nieman is active with the University Honors Program, a research assistant for the Department of Philosophy and Religion, and a writer for the campus newspaper Legacy.

November 13, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa - - The University of Northern Iowa town hall meeting scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 17, at Sioux City's Western Iowa Tech Community College, Building A, Wells Fargo Room has been cancelled.

For more information contact Stacey Christensen (319) 273-3170.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The National Student Exchange (NSE) program at the University of Northern Iowa has sent several UNI students to colleges and universities throughout the U.S. for the fall semester.



Among the students participating for the fall 2003 semester is(Name), a (Classification) from (Hometown), attending (School).

Through the program, students have the opportunity to attend one of 166 colleges and universities across the United States for one or two semesters while paying UNI tuition. Students must have both a UNI and cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 and be a sophomore or junior while on exchange. Nearly 700 UNI scholars have participated in this program since 1977.

The NSE program provides students with a unique opportunity to enhance the academic, social and cultural experiences they are currently receiving at UNI, according to Karen Cunningham, NSE coordinator. She says the program believes participation can expand a student's social and cultural awareness in a very significant way, as some students have never had the opportunity to travel beyond the immediate area.

An informational meeting for students interested in learning more about the NSE program will be held at 5:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 17, in the Maucker Union State College Room. Additional informational meetings are scheduled on Dec. 10, Jan. 20, 2004, and Feb. 4. For more information, contact Cunningham at (319) 273-2504.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Theatre UNI will present the Tony Award-winning play, 'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,' by Tom Stoppard, Nov. 13-23 at the Strayer-Wood Theatre.

'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead' is a spoof of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet,' with the minor characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern taking the lead. It will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 13 through 15 and Nov. 20 through 22; and at 2 p.m. Nov. 23. The show is supported by the Martha Ellen Tye Guest Artist Fund.

Directed by Scott Nice, UNI associate professor of theatre, the Theatre UNI student cast includes Gretchen Carter from Sioux City as Rosencrantz and Sarah Noll from Dubuque as Guildenstern. Other cast members include Jeff Johnson from Lake View; Anthony Soike from Des Moines; Jessica Rafoth from Dubuque; MyQue Franz from Independence; Bryan Wave from Kaleva, Mich.; Chris McGahan from Salina, Kan.; Rebecca Wagoner from Maquoketa; Michael Frieden from Waterloo; Courtney Smith from Cedar Falls; Aaron De Young from Spencer; Derek Johnson from Manchester; and Ned Kelly from Marion.

The production team includes scenic designer Mark A. Parrott; guest lighting designer David G. DelColetti, associate professor of theatre at Indiana State University in Terra Haute; costume designer Katie Sue Nicklos from La Junta, Colo.; makeup designer Amy S. RohrBerg, associate professor of theatre; and sound designer Brad M. Carlson from Cedar Falls. The stage manager is Justin A. Hossle from Red Oak.

Tickets for 'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,' are $10 for the general public; $8 for senior citizens and $5 for youth. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Strayer-Wood Theatre box office at 319-273-6381, or online at www.uni.edu/theatre.

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Honored will be:

Capt. Joel Helgerson, originally from Elkader. Helgerson is a 2000 UNI graduate, with a bachelor's degree in elementary education. He is assigned to the 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment of the 1st Armored Division, in Ft. Riley, Kan. During the war in Iraq he served as a headquarters company executive officer. He received the bronze star.



1st Lt. Stephen Thorpe, originally from Waterloo. Thorpe is a 2000 UNI graduate, with a bachelor's degree in general studies. He is assigned to the 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment of the 1st Armored Division, Ft. Riley, Kan. During the war in Iraq he served as a platoon leader. He received the purple heart and was recommended for the silver star and bronze star.



1st Lt. Derik VanBaale, originally from Newton. VanBaale is a 2000 UNI graduate, with a bachelor's degree in general studies. He is assigned to the 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment of the 1st Armored Division, Ft. Riley, Kan. During the war in Iraq he served as a fire support officer for B Company, 1st Battalion of the 41st Infantry. He received the bronze star.



UNI Athletic Director, Rick Hartzell, will present each officer with a piece of UNI Athletics memorabilia. The public address announcer will read a biography about each officer. Five minutes will be added to halftime to accommodate the ceremony.

Additionally, Army Spc. Eric Bailey originally from Norwalk will be part of the UNI ROTC color guard. Bailey is a UNI senior general studies major home on leave from Tikrit, Iraq where he is serving with the Iowa Army National Guard's 234th Signal Battalion, based in Cedar Rapids. Bailey plans to return to UNI to finish his degree following his deployment. He will be presented a UNI flag to fly on his HUMMVE in Iraq. The flag will be signed by UNI head football coach Mark Farley.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Jen Burton, a senior secondary math education major from Davenport, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Burton is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Davenport North High School's publication The Pursuit.

Burton's involvement includes traveling to Europe for Camp Adventure and serving as a Student Alumni Ambassador.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Melanie Miller, a junior chemistry marketing major from Sioux City, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Miller is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Sioux City East High School's publication Tomahawk.

Miller has been active with Student Alumni Ambassadors, intramural sports and honor societies such as Golden Key Honor Society, Honor Student Advisory Board, and the University Honors Program.

November 12, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Bernadette Garza, a senior vocal performance major from West Des Moines, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Part of a rotating group of student, faculty, staff and alumni profiles, hers can be found on the Web at www.uni.edu. In addition to the Web, Garza is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of West Des Moines Valley High School's publication Spotlight.

Garza is active in the School of Music, with upcoming performances in Best of Broadway, Tender Land, and the Men's Glee Club Christmas show. She is an intern at the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is featuring Franny Horton, a junior elementary and middle school education major from Sioux City, as part of the new UNI marketing campaign. Horton is featured in a newspaper ad that will appear in the November issue of Sioux City West High School's publication.

Horton has been active with Phi Eta Sigma, the UNI dance team, National Society of Collegiate Scholars, and the education honor society Kappa Delta Pi.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa chapter of Sigma Xi, a national scientific and engineering honor society, will host an address, 'Science, Computer Science and Ethics: Searching for the Truth in a Make-Believe World,' at 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 20, in McCollum Science Hall, Room 201.

The speaker will be Keith Miller, professor of computer science at the University of Illinois-Springfield. He will discuss how using computers and technology in the quest for knowledge has raised questions about what we know and how we know it.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit the society's Web page, www.cns.uni.edu/SX/.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa will host an address, 'From Data to Understanding: Navigating Informational Spaces in the Age of Overwhelm,' at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 17, in Schindler Education Center, Room 252.

The speaker will be David D. Thornburg, founder and director of Global Operations for the Thornburg Center in Lake Barrington, Ill. He also serves as senior fellow of the Congressional Institute for the Future, and is a featured commentator for the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). He has written numerous books and created several CD-ROMs. His latest book, 'Campfires in Cyberspace,' explores the nature of the World Wide Web as a tool for learning.

He was recognized as one of the top 21 speakers nationwide by 'Successful Meetings' magazine, and named by 'Technology and Learning' magazine as one of the top ten most influential people in the field of educational technology in the past twenty years. Thornburg presents to more than 100,000 people every year.

His presentation will explore the numerous challenges educators confront as they help learners acquire the information retrieval and management skills necessary to succeed in today's world.

The event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Educational Technology division of Curriculum and Instruction in the UNI College of Education, and the UNI graduate program for Public Policy.

November 11, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa - - The University of Northern Iowa's Wellness and Recreation Services (WRS) has chosen Laurel Fister, a Riceville junior in health promotion, as the spring semester 2004 scholarship recipient.

Fister was selected to receive the $400 scholarship based on her performance as a WRS student employee, her understanding of how she contributes to the wellness of others through her role as a student employee, her verbal and written communication skills and recommendations from WRS professional staff. She is a personal trainer, peer educator and Wellness Resource Lab desk assistant.



The WRS scholarship is funded by Kathy Gulick, director of university health services, on behalf of four generations of women in her family who graduated from UNI.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, today gave the University of Northern Iowa approval to move ahead with construction of the McLeod Center, a 100,000-square-foot sports and entertainment facility to be located south of the UNI-Dome on the UNI campus. The UNI Foundation has raised approximately $17 million of the $18 million in private support needed to build the center. The anticipated total project cost is approximately $20 million. The remaining funds will come from the university and a $500,000 loan from the city of Cedar Falls.

Bill Calhoun, UNI vice president for university advancement, said construction should begin sometime in the summer.

The McLeod Center will be the home of Panther basketball and volleyball, and a competition site for wrestling. In addition, it will host numerous community events including concerts, trade and craft shows and youth activities ranging from state and national tournaments to camps. It will have seating for about 6,100 and a total capacity of 7,000. UNI's Institute for Decision Making, and C.H. Johnson Consulting Inc., an independent consulting firm, estimate the combination of the McLeod Center and the UNI-Dome will bring 370,000 more visitors to the Cedar Valley each year, with an economic impact of more than $15 million after three to five years of operation.

Herbert Lewis Kruse Blunck, a Des Moines architectural firm, has been hired to design the facility. In 2001, this nationally known firm received the American Institute of Architect's 2001 Architecture Firm Award, the institute's highest honor for design practice. Herbert Lewis Kruse Blunck also designed UNI's Rod Library fourth-floor addition, completed in 1995; and Residence on the Hill, completed in 1994. They will partner with Crawford Architects of Kansas City for this latest UNI project.

Construction of the McLeod Center is part of the $100 million 'Students First' campaign to support scholarships, academic program support and facilities. Other capital projects include McElroy Hall in Waterloo, which houses the Freeburg Early Childhood Program; renovation of Russell Hall; and equipment for McCollum Science Hall and Lang Hall.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Ag-Based Industrial Lubricants (ABIL) Research Program has been granted a patent for a soybean-based wood preservative concept.

'Simply put, the idea is to actively oxidize soy oil and then force it into wood products,' explained ABIL Director Lou Honary. 'The oil fills the wood pores and plasticizes in the wood, thus not allowing water to get in and cause rotting. When combined with preservatives, it could create a substitute for creosote and other controversial wood preservatives used in utility poles, railroad ties and on home decking and playground equipment.'

ABIL has a cooperative field project with an international forest products company to test the concept and determine the protection properties in various geographic climates and conditions across the country.

Honary holds nine patents for his soy-based industrial research.

ABIL is recognized nationally as a leader in the development and commercialization of soybean-based industrial lubricants. Established in 1991, the UNI-ABIL research program brings together research and testing to identify soybean oil characteristics and match them to appropriate industrial uses.

This year ABIL is licensing 24 industrial lubricants, greases and base oils made of soybean oil. For more information about ABlL, visit the Web site, www.uni.edu/abil.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa --The University of Northern Iowa's Rod Library has named its October 'Student Assistant of the Month.' Dave Keiser, a senior English major from Cedar Falls, is a student assistant in the Rod Library Access Services Department. He has been an employee since October 2000.



According to his nominators, Keiser's conscientious and reliable shelving make him one of Rod Library's most diligent student workers.



Keiser graduates in May and plans to stay in Cedar Falls.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Muslim Student Association (MSA) will sponsor a panel, 'Moses, Jesus and Mohammad: Three Prophets, One Origin, One Message,' at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 17, in Lang Hall Auditorium.

Panelists will be Kenneth Atkinson, assistant professor; Harry Brod, professor; and Betty DeBerg, head; all in the Department of Philosophy & Religion; Mohammad Fahmy, head of the Department of Industrial Technology; and Bu-Madyan Kahtan, a graduate student in the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. The event is free and open to the public.

Osman Jigre, a senior from Sioux City and president of the MSA, said the goal of the panel discussion is awareness. 'We don't want to preach or convert,' he explained. 'But there are a lot of people out there who don't understand the connections between the three religions. For instance, Muslims believe in Moses and Jesus and all the prophets. You can't consider yourself a Muslim if you don't believe in all the prophets.'

An information table, with materials about the MSA, will be set up in the lobby of the Central Ballroom of Maucker Union, from Monday, Nov. 17 through Wednesday, Nov. 19, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Views of Iraqi citizens about the United States will be the topic of the next 'Reel to Real' film, Wednesday, Nov. 19, in the University of Northern Iowa's Maucker Union.

'Iraq: Voices from the Streets,' will be shown from noon to 1 p.m., in the Maucker Union South Room. A discussion following the film will be facilitated by Guy Sims, Maucker Union associate director.

The video joins a U.S. congressional delegation that traveled to Iraq in 2002, to discuss the readmission of United Nations arms inspectors with the speaker of the Iraqi National Assembly and the Iraqi deputy prime minister in the hope of averting war. The video also features numerous 'man-on-the-street' interviews with Iraqi citizens, commentary from international politicians and peace activists, views of the impact of UN sanctions and U.S. bombing on the Iraqi economy and population, and the restrictions of the 'oil for food' program.

Sims said the film is part of the year-long 'Reel to Real' film series that presents short films worthy of reflection, discussion, challenge and criticism. The series is sponsored by the Maucker Union Student Activities office and will continue Feb. 18, with 'Stories of Change,' depicting the lives of four ethnically diverse women and their survival through difficult challenges in life.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information contact, Guy Sims at (319) 273-2683.

November 10, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A three-year, $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will establish a model Project Export Center of Excellence at the University of Northern Iowa, to provide leadership in addressing and reducing health-care disparities in underserved populations. The center also will address the preparation of students as health-disparities workers.

Michele Yehieli, director of UNI's Global Health Corps and executive director of the new center, explained that Iowa is experiencing some of the most significant demographic changes in the United States. As a result, she said, many meatpacking and agricultural processing companies, faced with one of the country's largest percentages of aging residents and the out-migration of younger workers, are recruiting thousands of refugees and immigrants from Latin America, eastern Europe, southeast Asia and Africa.

'This rapid ethnic diversification is occurring in a sparsely populated state where many counties are already designated as medically underserved areas, and where Native Americans and African Americans have faced considerable health challenges for decades,' Yehieli said.

She explained that the Project Export Center will bring together three organizations at UNI that have extensive ties with the state's minority populations -- the Global Health Corps, the Center for Social and Behavioral Research (CSBR), and the New Iowans Program.

The center's co-directors are Mark Grey, director of the New Iowans program; and Gene Lutz, director of the CSBR.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Creating a Place in Society for Children with Speech Impairment,' the first lecture in this year's Hearst Lecture Series at the University of Northern Iowa, will be presented at 7:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 17, in Room 108 of the Communication Arts Center at UNI.

Sharynne McLeod, senior lecturer and Key Researcher at Charles Sturt University in Bathurst, Australia, will deliver the address. It is open to the public, free of charge. It is sponsored by the UNI Department of Communicative Disorders, host for this year's series that is centered around the theme, 'Human Communication: Science and Disorders.'

McLeod says studies of adults who had speech impairment as children suggest negative educational, social and occupational outcomes. She will discuss the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) that provides a holistic framework to consider the health and wellness for all people.

She says when it is applied to children who have difficulty speaking, it allows for consideration of children's body structure; body function, such as the ability to produce sounds; activity, such as intelligibility; and participation in society. The holistic nature of this framework, she says, enables consideration of the place in society for children with speech impairment.

McLeod specializes in language acquisition and has contributed to the development of the speech pathology program at CSU by applications of the social wellness model of health. The model prepares students for professional service in rural and remote workplaces.

Her research interests include mapping tongue and palate contacts using electropalatography (EPG). She is editor of the Australian Journal, ACQuiring Knowledge in Speech, Language and Hearing, and serves on the executive board of Advances in Speech-Language Pathology. McLeod has also edited the proceedings of the International Phonetics and Linguistics Association.



The Hearst Lecture Series is supported by the Meryl Norton Hearst Chair in the UNI College of Humanities and Fine Arts. It was created by an endowment from James Schell Hearst, author, poet and professor of creative writing at UNI from 1941 until his retirement in 1975. The series engages scholars and experts from outside the university to share their expertise, as well as their viewpoints and theoretical frameworks.



The next speaker in the series, on Dec. 3, will be Steven Pinker, a finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Non-fiction for his newest book, 'The Blank Slate: The modern denial of human nature.'

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The National Student Exchange (NSE) program at the University of Northern Iowa will host an informational meeting at 5:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 17 in the Maucker Union State College Room.

Through the program, students have the opportunity to attend one of 166 colleges and universities across the United States for one or two semesters while paying UNI tuition. Students must have both a UNI and cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 and be a sophomore or junior while on exchange. Nearly 700 UNI scholars have participated in this program since 1977.

The NSE program provides students with a unique opportunity to enhance the academic, social and cultural experiences they are currently receiving at UNI, according to Karen Cunningham, NSE coordinator. She says the program believes participation can expand a student's social and cultural awareness in a very significant way, as some students have never had the opportunity to travel beyond the immediate area.

Additional informational meetings are scheduled on Dec. 10, Jan. 20, 2004, and Feb. 4. For more information, contact Cunningham at (319) 273-2504.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Heads vs. Feds: The Great Debate,' is the final satellite seminar of a five-part series hosted this fall by the University of Northern Iowa.

The National Collegiate Honors Council and Phi Theta Kappa honorary society will present the seminar from 6:30 to 8 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 18, via downlinks, in Schindler Education Center, Room 244/245. The seminar will feature Steven Hager, Robert Stutman and Billy R. Martin and their differing experiences with the war on drugs.

Hagar, editor-in-chief of the counterculture publication 'High Times Magazine,' founded the Freedom Fighters, a national marijuana legalization group. He holds a master's degree in journalism from the University of Illinois and has written three books, one focusing on the history of rap music, another on the East Village art movement and his most recent, 'Adventures in the Counterculture.'

Stutman, one of America's highest profile Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents, was responsible for more than 5,000 investigations, resulting in more than 15,000 arrests during his 25-year career. He is credited with bringing 'crack' to national attention. He directed international training efforts for foreign officers in investigations against drug trafficking. Stutman also served three years as the Director of Congressional Affairs, where he assisted in the drafting of legislation falling under DEA jurisdiction.

Martin is professor and chairman of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Virginia Commonwealth University. He is internationally known for his research in the pharmacology of cannabinoids and other abused drugs. Martin has served as the first president of the International Cannabis Research Society, advisor to the World Health Organization, member of the Institute of Medicine Advisory Panel and President of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence. He acts as the principal investigator for several ongoing studies of abused drugs.

Francis Degnin, UNI assistant professor of philosophy and religion, will moderate discussion at the end of the session. The series is co-sponsored by UNI's Department of Biology and Department of Philosophy and Religion, and the UNI Honors Program. It is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Jessica Moon, interim director of the UNI Honors Program, at (319) 273-3175 or jessica.moon@uni.edu.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Dreamer: A Portrait of Langston Hughes,' will be presented Tuesday, Nov. 18, at the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center (GBPAC) to celebrate the opening of the UNI Center for Multicultural Education.

Tenor Darryl Taylor, associate professor of voice, will present 'In Celebration of Langston Hughes.' His program will chronicle song settings by various composers inspired by Hughes, at 7:30 p.m., in the GBPAC Great Hall. Following the international success of his solo CD, 'Dreamer: A Portrait of Langston Hughes,' Taylor has presented this program across the country.

The UNI George Walker Society of Music will provide an opening performance for the recital. Maria Corley, graduate of the Juilliard School, will accompany Taylor on the piano and Gretchen Brumwell, instructor of music, will play the harp.

A panel discussion on Langston Hughes will take place preceding the program, from 3:30 to 5 p.m., in the multipurpose room of the new center. The panel discussion will feature Michael Blackwell, director for multicultural education, Vince Gotera, associate professor of English language and literature, and Pierre-Damien Mvuyekure, associate professor of English language and literature.

The performance is free and open to the public. For more information contact Michael Blackwell, at (319) 273-2250.

November 9, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa will host a downlink site for the second session of Iowa State University Extension's two-part national satellite series, 'Cultural Perspectives on Parenting,' from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 13, in Schindler Education Center, Room 244. This session will focus on how culture influences parenting and how family professionals can support culturally diverse families.

According to Howard Barnes, UNI associate professor and head of the Department of Design, Family and Consumer Sciences, the session is important because culture is far more than heritage and plays a role in many things, including the way parents rear their children.



The series features prominent national researchers and practitioners and is designed for professionals, including teachers, child care providers, social workers, counselors, psychologists and others who work with families. College students are also welcome to attend.

The UNI College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the Department of Design, Family and Consumer Sciences are co-sponsors of the event. Additional details about the series are available at www.extension.iastate.edu/culture. For information about the UNI downlink, and to register for this event, contact Donna Andrusyk at (319) 882-4275 or andrusyk@iastate.edu

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Homework: How much is enough?

General guidelines for teachers suggest they give little or no homework until the upper-elementary years, 30 to 60 minutes a night through sixth grade, 90 minutes a night in middle school, and up to two-and-a-half hours a night during the high school years. 'There is a strong correlation between the amount of time spent outside of school engaged in academics and academic achievement at the high school level,' explains Rick Traw, head of UNI's Department of Curriculum and Instruction. That same increase does not occur to the same extent in the elementary grades, says Traw, and thus the general agreement that children in elementary school don't need a lot of homework.

Traw explains that the best forms of homework are those that make real-world applications of school learning, as opposed to worksheets.

He says parents who want to help children with homework should be aware of what not to do. 'What you don't want to do is make the home an extension of the classroom. You don't want to hover over the children and monitor every little piece of the homework as they go through with it. If you do that, you run the chance of stressing them out, and making them feel that home is just another structured environment.

Rick Traw, head, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, (319) 273-2167, rick.traw@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Wind power -- is it worth the cost?

The state of Iowa is encouraging municipalities and power companies to build renewable energy generating systems. The three most common systems are wind, solar and hydro (water). According to Recayi Pecen, UNI assistant professor of industrial technology, renewable energy is a great concept, but users must carefully choose a system.

'Windmills are great in Iowa during the winter,' says Pecen. 'We have steady winds during the winter, but during the summer we don't have those steady winds to generate electricity for air conditioning. The converse is true of solar energy. We have plenty of sun in the summer, but not during the winter.'

Pecen has just begun research on a hybrid approach to energy production that combines wind and hyrdro power to generate electricity. His research will help cities and power companies evaluate the viability of renewable energy systems. His experimental equipment will be located on the Cedar River near downtown Cedar Falls.

Contact

Recayi Pecen, assistant professor, industrial technology, (319) 273-2598, 277-8622, r.pecen@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Ease of speech is an anomaly, says UNI professor

According to Ken Bleile, professor of communicative disorders, the average person will make nine sounds per second when speaking, using 140,000 neuro-motor movements in that one second -- all just to talk. 'It's really quite amazing and complicated,' he says. In fact, it's so complicated that those in the field of speech development are still astounded by the fact that children acquire language so quickly and easily. 'It's the equivalent of learning algebra or calculus before you learn to add and subtract.'

Bleile says researchers in his field have recently learned that most brain development occurs after birth, not before. 'We also know now that the brain discards cells it does not use or need. It's a selective elimination -- a use-it-or-lose-it principle. For instance, I do not have perfect pitch. But if I'd been born in China, chances are that I would have perfect pitch because I would need it to hear all the pitches in the Chinese language.'

Contact:

Ken Bleile, professor of communicative disorders, (319) 273-2577, 266-4956, ken.bleile@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Family Literacy Day, a day to encourage families of diverse languages and backgrounds to come to the Waterloo Public Library, will be held from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, at the library, 415 Commercial St., Waterloo.

'The whole point of the day is to encourage families of diverse languages and cultures to come to the Waterloo library to sign up for library cards, meet with others in their community, share in some literacy activities using their language, share in cultural activities through arts and crafts, and share in music and food,' said Deborah Tidwell, associate professor of education and TEAMS Project coordinator at the University of Northern Iowa.

Started two years ago by the TEAMS -- Teacher Education Addressing Minority Language Speakers-- Project at UNI, in coordination with the Waterloo Public Library, this year's event is also sponsored by the Waterloo Center for the Arts, the UNI Student Reading Association and the UNI Student Art Education Association.

Tidwell said the event is open to all families-- speakers of English, Spanish, Bosnian, Hmong and other languages. A free book will be given to the first 50 families, provided by the UNI Student Reading Association and the TEAMS Project.

Advance registration is not required.

November 6, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Interpreters Theatre will present 'In: Verse,' a poetry performance, Thursday through Saturday, Nov. 13-15, in Lang Hall, Room 40. Performances begin at 7:30 p.m.

The one-hour poetic extravaganza is written and directed by Katie F-S, a UNI graduate of Cedar Falls. It portrays the triumph of love over everything.

Other cast members of 'In: Verse' include Linda Foulk of Waterloo; Aubrey Hubert, freshman French major, of Cedar Falls; and Jesse Wozniak, senior sociology and humanities major, of Fort Dodge. F-S is also an actor in the cast.

The UNI Interpreters Theatre program is directed by Karen Mitchell, Interpreters Theatre artistic director, and Paul Siddens, associate professor of communication studies.

The performances are free and open to the public, but seating is limited. For more information contact Karen Mitchell at (319) 273-2640.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- In its first month of competition, the University of Northern Iowa's individual events speech team has been very successful. The team traveled to Northern Illinois University Oct. 3-5, where two tournaments were held; Winona State University, Oct. 10-12; Mankato State University, also two tournaments, Oct. 17-19; and Wartburg College, Oct. 25.

Danielle Dick, a senior culture and communication major from Dayton, won second place in communication analysis at the first tournament at Northern Illinois; and fourth place in program oral interpretation at a second tournament there. At Winona, Dick won third place in both program oral interpretation and prose, and fourth place in communication analysis. At Mankato, Dick won second place at both tournaments in communication analysis, and fifth place at the first tournament and third place at the second tournament in prose. She has qualified for the National Individual Events Tournament, to be held in the spring, in communication analysis.

At Northern Illinois, Sara Gronstal, a senior elementary education major from Council Bluffs, won second place at the first tournament and first place at the second tournament in program oral interpretation. She also won first place in after dinner speaking at the second tournament. At the Winona tournament, Gronstal won first place in after dinner speaking, first place in program oral interpretation and first place in dramatic interpretation, and was named the overall second most successful individual competitor. At Mankato, Gronstal won second place at the first tournament and first place at the second tournament in after dinner speaking. Also at the first Mankato tournament, she placed fifth in program oral interpretation, first in dramatic interpretation, sixth in prose and third in individual sweepstakes. At Wartburg, Gronstal won third in prose and fifth in poetry. She has qualified for the National Individual Events Tournament in after dinner speaking and program oral interpretation.

Mike Hilkin, a sophomore English education major from Dubuque, won first place in novice impromptu at the second tournament at Northern Illinois. At Wartburg, Hilkin won sixth in extemporaneous speaking in the varsity division.

Phil Rippke, a junior general communications major from Moville, won first place in communication analysis at both tournaments at Northern Illinois. He also won fourth place in impromptu and seventh place in extemporaneous speaking at the first tournament. At Winona State, Rippke won first place in impromptu, second place in communication analysis, fourth place in extemporaneous speaking and was named the overall third most successful individual competitor. At Wartburg, Rippke placed third in extemporaneous speaking. He also won first in impromptu. He has qualified for the National Individual Events Tournament in communication analysis and impromptu.

At Wartburg, two new members of the team also competed, Coltrane Carlson, a freshman sports broadcasting major, from Council Bluffs, and Janelle Holden, a freshman with an undecided major, from Manchester. According to Cate Palczewski, UNI professor of communication studies, and acting director of forensics, the team next travels to Bradley University for the largest and most competitive tournament of the semester, Nov. 8-9.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- In its first month of competition, the University of Northern Iowa's debate team has been very successful, while traveling to tournaments at Wichita State University, Kansas City Kansas Community College (KCKCC), Macalester College, and Wayne State University.

At Wichita State, Sept. 25-28, Eric Short, a senior general communications major from Brookings, S.D., won third best individual speaker in the tournament. Michelle Kelsey, a senior political communication major from Ankeny, won 11th place speaker honors. The tournament included teams from Baylor University, the University of Kansas and the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

At the Kansas City tournament, Oct. 10-12, Kim Adams, a sophomore elementary education major from Des Moines, along with a debater from KCKCC, received third place honors in the novice division. Cate Palczewski, UNI director of debate, was named the outstanding critic at the tournament, as voted by the student competitors from other schools.

At Macalester, Oct. 17-19, Amie Steffen, a sophomore political communication major from Muscatine, won the top speaker award and first place in the novice division. Eric Short won second speaker in the varsity division.

At Wayne State University, Nov. 1-3, Eric Short and Michelle Kelsey won ninth place in the varsity division. Both were also named in the top 10 speakers for the tournament. Nate Fredericks, a senior communication/theatre arts 7-12 major from Des Moines, and Kelsey Harr, a junior general communication major from Des Moines, won second place in the junior varsity division. Harr was named third best overall speaker, and Fredericks was 10th best.

The debate team next travels Nov. 13-17. The varsity team will attend a tournament at Wake Forest University and the junior varsity and novice teams will attend a tournament at Washington University in St. Louis.

November 5, 2003 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Barbara Cutter, assistant professor of history at the University of Northern Iowa, will give a short presentation and sign copies of her new book at 7 p.m., Monday, Nov. 10, at Bought Again Books, 903 W. 23rd St., Cedar Falls.

Cutter's book, 'Domestic Devils, Battlefield Angels: the Radicalism of American Womanhood 1830-1865,' examines four groups of women at the center of public controversy in 19th-century America: accused murderesses, prostitutes, public speaking reformers and Civil War workers.

The event is free and open to the public.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The social construction and organization of labor within the Amana Society will be the topic of the next history lecture at the University of Northern Iowa, Wednesday, Nov 12.

Peter Hoehnle, doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Iowa State University, will speak at 7 p.m. in Seerley Hall, Room 115. His address, 'Common Work, Common Lives: The Social Construction of Work in the Amana Society,' is free and open to the public. It is the third in the 2003-2004 Phi Alpha Theta/Department of History Lecture Series.

Hoehnle said he will focus on religious and social implications of work to members of the Amana Society and some general insights into the communal economy, paying particular attention to the experiences of women, children and hired workers of the Society.

Hoehnle is an Amana native and received his undergraduate degree from Cornell College. He has written articles on the Amanas and other Iowa history topics, and just published a short book, 'The Amana People: The History of a Religious Community.'



The series is sponsored by the UNI Department of History, Phi Alpha Theta history honorary organization and the UNI History Club. It will continue Feb. 11, 2004, with 'Marketing the Myth: Selling the Lewis and Clark Expedition.'

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Board of Regents to meet at the University of Northern Iowa

The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, will meet Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 11 and 12 at the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls. Several items pertaining to UNI are on the docket and are scheduled to be discussed on Wednesday. Specific times are unknown. Not all sources will be present at the meeting. Media kits will be available at 8:30 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 12 in Maucker Union, Old Central Ballroom. The docket is available on the Web at http://www2.state.ia.us/regents/Meetings/Agendas/agenda.html

1. Annual Report on Student Retention and Graduation Rates

Two related news releases were distributed on 11/6. They will be included in the media kit.

- UNI's four-year graduation rate is at an all-time high 33.5 percent, up from 29.5 percent in 1998

- The average UNI student graduates in 4.5 years

- UNI's retention rate for first-year African-American students increased 10 percent from last year

- UNI's new online Plan of Study went live on Oct. 27. It's an online planning tool for undergraduate students to help them graduate as efficiently as possible.

Contacts:

Susan Koch, associate provost, (319) 273-2518

Renee Romano, vice president for educational & student services, (319) 273-2331

Julie Heiple, data access administrator, (319) 273-7431

2. Annual Purchasing Report

UNI has saved more than $70,000 to date in postal costs alone by collaborating with the University of Iowa Mail Center.

Contact: Bill McKinley, assistant director of campus services, (319) 273-6109

3. Report on Expenditures for Insurance and Retirement Programs, fiscal year 2003

Contacts:

Nick Bambach, director of Human Resource Services, (319) 273-2423

Jan Flick, benefits manager, (319) 273-2824

4. Special Purpose Appropriations Requests

See requests memo in media kit.

Contacts:

Keith Saunders, assistant director of governmental relations, (319) 273-6144

Ag-based Industrial Lubricants Research Program (ABIL) -- Lou Honary, ABIL director,

(319) 352-5218

Iowa Waste Reduction Center -- John Konefes, IWRC director, (319) 273-8905

Geography Alliance of Iowa -- Kay Weller, associate professor of geography (319) 273-7343

Iowa Mathematics & Science Coalition -- Larry Leutzinger, associate professor of mathematics,

(319) 273-6958

Iowa Safe Surfacing Initiative -- Donna Thompson, director, National Program for Playground Safety, (319) 273-2416

5. Register of Capital Improvement Business Transitions

a. Student Health Center expansion -- Presentation of schematic designs. Students are planning to attend the meeting and lobby for approval of the design. Last month the BOR approved the program statement for the expansion. A backgrounder will be included in the media kit.

Contact: Renee Romano, vice president for educational & student services, (319) 273-2331



b. McLeod Center -- Approval requested to amend initial architect/engineer agreement. The BOR requested a feasibility study, which was conducted. The university has been advised by a consultant that certain upgrades in the planned structure will increase the possibility of self-sufficiency. Among these recommendations are upgrades to the alumni suite, and the addition of a catwalk, retractable seating and a kitchen/commissary area. Cost for the updgrades would be approximately $2.6 million.

Contacts:

Fundraising -- Bill Calhoun, vice president for university advancement, (319) 273-2487

Business/operations -- Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance, (319) 273-2382

Facility -- Morris Mikkelsen, director, Facilities Planning, (319) 273-2611

6. Northern Iowa Student Government (NISG) presentation

NISG President, Emiliano Lerda, will address the effect state budget cuts have had on students. A printout of his PowerPoint presentation will be included in the media kit. He will be available for interviews at the meeting.

Contact: Emiliano Lerda, NISG president, (319) 273-2650

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Visiting Artists/Scholars Series in the Department of Art will host artist Ron Meyers at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11 in the Kamerick Art Building, Room 111; and artist Andre Stitt at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 17, in the foyer of the Waterloo Center for the Arts.

Meyers has been a ceramic artist and educator for more than 30 years. He is a professor emeritus at the University of Georgia and has presented numerous workshops and demonstrations of his work throughout the United States and overseas.

Stitt, born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, is considered one of Europe's foremost performance artists. Since 1976 he has created hundreds of performances at major galleries, festivals and sites around the world. He is the director of the time-based art course at Cardiff School of Art. Both the course, and his work focus on contemporary interdisciplinary practices such as performance art, video, installation, sonic, interactive and Webcasting.

The events are free, open to the public, and sponsored by the Martha Ellen Tye Visiting Artists Fund.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK), a national leadership honor society at the University of Northern Iowa, will initiate new members, Sunday, Nov. 9, in the Commons' Slife Ballroom, and award honorary membership to a distinguished alumnus.

U.S. Sen. Charles Grassley, who received B.A. and M.A.E. degrees from UNI, in 1955 and 1956, respectively, will be inducted, following his noon address to the organization. A reception, beginning at 11:30 a.m., will precede his remarks, while dinner and formal induction of the new student members will follow.

'UNI did not have a chapter of ODK when Sen. Grassley was a student,' said Frank Thompson, ODK adviser and a UNI professor of finance. 'Honorary membership may be awarded to someone who has shown outstanding leadership in the community and the members chose to honor him in this way.'



New student initiates to ODK will include __(Name)__ a __(Classification)__ from __(Hometown)__.

To qualify for membership, students must volunteer for campus and community services and leadership activities, demonstrate academic achievement and be a junior or senior. The organization was founded in 1914, and emphasizes the development of the student as a whole person, both as a member of the college community and as a contributor to society.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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