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News Release Archive

August 14, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Scholarships have been awarded to 23 minority students who will begin their studies this fall at the University of Northern Iowa.

___(Name)___ of ___(Address/Hometown)___, will receive a ___(scholarship name)___ scholarship.

Multicultural Achievement and Talent Scholarships are based on a formula using several criteria, including rank in class, ACT, GPA and financial need. They range in value from $200 to $1,500, and are renewable for three years with a 2.75 GPA or above.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

August 13, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa was the only educational institution in a six-state Midwest region to receive the 2002-03 Award of Excellence from the Association for Career and Technical Education, Region 3.

The award was given in recognition of UNI's collaborative efforts with community colleges, including articulation agreements. Articulation agreements mesh programs between two-year and four-year schools so that students can transfer credits earned at one institution to the other.

Accepting the award on behalf of UNI was Charles Johnson, professor of industrial technology, who has been instrumental in formulating articulation agreements with Iowa community colleges. About 300 articulation agreements have been signed with all 15 community colleges in the state. The majority of these program-to-program agreements enable graduates of technical programs at the community colleges to make a smooth transition toward completion of a major at UNI.

The award, a plaque, was presented at the group's annual conference held in Dubuque in June. Rockwell Collins in Cedar Rapids was the only business to receive the award in Region 3.

August 10, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Scholarships have been awarded to 55 transfer students who will begin their studies this fall on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

___(Name)___ of ___(Address/Hometown)___, will receive a ___(scholarship name)___ scholarship.

Transfer achievement scholarships are based on a combination of rank in class and financial need. They range in value from $200 to $1,000, and are renewable for a second year.

The Phi Theta Kappa scholarship is available to students who are members of this honorary society at the community college from which they are transferring. A GPA of 3.5 or above is required and recipients must demonstrate leadership and involvement in their campus or community. The two-year scholarship is worth $1,000 per year for Iowa residents, and ranges from $1,000 to $2,000 per year for non-residents.

The Transfer Multicultural Achievement and Talent Scholarship is awarded to incoming ethnic- minority transfer students based on a formula using GPA and financial need. They range in value from $200 to $1,000, and are renewable for a second year with a 2.75 GPA or above.

The Clyde & Grace Sanborn Scholarship is presented to students transferring to UNI from Iowa Lakes Community College in Estherville. Students must be enrolled fulltime, in good academic standing, possess leadership and citizenship qualities and demonstrate financial need. The scholarship is renewable with a 3.0 GPA.

The Fleming Sisters Scholarship is awarded to elementary or secondary education majors. The $1,000 award is available for residents of Tama or Benton County, Iowa and is based on financial need. The scholarship is renewable with a satisfactory GPA.

The Mapes Education Scholarship is awarded on the basis of financial need or exemplary academic performance to a student pursuing a teacher education-related program of study. It is a one-year scholarship and varies in amount each year.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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Will rising Muslim birth rate impact future governments?



Some in Israel have expressed concern that Palestinian and Muslim birth rates are rising, while the Israeli fertility rate is dropping significantly, thus raising questions about the future population's influence on the politics of the region. Dhirendra Vajpeyi, professor of political science at the University of Northern Iowa, says while a significant number of Palestinians are Christian, the majority are Muslim, and the political ramifications could be significant. 'If you look at fertility rates of Muslims all over the world, compared to those of other religions, the Muslim rate is highest,' he says, adding that similar concerns have been expressed in other countries, including India where every religious group's birth rate is going down, except for Muslims'. Does this imbalance in population growth mean more political upheaval for the future?

Contacts:

Dhirendra Vajpeyi, professor of political science, (319) 273-2275, 273-2039

Vicki Grimes, Office of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



To download or not to download

University students across the country have been sued after downloading and sharing other copyrighted files from the Internet With the advent of the Digital Millennium Act, U.S. colleges and universities are scrambling to put into place polices that protect students' rights and inform them of their responsibilities and liabilities under the law. 'Like most institutions, UNI already had policies and procedures regarding respect for copyright law and acceptable use of network resources,' explains Steve Moon, director of network services at UNI. 'But we have had to put in place automated procedures for dealing with the weekly complaints, scale up our efforts to communicate with our users regarding their responsibilities and liabilities, and change language to specifically include MP3 and MPEG files and references to peer-to-peer file sharing programs and their dangers.' Moon says access to the Internet doesn't change an individual's responsibility to respect the property rights of others.

Contacts:

Steve Moon, director, UNI network services, (319) 273-6813, (319) 277-1390 steve.moon@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Choosing a daycare center

Almost every parent struggles, at one time or another, with the issue of daycare. Many worry about leaving their children in the care of others, and many more are concerned about the effect of all-day care by a non-parent. If you do your homework, says Rheta DeVries, director of the Regents Center for Early Developmental Education at the University of Northern Iowa, there's really little reason to worry.

'I don't think we should conclude that day care is bad for childrenï¾—but that bad day care is bad for children,' she says. 'Research has shown that the single most distinguishing characteristic that defines good day care is that the teachers have had training in child development.'

Contacts:

Rheta DeVries, director, Regents Center for Early Development Education, (319) 232-1958, rheta.devries@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

August 7, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa senior biology major Katie Venter of Oskaloosa and UNI assistant professor of health education Catherine Zeman spent a week in June in the Transylvania region of Romania as part of a student research program funded by the UNI Environmental Health Initiative.

The project, called the 2003 Research Project and Student Training Experience in Drinking Water and Pesticide Exposure Evaluation, involved testing water samples in Transylvania for the harmful pesticide DDT. Previous research conducted by Zeman and her Romanian colleagues found that contaminated water in Transylvania puts children who drink it at risk for developmental complications of fine motor coordination and learning.



The purpose of this year's research was to determine the level of DDT in the water supply using a method called gas chromatography. Venter worked with Romanian chemists and toxicologists from the Romanian Institute of Public Health, learning their water analysis methods and comparing them to the American method.

'This experience offered me the opportunity to understand and experience the challenges that colleagues in other cultural settings must face when implementing and designing a public health program,' said Venter. 'This has been one of the greatest experiences of my academic career.'

The results and exposure models that Venter, Zeman and their colleagues were working on are still in the process of being completed.

August 4, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- More than 750 incoming freshmen at the University of Northern Iowa have been awarded freshmen achievement scholarships based on a combination of their rank in class and financial need.



The scholarships range in value from $200 to $1,500, and are renewable for a second year with a 3.0 GPA or above.

___(Name)___ of ___(Hometown)___, a 2003 high school graduate, will receive a scholarship.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

August 3, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Two University of Northern Iowa art students were among the first-ever group of 15 students who exhibited at the 2003 Des Moines Arts Festival. The students were chosen by a juried panel. The artists participated as part of the Emerging Iowa Artists Program, which was created to help students see if they could make a living selling art in Iowa.

David Schmitz, from Charles City, is a sophomore art major with an emphasis in drawing. He exhibited 15 pieces in charcoal, graphite and pastel.

Angela Pease, from Cedar Falls, is a senior art major with an emphasis in painting. She exhibited mixed-media 3-D works.

Pease will graduate in December and plans to pursue graduate school. Her lifelong dream is to teach at the college level and continue to produce artwork for commercial sale and gallery exhibits. Her experience and success at the Des Moines Arts Festival exceeded her expectations. She had hoped to sell just one piece of her work and ended up selling 12 pieces.

'It was a real confidence booster. I was so impressed with the Des Moines Arts Festival. So many of the professional artists selling their works stopped by to offer encouragement and advice for future festivals. Speaking with fellow artists was one of my favorite parts of the Festival,' said Pease.

Pease credits much of her success to UNI's art department. 'The professors have such a broad range of talents and they are always there to assist the students with their questions. The professional practices course prepared me for how to make slides and get ready for juried shows.'

The Des Moines Arts Festival was a life changing experience for Schmitz. He had hoped to sell three to four pieces. He sold 10.

'The best part about the Festival was not selling the art, it was the feedback from the customers and visitors. When people can relate an experience or story to a piece of my work, then I know my art is successful,' said Schmitz.



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Justice vs. freedom of the press

The judge in the Kobe Bryant case has threatened reporters who dare print the name of the alleged victim, saying he won't allow them into the courtroom. Media outlets have cried foul, and are suing for the right to use the young woman's name. Julie Thompson, sexual/substance abuse coordinator at UNI, says there are very good reasons for keeping secret the names of rape victims while an investigation is pending. 'Once the name is revealed, victims are often harassed or stalked. And there's still a great deal of shame and humiliation involved with a sexual assault. Coming forward in the first place is very difficult, even when the name is shielded. Of course, it shouldn't be that way -- the shame should be on the one who committed the assault.'

Thompson says society has a long way to go in helping victims feel less shame about an assault. But she has some ideas about what needs to be changed. 'Look at the language we use when talking about a sexual assault; it's passive. We say 'she was raped' and not 'he raped her.' We have to stop asking questions that give the implication the victim is responsible. And we also have to let go of the idea that it couldn't have been rape if the involved parties knew one another.'

Contact

Julie Thompson, sexual/substance abuse coordinator, (319) 989-2061, Julie.Thompson@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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UNI professor says voting is a choice

The 38th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 is Wednesday, Aug. 6. The act was passed to ensure access to the ballot for all citizens, but statistics show that a large portion of today's U.S. population simply does not vote. That's not necessarily a bad thing, says Tom Rice, head of UNI's Department of Political Science. He says it's important for children to learn about the democratic process, and to understand that they have the right to vote. But demanding that everyone vote doesn't help the democratic process and could, says Rice, hinder it. 'What you end up with is a large number of votes from people who don't understand the issues or the candidates,' he explains. 'I'm not sure that's what we want.''

Contact:

Tom Rice, head, Department of Political Science, 218-732-8335, tom.rice@uni.edu, pinehavenbeach@hotmail.com

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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Watergate anniversary

On Aug. 8, 1974, Richard Nixon became the first U.S. president to resign from office. Plagued by the Watergate scandal, Nixon was facing imminent impeachment and possible removal from office. It was a turbulent time, but John Johnson, professor of history, said some good things emerged from what was probably the greatest political scandal in American history. 'In the long run, the rule of law triumphed. The Constitution prevailed. We had a governmental change without upheaval. Initial American anger and cynicism over Richard Nixon's actions and statements have receded in the last generation, and the accomplishments and shortcomings of the Nixon administration can now be seen in a broader historical perspective.'

In 1974, Johnson was critical of President Gerald Ford's pardon of Nixon. Now he believes the pardon was a wise course of action, sparing the country further trauma from Watergate. 'I think President Ford was right: It was time for us to stop wallowing in Watergate; the country needed to get on with other business.'

Contact:

John Johnson, professor of history, (319) 273-2097, 277-7130, John.Johnson@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations

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July 31, 2003 - 7:00pm

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From Thursday, Aug. 7 through Sunday, Aug. 17, UNI will exhibit its new booth and display at the state fair in Des Moines, in the Varied Industries Building. This year's themes are 'UNI Students First' and 'Community Leaders.' Featured will be photos and profiles of university alumni, all living in Iowa and contributing to the state's growth.

Other UNI highlights:

Thursday, Aug. 7, 10 a.m. to noon: Ed Rathmell, professor of mathematics, will present 'Thinking with Numbers,' testing visitors on math proficiency.

Thursday, Aug. 7, 1 to 3 p.m., Karla Krueger, instructor in the College of Education (COE); and Yana Cornish, program assistant in the COE, will present the InTime program, a Web-based project that showcases the best teaching practices involving technology.

Friday, Aug. 8, 11 a.m. to noon, Kirk Henderson, manager of the UNI Roadside Office, will discuss the Native Roadside Vegetation Center, Iowa's initiative for planting wildflowers along state and county roads.

Friday, Aug. 8, 2 to 4 p.m., Scott Nice, assistant professor of theatre, and Sarah Noll, a UNI senior from Dubuque, will dress as clowns and walk the fairgrounds.

Saturday, Aug. 9, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Pat Higby, energy educator for UNI's Center for Energy and Environmental Education, will present 'Racing Toward the Future,' a display about the battery-powered-car race for high school students, the Iowa Electrathon.

Wednesday, Aug. 13, 10 a.m. to noon, and 1 to 2 p.m., Sue Grosboll, director of the UNI Museum, will wear period costume and discuss the museum's one-room school.

Saturday, Aug. 16, 10 a.m. to noon, Recayi Pecen, assistant professor of industrial technology, will discuss UNI's solar 'e-boat,' a 110-pound fiberglass solar electric boat designed by students.

Saturday, Aug. 16, 1 to 2 p.m., John McCormick, professor of computer science, will discuss embedded computer systems. His class has completed a project which consists of three miles of railroad track and a series of small trains, each controlled by an embedded computer system. On display will be the track and trains.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa student athletes achieved an impressive cumulative GPA of 3.06 for the spring 2003 semester. Encompassing 346 students, the cumulative athletic GPA has been steadily increasing for the past several years.

A cumulative athletic GPA over 3.00 is considered impressive, according to Colleen Heimstead, compliance and life skills coordinator for UNI intercollegiate athletics. The average UNI undergraduate has a 2.97 GPA.



Even more impressive is the fact that these achievements have been accomplished without an athletic academic adviser on staff. 'Due to budget cuts, we have not replaced our academic adviser for athletics,' Heimstead explained. 'Most schools our size have at least one, if not two or three advisers. We've been without one for a year, but the coaches have really stepped up to the challenge and made sure academics are a priority.'

The women's volleyball team ranks the highest overall, with a 3.44 GPA. Men's golf is the highest men's team with a cumulative GPA of 3.18.

'I think this says a lot about the quality of our program,' said Heimstead. 'Not only do we offer excellent athletic opportunities, but we also ensure that education remains the highest priority. It's a great advantage to attending UNI.'

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July 30, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa has added a master's degree to its athletic training program. Recently approved by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, the degree will require 36 hours, with the majority of time focused on advanced training. Classes such as Pathoetiology, Orthopedic Assessment, and Orthopedic Surgical Interventions will be offered, as well as Evidence-Based Rehabilitative Practice, where hands-on training will put classroom theories into practice.

'It's been a long haul to get this program together,' says Biff Williams, head of the athletic training program. 'The master's degree will allow us to place graduate assistants in high schools and within the medical community. It's a great fit with the partnership between the university and the Cedar Valley medical community.'

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Resident assistants and community advisers have been named at the University of Northern Iowa for the 2003-2004 academic year.

Jessica (Jessi) Fisher of Ogden, a sophomore majoring in finance/real estate, is one of approximately 85 resident assistants (RAs) in the UNI Department of Residence. Fisher will serve in Hagemann Hall. RAs serve as student advisers to approximately 40 students in a residence hall, providing assistance with personal, interpersonal and academic concerns. The RAs also support residents in the development of a cohesive living and learning group.

RAs are certified in first aid and CPR, receive extensive training in conflict mediation and are the university's contact for students in the residence halls. In addition, they plan and present educational programs, offer planned and spontaneous social activities and provide academic support for students.

'RAs are vital to the success of the University of Northern Iowa residence system. They provide models for leadership while maintaining high academic standards,' said Lyn Redington, associate director of the Department of Residence/Housing.

July 29, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, recently approved a pilot plan developed by the UNI Department of Residence, allowing students living in the residence halls to receive the same dining/housing rate for the first and second years of their contracts. The '2-Year Advantage' plan also allows students to move to campus the Thursday before classes begin at no extra charge, and it waives the $200 pre-payment charge during the second year of the contract.

Pat Beck, assistant director of residence/marketing, said the plan may include other benefits as it evolves. 'Immediately, it helps families budget for the cost of higher education,' she said. 'The true and lasting advantage comes with the benefits students gain from a multi-year experience in residence hall communities.'

A similar program has been developed at Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., where it has been successful.

Residence hall rates at UNI -- and the other regent institutions -- have risen steadily since 1988. In 2003, the rate increase was $278, or nearly 6 percent. Beck believes the 2-Year Advantage plan will, ultimately, help control costs in the future. 'Having more residents on campus builds stronger communities, improves our efficiency and makes it possible to keeps costs down for all residents,' she said.

Information about the plan was presented during student orientation sessions this summer, and sent to all students who have a fall contract for housing in UNI residence halls. If you would like more information, contact the Department of Residence, (319) 273-2333.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A group of research scientists-in-the-making will present the results of their summer research projects on biology, chemistry, physics and earth science on the University of Northern Iowa campus, Friday, Aug. 1, at the Merck/American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Summer Undergraduate Research Poster Session.

Forty-six UNI students and six Upward Bound high school students will display posters describing their work and be available to discuss their research. Student posters will be exhibited from noon to 1:30 p.m., in the Great Reading Room of Seerley Hall, Room 116.

'For students, summer research is an experience that coalesces what they have learned in individual courses into a coherent picture, and faculty have an opportunity to work with some of the brightest students on campus,' said Carl Thurman, UNI associate professor of biology, who directs the Undergraduate Science Research Program funded by Merck/AAAS. Merck provided funding for five of the students. Upward Bound is a federal program that helps prepare high school students for college entrance.

The meeting will open at 11 a.m., with a presentation titled 'King Cholera Dethroned!' by Dr. Stanley G. Schultz, dean of the College of Medicine at the University of Texas, Houston. He will describe the discovery of the mode of transmission of cholera to demonstrate the essentials of science: observation, experiment and analytic reasoning.

UNI is one of 15 U.S. colleges and universities that received an award from Merck/AAAS. The program, which aims to promote interdisciplinary research experiences among undergraduates, is funded by the Merck Company Foundation, a private charitable foundation established by pharmaceutical manufacturer Merck & Co., and administered by the AAAS, the world's largest federation of scientific and engineering societies.

July 28, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– A five-member team from the University of Northern Iowa recently participated in the 10th Annual World Championship Solar Electric Boat Regatta, taking second place in the qualifying round of the 70-meter sprint. The team's 17-foot long solar powered boat finished with a time of 15.54 seconds and a total of 94.86 out of 100 points in that event.

Team members were UNI seniors Chad Clark of Cedar Rapids, Dan Frisch of Waterloo and Aaron Mitchell of Manchester; May 2003 graduate Derek Paulus of Rockford; and Recayi Pecen, UNI assistant professor of industrial technology and program coordinator for the electrical and information engineering technology program. The team also received the perseverance award at the competition. They ranked 17th overall out of 27 registered teams.

The competition took place last month in Buffalo, N.Y., and included teams from the United States, Canada and Europe. The teams competed in four events including qualifications, solar sprint, solar slalom and solar endurance.

UNI's solar 'eBoat' is sponsored by Blain's Farm and Fleet, John Deere Product Engineering Center, Iowa Energy Center, Optima Batteries, Rockwell Collins, WBM Marine and UNI. The project also has been funded for a three-year period by a $15,000 grant from the Iowa Energy Center.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Department of Accounting has named scholarship recipients for the 2003-04 academic year. The department awarded 29 undergraduate scholarships and 13 Master of Accounting (MAcc) scholarships, together totaling more than $80,000.

The (name of scholarship) in the amount of ($_____) was awarded to (name) from (hometown). For more information, contact Gerald Smith, Accounting department head, at 319-273-2394.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

July 27, 2003 - 7:00pm

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Pretrial publicity doesn't spoil juries

Now that NBA star Kobe Bryant has been charged with felony sexual assault, the media has worked overtime to broadcast any and all information available about the basketball phenom and his alleged victim. When there is so much information out there, is it reasonable to expect a fair trial? Keith Crew, head of UNI's Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology says yes. 'We're too quick to think that a jury is somehow incapable of putting that aside and listening to the facts. While in some cases pretrial publicity may prevent a fair trial, in most, jurors can be educated to the fact that they have not heard all the evidence.'

Crew also believes this level of pretrial publicity, while distasteful, is 'just reality in our society with its pervasive mass media. When a case involves a celebrity or is particularly gruesome, then you're going to get this level of publicity. I don't like it, but I don't think we can stop it without causing greater problems.'

Contacts

Keith Crew, head, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology, (319) 273-2786, 266-6504, bk.crew@uni.edu,

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Don't worry, be happy

August is National Admit You're Happy Month. During August, people are encouraged to express happiness and look at the bright side of things. According to David Towle, director of the UNI Counseling Center, a positive outlook isn't simply a good idea -- it can be good for your mental and physical health. Towle can explain how a positive attitude can help college students succeed in the often stressful environment of higher education.

Contacts:

David Towle, director, UNI Counseling Center, (319) 273-2676, (319) 266-7686, david.towle@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Immunization -- not just for little kids

August is national Immunization Awareness Month. Each year tens of thousands of Americans die from diseases that can be prevented by vaccines. Most adults know that children must be vaccinated before starting elementary school. But many people don't know that before students can enter a college or university they must prove they're vaccinated for measles. Sue Courts, director of the UNI Student Health Clinic, can explain what vaccinations are mandatory for college students and explain the importance of flu shots.

Contacts:

Sue Courts, director, UNI Student Health Clinic, (319) 273-7224, (319) 277-3352, sue.courts@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



High school students woefully under-prepared for college writing

Increasingly, high school students are coming to colleges and universities unprepared to write at the college level. 'That's one of my biggest frustrations,' said James HiDuke, also known as Dr. Grammar, assistant professor of English language and literature at the University of Northern Iowa. Contributing to the problem, he said, are teachers who, pressed for time, simply do not correct students' incorrect grammar. 'There's a philosophy that says we don't want Johnny to feel bad about the work he's done, so we don't give him any negative feedback,' explained HiDuke. 'That's wrong. Someone has to say that there are rules for written language, and that the rules should be followed.'

Contacts:

James HiDuke, professor of English, University of Northern Iowa, (319) 273-2819, (319) 277-5429, james.hiduke@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

July 21, 2003 - 7:00pm

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Safety emphasized in UNI Web workshop for middle school students

Another group of students in the ECHOES (Every Child Has the Opportunity to Excel and Succeed) program that serves sixth- through ninth-grade students in the Waterloo and Cedar Falls Community School Districts, is on the University of Northern Iowa campus through Thursday, July 24, for a workshop on 'Creating Web Pages.' The class meets from 9:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., in Lang Hall, Room 245.

The workshop, offered by ITS-Educational Technology at UNI, is focusing on how to use an HTML (HyperText Markup Language) editor to create a Web page and how to add graphics and work with digital cameras. Safety on the Web will be the focus at the beginning of Wednesday's class, and students will fine-tune their pages and share them with the class on Thursday.

Instructors are Jason Vetter and Lori Seawel, education technology specialists at UNI. They can be contacted outside the workshop hours, as well, for those who wish to pursue any of these topics.

July 20, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Ag-Based Industrial Lubricants (ABIL) Research Program will host its annual Pioneer Farmers' Day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, July 25, at the ABIL facility, 400 Technology Place, Waverly.

A news conference will begin at 1 p.m., to announce that Norfolk Southern, a rail transportation company based in Roanoke, Va., has converted its entire fleet to SoyTrakï¾™, a biodegradable soybean oil-based grease developed by ABIL as an alternative to petroleum-based grease for lubricating railroad tracks. The conversion makes SoyTrak one of the most widely-used soy-based rail curve products in the country.

During the news conference, ABIL also will announce the establishment of Biobased Industries LLC, a for-profit company that has signed a grease blending and packaging agreement with Environmental Lubricants Manufacturing Inc. (ELM), in Waverly. Portec Rail Products Inc. in Pittsburgh, will be the product distributor. Biobased Industries began at Lanehaven Farms near Waterloo, as a pilot modular grease-production unit funded through ABIL by a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture in 2001. Its success led to the formation of Biobased Industries LLC.

Lou Honary, ABIL director, said Farmers' Day also will give area farmers and other interested individuals a chance to tour ELM's Plainfield facility from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., and see the latest in research and development of high-tech biobased lubricants, specifically soybean-based greases.

Sponsored by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Farmers' Day is free and open to the public. For more information, call ABIL at (319) 352-5218.

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Endangered turtles, other endangered species play important role in ecosystem

Wood turtles are among a number of endangered species of animals in Iowa. Jeff Tamplin, UNI assistant professor of biology, is evaluating their population status to recommend species management policies to help ensure that this animal will not be lost from the central Iowa ecosystem. In other parts of the country, scientists have worked to restore populations of other species, occasionally reviving their numbers to the point of causing problems for humans and other animals. Tamplin will comment on his work with Iowa wood turtles and their role in the ecosystem.

Contacts:

Jeff Tamplin, UNI assistant professor of biology, (319) 273-2327 (office); (319) 273-2456 (department office; jeff.tamplin@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, Office of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Childhood mental illness -- more common than you think

CNN recently reported that one out of every five children has a mental illness. Ken Jacobsen, counselor at UNI's Counseling Center, says the number of mental health illnesses is on the rise among children and he is seeing the effects in his office. 'What's happening in college counseling centers across the country is people are coming to us with lengthy medical histories from their childhoods.' He says there are warning signs parents can look for in their children such as poor performance in school, anti-social behavior and complaints about physical illnesses like headaches and stomach aches on a regular basis. According to Jacobsen, if parents notice warning signs of mental illness in their children, the school counselor is a good place to start. 'Somebody needs to sit down with the child who knows how to talk with kids and get to the bottom of the problem.' He says always consult a mental health professional if you think your child may have a mental illness.

Contacts:

Ken Jacobsen, counselor, UNI Counseling Center, (319) 273-2676, (319) 984-6300; Kenneth.Jacobsen@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Are the new high-tech mosquito traps really effective?

Summer is upon us -- and so are the mosquitoes. Some experts say this year's populations of the blood sucking insects are larger than usual. Mosquitoes mean discomfort and, for many, worries about mosquito-borne diseases such as West Nile virus. On the positive side, consumers have more resources available than ever to help rid their backyards of mosquitoes. Along with the standard spray insecticides, candles and bug zappers, consumers now can buy so-called high-tech electronic mosquito traps. Randy Mercer, an entomologist and UNI assistant professor of biology says the jury is still out on the new high-tech traps. In fact, he says some research shows that the traps may be too effective -- not only do they trap the mosquitoes in your yard, but they draw mosquitoes from your neighbors' yards as well -- adding to your problem, not solving it.

Note to editors/news directors: Mercer is out of his office doing field research on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can leave a message for him at his office, or reach him by e-mail.

Randy Mercer, assistant professor or biology, (319) 273-2150, randy.mercer@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Norfolk Southern Railway, based in Norfolk, Va., recently converted its entire operation to SoyTrakï¾™, a biodegradable soybean oil-based grease developed by the University of Northern Iowa's Ag-Based Industrial Lubricants (ABIL) Research Program. The grease is an alternative to petroleum-based grease for lubricating railroad tracks. Its use reduces rail gauge face-wear and wheel-flange wear when trains go around curves. Summer- and winter-grade blends are in use. An all-season blend is being developed. The conversion will make SoyTrak one of the most-used end-user rail curve products in the country.

'The U.S. market for rail greases is 9 million pounds,' explained Lou Honary, ABIL director. 'Norfolk Southern alone will use more than one-fifth of that amount.'

A news conference to announce the conversion will take place at 1 p.m., Friday, July 25, at the ABIL facility, 400 Technology Place in Waverly. On hand will be U.S. Senators Tom Harkin; State Senator Bob Brunkhorst; State Rep. Willard Jenkins; Patty Judge, Iowa Department of Agriculture secretary; John Samuels, senior vice president of Norfolk Southern Corp.; Richard Jarosinski, president and general manager of the RMP Division with Portec Rail Products Inc., in Pittsburgh; Blake Hollis, president of Biobased Industries LLC; and Honary.

During the news conference, Hollis will announce the establishment of Biobased Industries LLC, a for-profit company that has signed a grease blending and packaging agreement with Environmental Lubricants Manufacturing Inc. (ELM), in Plainfield. Portec Rail Products Inc., will be the product distributor.

Biobased Industries began at Lanehaven Farms near Waterloo, as a pilot modular grease-production unit funded through ABIL by a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture in 2001. Lanehaven's success led to the formation of Biobased Industries LLC. 'When we can take the raw materials produced in Iowa and add value by further processing or differentiating, that is going to result in more dollars spent in Iowa, and more jobs created in Iowa,' said Hollis. 'This is just one example of how it can be done.'

Honary noted that during the past five years, more than 24 railroads have used SoyTrak. 'But Norfolk Southern's approval gives new credibility to bio-based products. Field demonstrations prove that SoyTrak performs at least 20 percent better than conventional greases, adheres better to metal surfaces, does not thin down at high temperatures, and carries up to two miles further on the gauge face than other conventional products.'

Norfolk Southern Corp., is one of America's leading transportation companies. Its Norfolk Southern Railway Company subsidiary operates approximately 21,500 miles of rail in the United States and Canada. Norfolk Southern operates the East's most extensive intermodal network and is the nation's largest rail carrier of automotive parts and finished vehicles.

Formulated from U.S.-grown soybean oils and additives, SoyTrak is marketed by ELM and distributed through Portec Rail Products Inc. Portec Rail Products Inc., contributed field equipment and developmental support during field-testing with Norfolk Southern.

Portec Rail Products Inc., has been involved in the development of rail lubrication and friction management technology since the late 1920s, and is the industry leader in this field.

ABIL is recognized nationally as a leader in the development and commercialization of soybean-based industrial lubricants. Established in 1991, the UNI-ABIL research program brings together research and testing to identify soybean oil characteristics and match them to appropriate industrial uses.

This year ABIL is licensing 24 industrial lubricants, greases and base oils made of soybean oil. For more information about ABlL, visit the Web site, www.uni.edu/abil.

July 16, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Eighteen current or future teachers of high school physics are learning more about their content area at the Summer Physics Institute at the University of Northern Iowa that runs through Friday, July 18.

__(Name)__ of __(School)__ in __(town of school)__ is enrolled in the four-week course that began June 23. Most of the participants took the first part of the two-part institute last summer. The six hours of graduate credit earned each summer can be applied toward a physics or physical sciences endorsement.

This summer's institute is focusing on electricity and magnetism, as well as wave phenomena and optics. Participants have been using technology, probe-ware and simulations.

The institute is offered through UNI's Science and Math Education Renewal Center, a federally funded program designed to provide professional development for K-12 math and science teachers. In addition to having their tuition paid, participants each receive $1,000 per summer in equipment to take back to their school.

'This institute helps ensure that physics teachers are well prepared to teach physics and that their school will meet the goal of 'no child left behind,' which is a well qualified teacher in every classroom,' said Cherin Lee, associate professor of biology and chair of the science education faculty at UNI.

Note: to obtain a list of the teachers, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2461.

July 15, 2003 - 7:00pm

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Board of Regents to meet at UNI

The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, will meet Wednesday and Thursday, July 16 and 17, in Davis Hall of the University of Northern Iowa's Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center. Several issues pertaining to UNI will be on the docket.

Master's degree in athletic training (during meeting of Interinstitutional Committee on Educational Coordination)

Richard (Biff) Williams, assistant professor, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, (319) 273-6824

University final fiscal year 2004 budget

Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2256

Operating appropriations requests for fiscal year 2005

Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2256

Capital budget requests for fiscal year 2005

Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2256

Preliminary five-year capital improvement plans

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance, (319) 273-2382

Report of the banking committee

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance, (319) 273-2382

Five-year institutional roads program

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance, (319) 273-2382



Capital Register

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance, (319) 273-2382

Proposed 'Two-Year Advantage' plan for residence system

Robert Hartman, director of residence, (319) 273-2333



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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A group of Iowa elementary school teachers at the University of Northern Iowa is learning about science and math curriculum materials that focus on the inquiry teaching approach.

__(Name)__ of __(Hometown)__ is one of 13 teachers participating in 'Workshop: Life and Earth Science for Elementary Teachers,' that runs through Friday, July 18. Teachers are participating in the use of FOSS and GEMS curriculum materials. FOSS stands for Full Option Science System, and GEMS stands for Great Explorations in Math and Science.

Both sets of curriculum materials were produced by the Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and emphasize inquiry -- having students ask questions and find answers. Cherin Lee, UNI associate professor of biology and chair of the science education faculty, said it involves a very active learning environment and strives for understanding ideas.

The workshop is offered through UNI's Science and Math Education Renewal Center, a federally funded program designed to provide professional development for K-12 math and science teachers.

GEMS and FOSS modules are available for teachers to check out during the academic year from the Science Education Resource Center, (319) 273-6912, in UNI's Center for Energy and Environmental Education.

Note: to obtain a list of the participants, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations.

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Children of NATO personnel at UNI for international camping experience

The University of Northern Iowa's Camp Adventureï¾™ Youth Services program will host the International Youth Camp, a two-week opportunity for 250 children of NATO personnel beginning Wednesday, July 16. This is the first year in the camp's 32-year history that it has taken place in the United States, and the first time it will take place at a non-military site. The program is operated in cooperation with U.S. Army Child and Youth Services, and the British Army Welfare Service.

Represented nations are Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Norway, Poland, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. The youths, all 15 to 18 years old, will live on the UNI campus. Participants will visit several Iowa sites, including Camp Ingawanis and the Dubuque County Fair. They also will learn crafts, participate in team-building exercises, attend a Cedar Rapids Kernels baseball game; and go canoeing, horseback riding and rock climbing.

More information about the IYC is available online at www.iyc2003.com/.

Media may attend a welcoming event from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. in the Commons Ballroom, on Thursday, July 17. In attendance will be Owen Newlin, president of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa; and UNI President Robert Koob.

Media also may meet the youths and talk with camp administrators during a barbecue near the UNI Campanile that same day from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Media kits will available at that time.

Media may attend these other events, but should contact Don DeGraaf, camp liaison, at (319) 415-7654, to make arrangements:

'Planet Hollywood' at UNI's Piazza, Thursday, July 17, 8 p.m.

Barn dance at Camp Ingawanis, Thursday, July 24, 8 p.m.

'50s dance at UNI's Piazza, Sunday, July 27, 8 p.m.

ROPES course at Camp Ingawanis (several dates; see DeGraaf for information)

Military dignitaries from NATO countries will visit UNI and the surrounding area July 22-25, and attend a reception and dinner in UNI's Commons Ballroom from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, July 24. To meet with them, contact David Edginton, program operations coordinator, UNI School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, (319) 273-2264.

July 13, 2003 - 7:00pm

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Making sense out of weather forecasts

Each day Americans are inundated with local, regional and national weather forecasts. Meteorologists pepper us with an array of facts -- 'a cold front is moving in, the barometric pressure is falling, the dew point is 63 degrees, the heat index is 110.' All this data is meant to better inform us, but do we really understand what it means? UNI associate professor of earth science, and meteorologist, Alan Czarnetzki is an expert at using commons terms to describe the complicated world of meteorology. He has tips on what to listen and look for in weather forecasts.

Contacts:

Alan Czarnetzki, associate professor of earth science, (319) 273-2152, (319) 266-7062, alan.czarnetzki@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Teens who self-injure are expressing pent-up emotion

Susan Dobie, an instructor at UNI, has seen and heard about it far too often: Teens who, suffering from internal emotional pain, inflict physical pain upon themselves. 'For instance, when someone has been sexually or physically abused, they will experience despair, sadness and anger. Often adolescents can't control those feelings. But one thing they can control is their own physical pain,' explains Dobie, who is researching self-injury for her doctoral dissertation. 'They'll use anything they can to cut themselves -- a knife, a broken CD case, a paper clip, a key, anything that's available when they're alone and have feelings that they want to get rid of.'

She says parents and educators of self-injurers often are blind to the practice. 'Those who self-injure quickly become adept liars and skilled deceivers, making it difficult for parents or teachers to notice the practice. They are masters of disguise.'

Contacts:

Susan Dobie, instructor, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, (319) 273-5930, susan.dobie@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Managing vacation with kids -- advance preparation pays

When planning vacations, people often forget that their family is, typically, not normally together 24 hours a day. So when they are, and, especially, when they are in a small space, problems can arise, says Ann Vernon, UNI professor of education and coordinator of UNI's counseling program in the College of Education. Vernon suggests a family meeting before leaving to try to determine each person's interests and needs. 'For example, one person may have a need for space or time alone. It helps to determine ahead of time how much inclusion or privacy each person may want.'

Vernon also suggests making a list of the things everybody wants to do before leaving and try to ensure that each person gets at least one of their wishes fulfilled. 'At the end of each day or the beginning of the next, outline an agenda for the day to help accomplish this goal,' she says. 'It can be difficult with kids, especially when there are big age differences. Parents may want to split up and each take a child or two.' She adds that it's important to be flexible.



Contacts:

Ann Vernon, professor of education and coordinator of the counseling program, (319) 273-2226;

(319) 273-2605 ; ann.Vernon@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, Office of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

July 10, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Mary Byggere, clinical lab technologist at the University of Northern Iowa Student Heath Clinic, has received COLA's Laboratory Excellence Award. The award is given to laboratories that demonstrate exemplary patient testing. This is the second time Byggere has received the award. She has been with the Student Health Clinic for 27 years.

To receive the award, COLA laboratories have to complete an on-site inspection, and be found to have superior laboratory safety and practices for their patients within COLA criteria.

COLA is a non-profit, physician-directed organization that promotes quality and excellence in medicine and patient care through voluntary education, achievement and accreditation programs.

COLA is approved by the federal government and sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association, the American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine, the College of American Pathologists and the American Osteopathic Association.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's College of Natural Sciences recently hosted its 31st annual Chemistry Spring Banquet, recognizing new officers of the American Chemical Society and presenting a series of scholarships and awards.

New ACS officers are Tim Schramm of Dyersville, president; Jeanie Tsamis of Cedar Rapids, vice president; Leah Goepferd of Iowa City, secretary; and Carolyn Carter of Wilton, treasurer.

__(NAME)__ of __(TOWN)__ received the __(AWARD/SCHOLARSHIP NAME)__, for __(DESCRIPTION OF SCHOLARSHIP/AWARD)__.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

July 8, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- John W. Johnson, University of Northern Iowa professor of history, participated last month in the annual reading and scoring of the College Board's APï¾® Examinations in United States History. This is the 13th year Johnson has been selected to serve as a reader.

Around 1.7 million examinations in 19 disciplines were evaluated by more than 6,000 readers from high schools and universities in the United States and around the world. According to the College Board APï¾® Program, these men and women are some of the best high school and college educators in the United States, Canada, and abroad.

'The APï¾® Reading is one of the few settings in which academic dialogue between school and college educators is fostered and strongly encouraged,' said Lee Jones, vice president for K-12 development and operations at the College Board. 'It fosters professionalism, allows for the exchange of ideas and strengthens the commitment to students and to teaching. We are very grateful for the contributions of talented educators like Professor Johnson.'

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa senior Julie Schutte presented her Teacher Work Sample research project to the annual Midwest Association for the Education of Young Children conference in Peoria, Ill. The project was done in collaboration with educators at the Freeburg Center for Early Childhood Education in Waterloo.

Schutte is an elementary teacher education major from Fairbank, Iowa.

July 7, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Sixteen students at the University of Northern Iowa have spent the last two months welcoming entering freshmen, transfer students, and their parents, to UNI's summer orientation.

The students on this year's summer orientation staff were selected based on personality, involvement in campus activities and organizations, academic achievement, knowledge of the university, and sensitivity to the concerns of the new students and their parents.

__(Name)__, of __(Hometown)__ was chosen as a student staff member for UNI's summer orientation. __(He/She)__ is __(biographical information)__.

UNI's Summer Orientation was held in nine sessions during June and July for incoming freshman, and an additional three sessions were held in June for transfer students. About 2,200 freshman students and more than 450 transfer students attended throughout the summer. One last registration session is planned for Aug. 22.

During the orientation sessions, students and parents attended presentations addressing different aspects of college life. Students also met with their academic advisors, registered for fall semester classes and toured the UNI campus. Parents were invited to attend sessions that explained residence hall living, financial aid, academic advising and class scheduling. They also had the opportunity to visit with UNI faculty and tour the campus.



Note: to obtain a list of the summer orientation students, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-277-2761.

July 6, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Sturgis Youth Theatre will present its fourth-annual all-youth summer theatre production, L. Frank Baum's 'The Wizard of Oz,' by Anne Coulter Martens, at the Oster Regent Theatre, July 17 ï¾– 19, at 7 p.m.

Director Gretta Berghammer, Sturgis Youth Theatre artistic director and UNI professor of theatre, chose 'The Wizard of Oz' in celebration of the story's 100th anniversary.

Under the supervision of technical director Chris Blad, costume designer Jade Bettin, and publicist Jascenna Haislet-Carlson, the cast is responsible for the creation of scenery, props, costumes and publicity.

Theatre UNI staff designer Mark A. Parrott designed the scenery for the production. Justin Hossle, a theatre major at UNI, will serve as stage manager and lighting designer.

Founded in 1999, the Sturgis Youth Theatre is a collaborative effort of the Cedar Falls Community Theatre, the Hearst Center for the Arts, and the UNI Department of Theatre. Its mission is to provide quality productions, meaningful production experiences, and varied theatre study opportunities for the youth of Cedar Falls and surrounding communities.

The cast includes nearly 50 children ages seven to 17 from Cedar Falls and Waterloo. Cast members include Carter Allen, Elizabeth Boody, Virginia Boody, Alexandra Bowman, Michael Bowman, Jennifer Camarata, Cheyenne Carter, Manda Colbert, Kieran Cowden, Mackenzie Cowden, Cassandra Crotty, Alexa Deines, Maggie Devine, Elizabeth Dobson, Allison Dryer, Heather Edeker, Abby Engel, Rachel Fritts, Allison Fryman, Lisa Gansen, Danielle Glaspie, Elena Houseal, Hannah Howland, Jennifer Hurban, Savannah Ivey, Jessica Jenkins, Kristine Johanning, Krista Lee, Sam Lilja, Dylan Martin, Riley Martin, Tessa Michaelsen, Thea Moe, Africa O'Nealsisk, Alicia Palas, Hannah Peterson, Sarah Prophet, Felicia Rider, Sara Ross, Sara Roth, Caroline Sell, Sam Steierl, Sara Strever, Amelia Sutton, Ana Tallakson, Ellie Tallakson, Devon Turner, Matthew Vichlach, Lauren Waddle, and Allie Wirth. High school students Kyle Brown, Marta Hetrick, Jason Senchina, and Bethany Palas are working backstage.

Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the Oster Regent box office.

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Home mortgage costs remain low, but buyers should beware

As mortgage rates remain low, many homeowners and first-time buyers are considering selling or refinancing. But Arthur Cox, director of the Real Estate Education Program at the University of Northern Iowa, says buyers and borrowers should be aware of the settlement costs involved, which can drive up effective borrowing costs. All lenders are not required to disclose costs such as yield-spread premiums or back-end points. He says there's no way to predict how long rates will stay at current levels but adds 'they can't stay this way forever.'

Contacts:

Arthur Cox, director, UNI Real Estate Education Program, (319) 273-6986 (office); (319) 273-2929 (department office); Arthur.cox@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761











No fries with that shake, says UNI professor

Fast food restaurants and snack-food manufacturers are scurrying to reduce portion size and fatty content, in the wake of a recent lawsuit filed by a man who said McDonald's was responsible for his obesity. Larry Hensley is a professor in UNI's School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services (HPELS), which recently received a $700,000 grant to study obesity and physical activity in children. He's encouraged by the news that some food makers are beginning to rethink some of their product lines. 'There's a mentality in this country that you have to clean your plate -- if you've got more on your plate to eat then there's a greater likelihood that you will eat more.' Hensley said gimmicks like 'super sizing' tend to disproportionately affect the economically disadvantaged. 'You get more food for a relatively little amount of money, so it seems like a good deal. '

He said, though, that the changes are a 'step in the right direction. But we also need to see a reduction in the foods that are heavily laden with fats and transfats, and we need to see better food options in general.'



Contacts:

Larry Hensley, professor, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, (319) 273-6442, 987-2571, Larry.Hensley@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761









Roadside vegetation program transforms ditches from simple drainage to beautiful scenery

In 1989, the state of Iowa created the Integrated Roadside Vegetation Management (IVRM) program and IRVM office at the University of Northern Iowa. Groundwater protection was the objective. Iowa used to blanket-spray herbicides over most of its 600,000 acres of state and county roadsides each year. The IRVM office works closely with the Iowa Department of Transportation and uses transportation enhancement funds to provide native prairie grass and wildflower seed for roadside plantings in 66 counties. The UNI IRVM office seeks to increase county participation and provides a variety of means of support for counties in the program. Results can be seen in vivid color across the state this time of year. Iowa is recognized nationally as a leader in the use of native plants in roadsides. According to IRVM Manager, Kirk Henderson, 'Iowa's roadside vegetation is preserved, planted, and maintained to be safe, visually interesting, ecologically integrated.'

Contacts:

Kirk Henderson, UNI Roadside Program, Native Roadside Vegetation Center, (319) 273-2813, (319) 273-2238, kirk.henderson@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, Office of Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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Home mortgage costs remain low, but buyers should beware

As mortgage rates remain low, many homeowners and first-time buyers are considering selling or refinancing. But Arthur Cox, director of the Real Estate Education Program at the University of Northern Iowa, says buyers and borrowers should be aware of the settlement costs involved, which can drive up effective borrowing costs. All lenders are not required to disclose costs such as yield-spread premiums or back-end points. He says there's no way to predict how long rates will stay at current levels but adds 'they can't stay this way forever.'

Contacts:

Arthur Cox, director, UNI Real Estate Education Program, (319) 273-6986 (office); (319) 273-2929 (department office); Arthur.cox@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



No fries with that shake, says UNI professor

Fast food restaurants and snack-food manufacturers are scurrying to reduce portion size and fatty content, in the wake of a recent lawsuit filed by a man who said McDonald's was responsible for his obesity. Larry Hensley is a professor in UNI's School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services (HPELS), which recently received a $700,000 grant to study obesity and physical activity in children. He's encouraged by the news that some food makers are beginning to rethink some of their product lines. 'There's a mentality in this country that you have to clean your plate -- if you've got more on your plate to eat then there's a greater likelihood that you will eat more.' Hensley said gimmicks like 'super sizing' tend to disproportionately affect the economically disadvantaged. 'You get more food for a relatively little amount of money, so it seems like a good deal. '

He said, though, that the changes are a 'step in the right direction. But we also need to see a reduction in the foods that are heavily laden with fats and transfats, and we need to see better food options in general.'



Contacts:

Larry Hensley, professor, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, (319) 273-6442, 987-2571, Larry.Hensley@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Roadside vegetation program transforms ditches from simple drainage to beautiful scenery

In 1989, the state of Iowa created the Integrated Roadside Vegetation Management (IVRM) program and IRVM office at the University of Northern Iowa. Groundwater protection was the objective. Iowa used to blanket-spray herbicides over most of its 600,000 acres of state and county roadsides each year. The IRVM office works closely with the Iowa Department of Transportation and uses transportation enhancement funds to provide native prairie grass and wildflower seed for roadside plantings in 66 counties. The UNI IRVM office seeks to increase county participation and provides a variety of means of support for counties in the program. Results can be seen in vivid color across the state this time of year. Iowa is recognized nationally as a leader in the use of native plants in roadsides. According to IRVM Manager, Kirk Henderson, 'Iowa's roadside vegetation is preserved, planted, and maintained to be safe, visually interesting, ecologically integrated.'

Contacts:

Kirk Henderson, UNI Roadside Program, Native Roadside Vegetation Center, (319) 273-2813, (319) 273-2238, kirk.henderson@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, Office of Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

July 1, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa --The University of Northern Iowa's John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center (JPEC) and the Iowa Federal and State Partnership will present a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) workshop in the UNI Commons Ballroom from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 5; and 8:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 6.



The SBIR program provides qualified small businesses an opportunity to propose innovative research and development projects that meet specific federal needs. Ten federal agencies have $1.6 billion available to help small businesses bring new products, technologies and services to the marketplace. Cost is $35, and deadline for registration is July 23.

For more information or to register, contact the JPEC at (319) 273-7350 or visit the Web site at www.jpec.org/sbir.htm.

June 29, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Department of Theatre recently awarded scholarships to several incoming students, all planning to major in theatre. Students qualified for the awards by performing two-minute monologues and interviewing, or presenting their design and production portfolios and interviewing. Also considered were letters of recommendation and high school transcripts.

(NAME) of (HOMETOWN) received a (AMOUNT) scholarship.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations 319-273-2761.

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Tips for keeping active kids safe during hot weather

Summer days mean sports camps, baseball, softball, basketball and a host of other outdoor activities for kids. Summer days also mean high temperatures and high humidity -- a potentially deadly combination. Biff Williams, chair of the UNI Division of Athletic Training, has tips on what kids should eat and drink before, during and after outdoor activities. Williams is one of the professors associated with the famous pickle juice research that has influenced how NFL teams treat heat stress among their athletes.

Contacts:

Biff Williams, chair, UNI Division of athletic training (319) 273-6824, (319) 287-3232, biff.williams@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Tight market may lead job seekers to alternate careers

The slowing economy has resulted in the tightest job market in 40 years. But Susie Schwieger, associate director of The Career Center at UNI, says job seekers in this tight market should consider veering off the beaten path to find a new position. 'If you've been laid off, this might be the right time to sit back and reevaluate your skills, and think about what other positions you might be qualified for,' she says. 'For instance, teachers who have been laid off have instructional skills and training that might make them good candidates for jobs in the training department of an organization.'

She noted too, that job seekers shouldn't put all their energy into one job search strategy. 'They need to realize that they need a 'tool box' of strategies in order to be effective in the job search.'

Contacts:

Susie Schwieger, associate director, The Career Center, (319) 273-6857, Susie.schwieger@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing and Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



Buying local produce benefits the environment, diet and economy

The average food item travels 1,300 miles from the farm to your table. Kamyar Enshayan, program manager at UNI's Center for Energy and Environmental Education, says a new program, 'Buy Fresh, Buy Local,' will help Cedar Valley citizens buy food that's been grown closer to home, and with fewer chemicals, pesticides, hormones and genetically modified seeds.

'Buying local means investing our food dollars in local independent farm families who grow the food we eat,' said Kamyar Enshayan. If half of the 50,000 households of Black Hawk County spent $10 a week on locally grown produce, that would mean $1 million invested locally every month.'

Contact:

Kamyar Enshayan, program manager, UNI Center for Energy and Environmental Education and campaign organizer for 'Buy Fresh, Buy Local, (319) 273-7575, kamyar.enshayan@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

June 26, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa is offering a presentation for community organizations called 'Community Builders.'

The 20-minute presentation given by UNI President Robert Koob, or other UNI faculty and staff, focuses on the importance of higher education in contributing to Iowa's economy. It covers community leadership and the responsibility Iowans have in shaping the state's future.

The presentation also highlights ways in which college graduates contribute to the financial, social, and political wealth of Iowa's communities. The relationship between attitudes and education will be discussed along with information on workforce statistics, benefits of an educated workforce, wealth creation, and current legislative issues affecting colleges and universities.

For more information about this or other presentations offered by UNI, contact Stacey Christensen, community relations manager, University Marketing & Public Relations at (319) 273-3170.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Twenty Provost Scholars, each receiving a one-year tuition and fee scholarship, renewable for four years, have been named as part of the Presidential Scholars program at the University of Northern Iowa. The scholars will begin their studies this fall.

__(Name)__ of __(Hometown)__, is among the students receiving Provost awards.

The awardees receive stipends that cover UNI tuition and mandatory health, student activities and computer fees. They are valued at $4,916 for Iowa residents and $11,874 for out-of-state students for the 2003-2004 academic year. The scholarships will be adjusted to cover any rise in tuition and fees.

To be eligible for the awards, students have to score at least a 29 on the American College Testing (ACT) exam and be in the top 10 percent of their high school classes. Students in classes with fewer than 50 students must be one of the top five in their classes.

High school juniors interested in being considered for these awards in the fall of 2004 need to ensure their ACT scores arrive in Northern Iowa's Admissions Office by Oct. 1, 2003.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

June 25, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A University of Northern Iowa professor was honored by the Environmental Studies Board of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, D.C., June 19.

William Stigliani, director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Education and interim director of Environmental Programs at UNI, was invited to the reception and dinner celebrating the 20th anniversary of the NAS's 1983 book 'Risk Assessment in the Federal Government: Managing the Process.' Christine Whitman, head of the Environmental Protection Agency, was the featured speaker at the event.

Stigliani was one of three staff officers for the publication, which the Academy described as 'the seminal work that became a foundation of theory and practice in the field of risk assessment.' The staff officers sought out and organized a committee of 14 experts in the field, who spent two years determining the best ways to standardize risk assessment. This team conducted meetings, compiled, analyzed and reviewed the findings, and wrote the final report.

Stigliani, who was an NAS staff officer from 1981 to 1986, was surprised at the honor because normally the NAS does not commemorate reports. The Academy, established by President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War, is a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization whose main purpose is to resolve scientific conflicts that have important policy implications at the regional and national level.

Before coming to UNI in 1994, Stigliani, a chemist by training, was with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria, where he led several regional- and continental-scale environmental research projects.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Association of Educational Office Personnel (AEOP) recently installed Judy Dieken, clerk III in Human Resource Services, as president.

Other officers are Carolina Wilson, secretary II, School of Music, president-elect; Dianna Jones, secretary II, Student Services, secretary; Michele Mullings-Shand, assistant administrator, Grants and Contracts, treasurer; and Karen Williams, secretary II, Price Lab School, past-president/historian.

The organization also chose Donna Uhlenhopp, office coordinator I, Communication Studies, as professional of the year. Administrator of the year was Gary Shontz, UNI controller.

June 24, 2003 - 7:00pm

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The advent of television changed American politics forever, allowing politicians expanded access to their constituents, and giving Americans opportunity to view their candidates in action. Chris Martin, associate professor of communication studies at UNI, thinks the Internet may create the next big change in politics.

He cites MoveOn.org, a Web site set up by progressive Democrats that is hosting its own Democratic primary. The site claims a base of more than 2 million people; even more may vote in the primary. The results will be announced on Friday, June 27. 'It's good for democracy in that it allows regular people to have a voice in the primary selection process. Increasingly, the regular primary process is influenced by early polling and the candidates who have the most money and can advertise. MoveOn.org's process is not influenced by those factors.'

Martin said it's hard to ignore the site's success. 'They've been very effective in bringing petitions to the White House and to members of Congress. But what really makes politicians pay attention to MoveOn.org is that its organizers have raised about $3.5 million through the MoveOn Political Action Committee.'

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Participants in UNI's first-ever junior band camp will perform from 1:30 to 2:15 p.m. on Friday, June 27, in the Overman Park band shell. The 65 middle-school students from across the state will be conducted by Marguerite Wilder, who has conducted honor bands throughout the United States, Canada, England, Italy, Turkey and Australia.

The performance is part of the annual Sturgis Falls celebration, and is free and open to the public.

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Creating Web Pages'

Students in the ECHOES (Every Child Has the Opportunity to Excel and Succeed) program that serves sixth-through ninth-grade students in the Waterloo and Cedar Falls Community School Districts, are completing a workshop, 'Creating Web Pages.' They will meet from 9:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., in Lang Hall, Room 245.

The workshop, offered by ITS-Educational Technology at UNI, has taught students how to use an HTML (HyperText Markup Language) editor to create a Web page and how to add graphics and work with digital cameras. They also learned about safety on the World Wide Web. The students will fine-tune their pages and sharing them with the class during Thursday's session.

Instructors are Jason Vetter and Lori Seawel, educational technology specialists at UNI, and Angela Meyers, a graduate assistant.







Junior Band Camp

Some 65 middle school musicians from across the state are on campus through Friday. They have been learning about conducting, sight-reading, percussion ensembles, brass and woodwind choirs and music composing, as well as performing as a mass band. The workshop is designed for students with limited marching band experience.

The workshop will conclude with a performance in the Overman Park Band Shell, from 1:30 to 2:15 p.m., Friday, June 27, as part of the Sturgis Falls celebration. There is a visual opportunity from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Thursday, June 26, as the band rehearses in Davis Hall.

The event is sponsored by the UNI School of Music.



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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Resident assistants and community advisers have been named at the University of Northern Iowa for the 2003-2004 academic year.

___(Name)___ of ___(Hometown)___, a ___(classification)___majoring in ___(major)___, is one of approximately 85 resident assistants (RAs) in the UNI Department of Residence. Those serving in ROTH (Residence on the Hill) are known as CAs, or community advisers.

RAs serve as student advisers to approximately 40 students in a residence hall, providing assistance with personal, interpersonal and academic concerns. The RAs also support residents in the development of a cohesive living and learning group.

RAs are certified in first aid and CPR, receive extensive training in conflict mediation and are the university's contact for students in the residence halls. In addition, they plan and present educational programs, offer planned and spontaneous social activities and provide academic support for students.

'RAs are vital to the success of the University of Northern Iowa residence system. They provide models for leadership while maintaining high academic standards,' said Lyn Redington, associate director of the Department of Residence/Housing.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

June 23, 2003 - 7:00pm

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The Supreme Court ruled Monday morning that, while it is still in the country's best interest to adhere to affirmative action policies, the system used at the University of Michigan is unconstitutional.

'Because the court didn't really give any practical suggestions for how best to use affirmative action in admissions policies, the stage is set for more lawsuits,' says Michael Blackwell, director of multicultural education at UNI. 'But I do look upon the court's decision as a victory. The decision supports affirmative action, endorses it, and says affirmative action needs to be taken to address and redress gross inequities due to past discrimination of people of color.'

Blackwell says he would likely have participated in protests had the court ruled against affirmative action policies in general. 'I believe there is value in having a culturally diverse environment. Students of color need to see others like themselves on campus and be able to communicate with people like themselves. It benefits the majority population because they need to be exposed to different cultures; it broadens perspectives and deepens insight about society at large.'

June 18, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A new class of Presidential Scholars will begin its studies on the University of Northern Iowa campus this fall.

____(Name)____ of ___(Address / Hometown)___ is among the 12 students to receive the four-year, full-ride scholarships. They are funded through the Office of the President at UNI. The awards, which provide free tuition, room and board, and mandatory fees for health, student services and computer, are valued at $9,846 for Iowa residents and $16,804 for out-of-state students for the 2003-2004 academic year. The students must maintain the academic excellence for which the awards have been granted.

The select group will take part in scholars-only seminars, be eligible for special travel/study opportunities and receive extensive individual advising. All will be required to complete a senior thesis or project.

UNI President Robert Koob said, 'The University of Northern Iowa's Presidential Scholars program accords to students of exceptional academic performance the same recognition and financial aid benefits that universities have long accorded to students of exceptional athletic ability. The program represents a deep commitment to academic excellence at the University.'

Members of the Presidential Scholars Board are: Betty DeBerg, chair, professor and head, Department of Philosophy and Religion; Beverly Kopper, professor of psychology; Ira Simet, associate professor of chemistry; Robert Seager, professor of biology; Kathy Oakland, instructor in teaching; Jeffrey Byrd, professor of art; and Philip Patton, UNI Registrar.



Students who are in the top 10 percent of their high school class and who scored a 29 or higher on the ACT test are eligible to apply. Those in classes consisting of fewer than 50 people must be one of the top five in their class. High school seniors interested in being considered for this award in the fall of 2004 need to be sure their applications are postmarked no later than Oct. 1.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

June 16, 2003 - 7:00pm

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The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, will meet Wednesday and Thursday, June 18 and 19 at the Iowa School for the Deaf, in the Lied Multipurpose Complex. Several issues pertaining to the University of Northern Iowa will be on the docket.

P&S Salary Policies for fiscal year 2004

Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2566

UNI preliminary fiscal year 2004 general fund budget

Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2566

Athletics preliminary fiscal year 2004 general fund budget

Rick Hartzell, director of athletics, (319) 273-2470

Institutional agreements, leases and easements

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance, (319) 273-2382

Fiscal year 2004 capital improvement plans

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance, (319) 273-2382

Capital register

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance, (319) 273-2382

June 11, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Three seniors and a recent graduate of the University of Northern Iowa's electrical and information technology program will be competing later this month in the 10th Annual World Championship Solar Electric Boat Regatta in Buffalo, N.Y.

UNI e-Boat team members are Chad Clark of Cedar Rapids, Dan Frisch of Waterloo, Aaron Mitchell of Manchester and May graduate Derek Paulus of Rockford. Their adviser is Recayi Pecen, UNI assistant professor of industrial technology and program coordinator for their major, Iowa's first four-year engineering technology major in the electrical and electronics area. They are working on daily test and performance drives on the lake at George Wyth State Park through Sunday, June 15.

This is the second year UNI has entered the competition. The foursome began modifications last fall on the 110-pound fiberglass solar electric boat created by last year's team. Changes include two new electric motors, two new controllers, enhanced electrical wiring, a better cockpit control area and one new solar panel.

The UNI solar electric boat team will leave Tuesday, June 17 for the world championship of solar electric boating that runs Wednesday, June 18, through Sunday, June 22. More than two dozen schools have entered the competition, including the U.S. Naval Academy, Milwaukee School of Engineering and Rice University. They will compete in slalom, sprint and endurance races using either direct solar energy or solar energy stored in electric batteries.

Pecen said UNI's zero-emission solar boat promotes eco-friendly boat technologies on Iowa lakes and rivers. He said studies show a considerable amount of oil and gas leaks and run-offs into the water from internal combustion boat motors. He added that 'solar powered zero emission boats may help Iowa lakes and rivers in the near future until hydrogen fuel cell motors become commercially available almost everywhere.'

Pecen said worldwide, 236,000 metric tons of oil and oil products are leaked into the water through boats, 'more than seven times the amount spilled by the Exxon Valdez in Alaska in 1989.'

The project has been funded for a three-year period by a $15,000 grant from the Iowa Energy Center. Sponsors for the UNI solar electric boat include Blain's Farm and Fleet, John Deere Product Engineering Center, Iowa Energy Center, Optima Batteries, Rockwell Collins, WBM Marine and UNI.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Following a semester of extensive reading, seven University of Northern Iowa science students are conducting summer research projects, five on-campus and two off-campus.

The on-campus students-- Jacob Becker of Spencer, Sherrie Renee Elzey of Sully, Jeff Fisher of Cedar Falls, Michelle Healy of Muscatine and Jason McIntosh of Honey Creek-- are particicpating in the Merck/AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) Undergraduate Science Research Program, which promotes interdisciplinary research among undergraduates in the natural sciences.

Becker, a son of Margaret Becker, will research the effects of Atrazine and its metabolites on human cell growth from pesticide-contaminated Iowa water resources. He is a senior biology/biomedical major.

Elzey, a daughter of Paul and Ruth Elzey, will work on fabrication and characterization of nonlinear photorefractive holographic film. She is a senior with a double major in chemistry and physics.

Fisher, a senior environmental geography major, is a son of Mary Fisher. His project involves predicting high mosquito densities using global positioning systems.

Healy, a daughter of Liam and Kathy Healy, is a senior biology major. She will study the effects of an extract from the eastern cedar, Juniperus virginiana, on cancer cell growth and motility.

A senior chemistry major, and the son of Cathy Gallentine, McIntosh will research microelectronics of phospholipid bilayers in aqueous solutions.

The program is funded by the Merck Company Foundation, a private, charitable foundation established by Merck & Co., a pharmaceutical manufacturer, and administered by the AAAS, the world's largest federation of scientific and engineering societies.

The off-campus students are Jessica Ball of Mount Pleasant, and Libby K. Long of Altoona, both junior biology majors. Ball will do research at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha on the function of homeobox genes in skeletal and neural tube development. Long will work at the Des Moines University School of Osteopathic Medicine, and participate in a clinical study of the postprandial kinetics of insulin, glucagon and cholecytokinin.

In August, all of the students will present their findings at a poster session that will feature a talk by a University of Texas medical researcher on the discovery of how cholera is transmitted.

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