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September 14, 2003 - 7:00pm

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On anniversary of food stamps, UNI professor lauds the program



In September 1959, Congress passed a bill authorizing food stamps for low-income Americans. The author of 'Who Speaks For the Poor,' Al Hays is director of UNI's Master of Public Policy program. He says food stamps, although often the object of contempt by middle-and upper-class America, work. 'There's an anti-poor, anti-government-program climate in this country right now, and it's become a totally irrational matter of ideology, rather than any real clear-headed analysis of what programs do or don't do. Food stamps have been effective, and they've done what they are supposed to do -- and that's reduce hunger.'

In fact, says Hays, one of the reasons food stamps have been exempt from the budget slashes experienced by other government programs is food stamps are highly effective. 'It's a fundamental safety net, not for people just sitting around home, picking up a check, but for those who are working hard every single day, and still don't earn enough to support their families.'

Contact:

Al Hays, director, Master of Public Policy program, (319) 273-2910, 266-8406, Allen.Hays@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Marathon running good preparation for life



Marathons are 26 miles by tradition, because they are modeled after a 26-mile run by Athenian Phidippides in 490 B.C., who ran from Marathon to Sparta during the Persian Wars, seeking help in holding back the Persian army. Forrest Dolgener, professor in the UNI School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, has run eight marathons, and understands well the draw. 'It's the challenge,' says the professor who once taught a wildly popular marathon-running course at UNI. 'The question really is, 'Can I run it?' That becomes a challenge. People do it because it's there and they haven't done it and they want to know if they can.'

Dolgener says the intense preparation -- both physical and mental -- necessary for running a marathon also is good training for life's challenges. 'People who took the marathon course have came back years afterward and told me the experience was a tremendous asset in their jobs. They learned perseverance and commitment, and how to get something done when you don't really want to do it. It's a major life lesson.'

Contact:

Forrest Dolgener, professor of physical education, (319) 273-6479, 277-5110, Forrest.Dolgener@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





True 'free time' almost non-existent, says UNI professor

Technology has produced the likes of the cell phone, the fax and the laptop, making constant communication more convenient. Those same inventions, however, also have made it easier for today's worker to stay in touch with his work. The result, says Brian Roberts, assistant professor of history at UNI, is a nation where the distinction between work and leisure has broken down. 'It's really created a situation where, before they even know it, even if they aren't workaholics, people are working pretty much all the time. There is never a point anymore where a person can say, 'I'm outside of the workplace.''

That also increases what Roberts refers to as 'dread time' and procrastination. 'Because there's no space they can call 'outside of work,' many people, particularly those in white-collar jobs, are always thinking about what they need to finish, or thinking about getting back to work. It's hard to say you get any real free leisure time.'

Contact:

Brian Roberts, assistant professor of history, (319) 273-3161, Brian.Robertsd@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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Board of Regents to meet at ISU

The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, will meet Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 16 and 17 at Iowa State University, in Ames. Several issues pertaining to UNI will be on the docket. These items are scheduled to be discussed on Wednesday. Specific times are unknown.

1. Annual institutional reports on Academic Program Review -- To be discussed by Aaron Podolefsky, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs. Background materials will be provided at the meeting.

Highlights:

a) UNI accounting program

- UNI is No. 1 in the nation for first-time pass rate on the CPA exam -- 56.4 percent (source: National Assoc. of State Boards of Accountancy)

- Fall 2002 -- 674 accounting majors enrolled

- Accounting is the third-largest major at UNI

Contact:

Gerald Smith, head, Department of Accounting, (319) 273-6345



b) UNI Office of Student Field Experience (OFSE) -- student teaching

- UNI's program is viewed as one of the best in the nation

- UNI contracts with 217 school districts and private schools in Iowa to place approximately 700 student teachers annually

- UNI uses tenured faculty as field supervisors -- very few teacher preparation programs use this approach

Contact:

Roger Kueter, head, Department of Teaching; and director, Office of Student Field Experience, (319) 273-2203

2. Annual study on tuition policies and rates

- In 2002, the Board of Regents directed its universities to separate student fees from tuition

- Most of UNI's student fees will increase slightly, based on inflation

- UNI's student government (NISG) supports this approach

- A byproduct of this process has been the 'Panther Pass,' which gives students increased access to campus events

Contact:

Renee Romano, vice president for Educational & Student Services, (319) 273-2331

3. Annual investment and cash management report

Contact:

Gary Shontz, controller, (319) 273-3576

4. Annual energy conservation report

- UNI is know for its approach to energy conservation

- The UNI Physical Plant, in cooperation with the Center for Energy and Environmental Education (CEEE) has undertaken a new project to find ways to help UNI save energy and money

- Highlights of other research being done:

1. Computer electricity use study by college

2. Monitoring electricity used by lights in the UNI-Dome and Lang Hall

3. Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center -- identified $2,500 annual savings just for lobby lights

4. Testing new showerheads in the Wellness/Recreation Center

Contact:

Kamyar Enshayan, CEEE, (319) 273-7575

5. Final requests for operating and capital appropriations

- Physics building renovation -- 1906 building, last updated in 1930s. Needs renovation to bring it up to par with 21st century

- Physics is one of UNI's fastest growing areas of study, including cutting-edge undergraduate courses such as nanoscience and materials science

- Electrical distribution system -- upgrade to meet current and future needs

Contacts:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

Cliff Chancy, head, Department of Physics, (319) 273-2420

6. Annual five-year capital program

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

7. Annual report on phased and early retirement programs

- The current Early Retirement Incentive plan is only open to faculty and staff who were eligible on June 30, 2002. These people will have until June 30, 2004 to retire.

- 24 UNI faculty and staff members retired in fiscal year 2003 under the Early Retirement Incentive plan.

- There are no current proposals for a new incentive plan.

- 20 UNI faculty and staff retired without the incentive plan.

- One faculty member elected to begin phased retirement in fiscal year 2003. A total of 13 faculty and staff will begin phased retirement in fiscal year 2004.

Contact:

Jan Flick, benefits manager, Office of Human Resource Services, (319) 273-2824

8. Annual report of registrars and admissions officers

Contact:

Philip Patton, registrar, (319) 273-2283

9. Center for International Peace and Security Studies

- The center would be housed in the Department of Political Science, in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

- One of its goals -- foster the development of academic experiences and internships for students in the areas of international peace and security studies

Contact:

Phil Mauceri, associate professor of political science, (319) 273-2039

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UNI reaches enrollment goal, sets graduation record

The University of Northern Iowa today announced its fall 2003 enrollment figures. UNI's fall enrollment stands at 13,441 students, close to its target enrollment of 13,400 students. According to UNI President Robert Koob, this enrollment is part of a planned effort to maintain quality while addressing state budget cuts.

'Two years ago we began a concerted effort to reduce the size of the university,' said Koob. 'Our goal was to match enrollment to the available budget. In 2003, UNI graduated 3,016 students, our largest class ever. Coupled with that, our average time-to-graduation rate is under four-and-a-half years. This is a real success story.'

'U.S. News & World Report' recently ranked UNI No. 2 on its list of top public Midwest regional master's universities for the seventh year in a row. According to Koob, UNI is offering almost 200 more class sections than it did in 1998, which was one of the largest enrollment years prior to recent budget cuts; and average class size is down to 26.8 students.

UNI managed its enrollment through changes in three primary areas:

1. Graduation requirements -- UNI lowered the total number of credits necessary to graduate

2. Upper-division classes -- Changes were made to help ensure that juniors and seniors have access to the upper-division classes they need to graduate

Contact:

Aaron Podolefsky, provost and vice president for academic affairs, (319) 273-2517, aaron.podolefsky@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

3. Suspension policy -- UNI tightened its suspension policy

Contact:

Philip Patton, registrar, (319) 273-2283, philip.patton@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

Patton also can address the average time-to-graduation rate.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa today announced its fall 2003 enrollment figures. UNI's fall enrollment stands at 13,441 students, close to its target enrollment of 13,400 students.

According to UNI President Robert Koob, this enrollment is part of a planned effort to maintain quality while addressing state budget cuts.

'Two years ago we began a concerted effort to reduce the size of the university,' said Koob. 'Our goal was to match enrollment to the available budget. In 2003, UNI graduated 3,016 students, our largest class ever. Coupled with that, our average time-to-graduation rate is under four-and-a-half years. This is a real success story.'

He noted that 'U.S. News & World Report' recently ranked UNI No. 2 on its list of top public Midwest regional master's universities for the seventh year in a row.

According to Koob, UNI is offering almost 200 more class sections than it did in 1998, which was one of the largest enrollment years prior to recent budget cuts; and average class size is down to 26.8 students.

'This is where we need to be short-term,' said Koob. 'We keep students first by focusing on our core mission -- teaching students. But long-term, we are still facing a budget deficit. Reduced state support threatens faculty recruitment, building maintenance and outreach services to Iowa.'

According to UNI Registrar Philip Patton, among specific enrollment categories for fall 2003, total minority enrollment stands at 6.0 percent, up from 5.5 percent from last year. Foreign-student enrollment is up by 4.9 percent and total graduate student enrollment is up by 1.4 percent.

September 11, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A community-wide energy efficiency campaign developed by the University of Northern Iowa's Center for Energy and Environmental Education (CEEE), received unanimous support from the Committee on Community Relations and Planning of the Cedar Falls City Council late last month, for a $30,000 grant. The grant must now be approved by the full council.

Cedar Falls Mayor Jon Crews presented the program to the committee. The campaign will target citizens on fixed incomes, such as the elderly, with the goal of upgrading energy efficiency in at least 200 homes and lowering energy costs by $100 or more per home.

'The program is particularly critical for this winter,' said Pat Higby, energy educator at the CEEE, who will coordinate the project. 'The price of natural gas is expected to increase dramatically due to demand outpacing supply.'

Higby will work with 10 local churches to send parishioners who have volunteered to visit the homes. 'The advantage of working with churches is that the clients are much more likely to let a fellow parishioner into their home than a stranger,' said Higby.

The volunteers, who will be trained by Cedar Falls Utilities, will have a list of items to check as possible sources of energy loss. They will then make energy efficiency improvements, such as caulking leaks, adding weather stripping to doors and lowering the temperature on the hot water heater. Energy costs before and after improvements will be compared to gauge the effectiveness of the campaign.

'Many people know they should make improvements,' said Higby, 'but very few actually take the final step and do it. The funding from the city allows us to get this program underway, providing these residents with ongoing savings in successive years. A payback time on these improvements of one-and-one-half years is a really good investment.'

The project will begin in September and continue through the winter of 2003-04. For additional information, contact Pat Higby, (319) 273-6012, or higby@uni.edu.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa - - The University of Northern Iowa will host a town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 2, in the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center's Jebe Hall, to discuss recent budget cuts and tuition increases.

UNI President Robert Koob will discuss the benefits UNI offers the community. Keith Saunders, associate director of governmental relations at UNI, will present 'Iowa's Students are Its Future: Why It's Everyone's Business.' Current students will be available to talk about their experiences at UNI.

The event is free and open to the public. Those planning to attend should RSVP to Stacey Christensen by Friday, Sept. 26, at (319) 273-3170.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Microsoft Outlook - E-mail Strategies,' a course to help participants manage e-mail accounts, transition from Web-based e-mail and Outlook Express and simplify communication with business contacts, friends and family, will be offered by the University of Northern Iowa Regional Business Center (RBC), in partnership with Ketels Contract Training.

The course will be held from 8:30 a.m.-noon, on Tuesday, Sept. 30, at the RBC office, 212 E. Fourth St., Waterloo, and will be taught by Chris McGregor-Case. The course will focus exclusively on Outlook's e-mail features.

A second Outlook course will be offered from 8:30 a.m.- noon, Thursday, Nov. 13. 'Microsoft Outlook - It Does More Than E-mail?,' will take a deeper look at Outlook as a complete personal information management system. Case also will teach this course.

Participants can take one course for $119, or both for $199. The registration deadline for the first course is Friday, Sept. 26. For more information, contact the UNI RBC at (319) 236-8123, or visit www.unirbc.org.

September 10, 2003 - 7:00pm

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UNI College of Education receives approval with selected conditions for educational leadership program for principals

The State Board of Education today gave four major university-based educational leadership programs approval to continue offering their master's-level administrator preparation programs. Three of these, including the University of Northern Iowa, received approval with selected conditions to be met by May 2004. UNI will submit the additional documentation to complete the approval process.

According to Jeffrey Cornett, dean of UNI's College of Education, the board's report cited UNI for several program strengths. 'UNI has one of the most respected educational leadership programs in the state, and the country,' said Cornett. 'We're currently are educating more than 150 future principals in five statewide cohorts.'

Details about the UNI college of education and its educational leadership program:

1) UNI's College of Education (COE) is home to one of the nation's best-known teacher preparation programs

2) UNI is currently educating more than 150 future principals in five statewide cohorts. It also has two cohorts for future superintendents.

3) The COE uses high-tech means to reach students across the state who can't easily travel to UNI for classes

- The COE uses the ICN, supported by WebCT, to educate education administrators in all 99 counties in the state

- The COE provides a specialized preparation program for principals located in the eight largest Iowa school districts

4) The COE has a network of more than 200 practicing administrators who serve as field mentors for UNI students

5) The COE currently provides professional development opportunities to 97 percent of Iowa superintendents through the Iowa Superintendent Finance and Leadership Consortium

For more information about the UNI Administrator Preparation program, visit www.uni.edu/coe/elcpe

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Members of the University of Northern Iowa spirit squad, which consists of UNI's cheer squad, dance team and mascots, recently won several awards at the Universal Cheer and Dance Association (UCA/UDA) College Spirit Camp and competition at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

The cheer squad was awarded first place in the fight song competition, first place in the cheer competition, second in the sideline chant, and the leadership award and game day tradition award for innovative and spirited game day agendas.

The UNI dance team won second place in the fight song competition, third place in the home routine competition and an overall superior rating trophy for the week.

The UNI spirit squad is a member of the UNI Athletic Department and performs at all football, wrestling, volleyball, and men's and women's basketball events.

Members of the (UNI dance team / cheer squad ) include (Name) a (Classification) from (Hometown).

The UNI spirit squads are advised by Shandon Dohmen. The UNI dance team is coached by Jori Wade-Booth. For more information visit www.unipanthers.com/spirit.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Theatre UNI's Off-Hudson Series of Staged Reading begins this season with 'Our Lady of 121st Street,' by Stephen Adly Guirgis, at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 16, in the Communication Arts Center, Room 108 on the UNI campus.

A dark comedy, 'Our Lady of 121st Street' tells the story of a group of old friends reuniting for the funeral of their former teacher, a nun, whose body is stolen on the eve of the wake.

The series will continue Tuesday, Oct. 21, with 'The House of Bernarda Alba,' by Federico Garcia Lorca.

The performance is free. For more information, visit www.uni.edu/theatre, or call the Strayer-Wood Box Office at (319) 273-6381.

September 9, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A documentary depicting the unfolding tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001 and its effects on the New York community will open this year's 'Reel to Real' film series Wednesday, Sept. 17, in the University of Northern Iowa's Maucker Union.

'71 West Broadway, Ground Zero, NY,' will be shown from noon to 1 p.m., in the Maucker Union South Room. A discussion following the film will be facilitated by Guy Sims, Maucker Union associate director.

Sims said the film is part of the year-long 'Reel to Real' film series that presents short films worthy of reflection, discussion, challenge and criticism. The series is sponsored by the Maucker Union Student Activities office and will continue Oct. 15, with 'One + One,' an examination of gay and straight relationships.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information contact Guy Sims at(319) 273-2683.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Northern Iowa Children's Choir is now scheduling auditions. The choir is made up of Iowa students in third through seventh grade, and performs at functions across the state, including concerts in May and December and a performance with the Waterloo/Cedar Falls Symphony Orchestra. Auditions will continue through Sept. 20.

To schedule an audition, contact Michelle Swanson, director, at (319) 273-2600 or michelle.swanson@uni.edu; or visit the Web site at www.pls.uni.edu/swanson/nicc.html.

Swanson teaches music at Malcolm Price Laboratory School, and also teaches music courses at UNI. She holds both a B.M.E and an M.M. from UNI.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Students at the University of Northern Iowa will observe the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks at 9:11 a.m., at the Campanile, on Thursday, Sept. 11.

Marie Hamer, the senior who organized the event, explained, 'It is a moment of silent prayer and reflection to remember all those who lost their lives in the tragedy two years ago.' She said the event is part of a national project, '9/11: Never Forget Project,' initiated by the Young America's Foundation.

September 8, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The National Center for Public and Private School Foundations (NCPPSF) at the University of Northern Iowa will host a conference, 'Issues Involved in the Establishment and Sustainability of School Foundations,' from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 13, at the Des Moines Airport Holiday Inn. The event is designed for public and private school administrators, teachers, K-12 foundation boards of directors, and community members.

'Schools across the country are increasingly looking to school foundations to assist in meeting the growing demands of education and supporting students who want to pursue postsecondary education,' said David Else, director of the NCPPSF, and associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling and Postsecondary Education.

There is no charge to attend. According to Else, all costs, including meals, will be covered through a grant initiated by Sen. Charles Grassley. To register, go to the center's Web site, www.foundationsK12.coe.uni.edu/, and click on 'conferences.' Schools with foundations may participate in a survey at the same site; click on 'foundations survey.' Registration deadline is Oct. 1.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Women on Fridays,' begun last year by the University of Northern Iowa Women's Studies Program, will continue this year with a new twist-- 'Video Viewpoints,' beginning with the video and discussion of 'Sun, Moon and Feather,' at noon Friday, Sept. 12.

In the video, to be shown in Room 161Baker Hall, the three sisters of Spiderwoman Theater tell about growing up Native American in Brooklyn and negotiating two very different worlds. The informal session is free and open to the public. Participants are invited to bring their lunch and dessert will be provided.

'The Women's Studies Program sees this series as an opportunity to contribute to the programming of the university and to our overall goals supporting diversity,' said Cynthia Goatley, director of UNI's Graduate Program in Women's Studies. 'This monthly video series will offer new and provocative perspectives on gender and sexuality, as well as this look at Native American culture.'

The three sisters, Muriel Miguel, Gloria Miguel, and Lisa Mayo, organized the Spiderwoman Theater Workshop in 1975, based upon the Hopi goddess, Spiderwoman. They weave together stories, images, songs, poems, experiences, feelings, music, spaces and bodies in their performances.

Goatley said the troupe performed live at UNI several years ago as part of the Artists Series. They are opening the Women on Fridays series in support of the first UNI Native American Cultural Fair/PowWow, to be held on campus Sept. 26 and 27.

The next presentation in the Friday series will be Oct. 17, 'You Don't Know Dick: The Courageous Hearts of Transsexual Men,' that will explore the stories of six female-to-male transsexuals.

For more information, contact the Women's Studies Program office at (319) 273-7102.

September 7, 2003 - 7:00pm

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Complete information necessary for accurate answers to tax questions

Posing as taxpayers and phoning IRS help-lines, Treasury Department workers recently determined that nearly half the answers given by IRS workers are incorrect or incomplete. The IRS disputes the study, and Marty Wartick, associate professor of accounting at UNI, also is skeptical. She says a telephone call may not be the best way to seek help. 'One thing that's unique about tax preparation is that the omission of a single fact, or the changing of a single fact, might change the correct answer. Any tax question depends on the facts, and it's difficult to get all those facts by phone.' For example, she notes, the answer to a question about claiming a college student child as a dependent can change depending upon how many hours the student is taking.

Wartick suggests taxpayers seeking answers to tax questions first log on to the IRS Web site, www.irs.gov, which features publications, frequently asked questions, and even interactive chats. 'Sometimes, just getting a bigger picture of your own question can help someone else answer it for you,' explains Wartick, who has trained UNI accounting students to work in the university's Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. VITA provides free tax assistance to low- and moderate-income individuals.

Contact

Marty Wartick, associate professor of accounting, (319) 273-7754, 266-2799, Marty.Wartick@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Legacy of Miss America Pageant isn't beauty and perfection



Seventy-two years ago this month, this country crowned its very first Miss America. Diane Depken, associate professor in the UNI School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, says pageants like this one emphasize thinness and physical beauty, and thereby reinforce unrealistic and unhealthy goals for young women. And that can contribute to depression and eating disorders in young girls. Depken says mothers and other role models can help by examining their own body issues. 'We should look at the things we were told growing up. That will help us to not pass those things to our daughters. Even in the academy, I hear adult women talking about dieting and hating parts of their bodies. We can't get rid of that judgment, but we can reject reinforcing it, and we can stop saying it.'

She says other ways to help include teaching girls to critique media messages, and emphasizing body efficacy versus body attractiveness.

Contact:

Diane Depken, associate professor, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, (319) 273-7287, 266-4457, Diane.Depken@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Distributed power could help avoid black-outs

With major power outages on the East Coast and, more recently, London, energy production and delivery is once again a hot topic. Bill Stigliani, director of the Center for Energy & Environmental Education at the University of Northern Iowa, says one solution to power outages would be to have 'distributed power' where a home or business produces its own electricity with a fuel cell, as opposed to the centralized delivery of power we have today. He says such capability is still in the future, but inroads are being made on its development.

Contacts:

Bill Stigliani, director, Center for Energy & Environmental Education, (319) 273-7150, 273-2573

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Teens in small high schools less likely to use drugs

Parents who want to steer their children away from substance abuse might do well to put them in smaller high schools. Katherine Van Wormer, professor of social work at UNI, says a new study by National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse indicates a series of factors that often lead teens to abuse drugs or alcohol. 'Ideally, a high school should have 300 to 600 kids. In the smaller schools, teachers tend to know the families, they give students more individual attention, and the students feel responsible to the teachers. They don't want to let those teachers down. I think it's a big mistake to consolidate smaller schools.'



She says other factors leading to drug/alcohol abuse include having too much extra spending money, being stressed by peer pressure, having parents who aren't involved in the child's life, and even being bored. A parent herself, van Wormer says increased parental involvement can help. 'We have to keep parents in the picture. These days, work pressures are so strong that parents often neglect the kids. Instead, they give the kids money, saying, 'Here, go buy what you need, get your own supper, take care of yourselves.' That leads to problems.'

Contact:

Katherine van Wormer, professor of social work, (319) 273-6379, Katherine.VanWormer@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A panel discussion, 'Art After 9/11,' will take place at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 11. The event, organized by Ben Powell, a graduate student in the Department of Communication, will examine artists' messages since Sept. 11, 2001.

'We'll be asking what are the implications of creating art that deals with the attacks? With remembrance of the victims? With skepticism, protest and hopes of preventing another attack,' explained Powell.

Panelists are Jay Edelnant professor of theatre; Brianne Waychoff, graduate student in Women's Studies; and Powell.

The event is free and open to the public.

September 4, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The fall schedule of classes and workshops offered by the University of Northern Iowa's Regional Business Center (RBC) has been announced. The RBC will offer training in a variety of areas, including small business skill development and introductory bookkeeping, hands-on computer software, and regulatory workshops. Classes begin in mid-September.



'OSHA's Knocking, Are You Ready?' opens the course line-up Tuesday, Sept. 16. It will help employers understand how Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations may affect their businesses. The training will be conducted by Lisa Schorzmann, of the Fort Dodge Small Business Development Center.

The RBC is partnering with Ketels Contract Training to offer a full line of hands-on Microsoft software classes. Chris McGregor-Case will teach 'Microsoft Excel,' 'Microsoft Access,' 'Outlook -- Email Strategies,' 'Outlook -- It Does More Than Email?,' 'Excel Shortcuts,' and 'Word Shortcuts.'

The RBC also is partnering with Gary Karr, CPA of Waterloo, to teach 'QuickBooks Pro, Levels 1 and 2'. The first level is for beginners. The second level will teach current QuickBooks users how to better use the software.

Other classes will become available throughout the fall. All classes will take place at the RBC, 212 E. Fourth St., Waterloo. Class sizes are limited. Fees vary. For more information, contact the UNI RBC at (319) 236-8123 or visit www.unirbc.org.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Cultural Struggles Over Human Rights: Reflections on Nigeria, India and the United States,' will be the first colloquium presentation of the year for the University of Northern Iowa Department of Geography, Wednesday, Sept. 10.

Rex Honey, professor of geography at the University of Iowa, will speak at 3 p.m., in Sabin Hall, Room 7. His presentation is the first in the series sponsored by the UNI Department of Geography.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

September 3, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Diversity includes all of us' is the theme for Diversity Week on the University of Northern Iowa campus Sunday, Sept. 7 through Friday, Sept. 12. The event will celebrate the social issues, customs and entertainment of different cultures. Daily events throughout Diversity Week include:

Sunday, Sept. 7, Charles Jefferson and New Dimension. A blend of gospel music and poetry, Lang Hall Auditorium, 4 p.m. Performers are Effie Burt, Cherie Nelson, Gabrielle Shirley, and Kei-Che Randle.

Monday, Sept. 8, UNI cultural festival. A variety of ethnic foods and information will be offered as well as the music of 'Mambo Surfers,' Maucker Union Plaza (rain site Maucker Union Old Central Ballroom), 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Sept. 9, video presentation and discussion. 'Shadow of Hate: A History of Intolerance in America,' Maucker Union Elm Room, noon.

Tuesday, Sept. 9, multicultural student panel. A discussion about the challenges and discoveries of students on the UNI campus, Maucker Union Hemisphere Lounge, 3:30 p.m.



Tuesday, Sept. 9, Diversity Week keynote speaker: Jesse Villalobos, regional director of the National Conference for Community and Justice, will speak on 'The Beauty of Diversity.' Maucker Union Old Central Ballroom, 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, Sept. 10, video presentation 'Journey to a Hate Free Millennium.' A documentary that seeks solutions to hate crimes, Maucker Union Elm Room, noon.

Wednesday, Sept. 10, international student panel. An informal discussion on the issues that international students encounter at UNI, Maucker Union Hemisphere Lounge, 3:30 p.m.

Thursday, Sept. 11, video presentation 'A Place at the Table.' A look at history and identity through the eyes of today's youth, Maucker Union Elm Room, noon.

Thursday, Sept. 11, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Association (LBGTA) panel will discuss issues affecting gay and lesbian students, Maucker Union Hemisphere Lounge, 3:30 p.m.

Thursday, Sept. 11, Reggae band 'Keith Eric & Waterhouse.' A variety of costumes, instruments, movements and stories express the culture and sounds of the Caribbean, 8 p.m., Maucker Union.

Friday, Sept. 12, Diversity Week wrap brunch. A sneak preview and spotlight on the new Center for Multicultural Education (CME) and International Student Services.

Weeklong events include the photo exhibit, 'Of Many Colors: Portraits of Multiracial Families,' in the Maucker Union Old Central Hall Lobby; and 'What Diversity Means to Me,' a chance for students to share what diversity means to them at the Maucker Union Coffeehouse.

For more information on diversity week, contact Mike Bobeldyk, Maucker Union program coordinator, at (319) 273-5888.

September 2, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Regional Business Center (RBC) will offer a beginning level of 'Quick Books Pro,' a software training course, at the center, 212 E. Fourth St., in Waterloo.

The course will run three consecutive Wednesdays, from 9 a.m. to noon, beginning Sept. 24, and will be taught by Judy Schindel, certified Quick Books trainer. These sessions are aimed specifically at beginners to the Quick Books Pro software series and those needing a refresher course. An advanced level of 'Quick Books Pro' will be offered later this fall.

There is a cost of $169 to attend the trainings. The registration deadline is Friday, Sept. 19. For more information and registration, contact the UNI RBC at (319) 236-8123, or visit www.unirbc.org.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Theatre UNI will host a director/designers' presentation for the upcoming production of Kira Obolensky's 'Lobster Alice,' at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10, in the Strayer-Wood Theatre on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

During the free, hour-long presentation, director Cynthia Goatley, UNI professor of theatre, along with props designer Mark A. Parrott, lighting designer Derek Easton, costume designer Carol Colburn and scenic designer Brad M. Carlson, will share the vision and research involved in producing the play.

Theatre UNI will present 'Lobster Alice' Oct. 9 - 19 in the Bertha Martin Theatre. Tickets go on sale at the Strayer-Wood Theatre box office on Sept. 19. For more information or to purchase tickets contact the Strayer-Wood Theatre box office at (319) 273-6381. UNI students may use their activity card to reserve a free ticket.

September 1, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's 'New Iowans' program and Iowa Public Television (IPTV), Iowa's only statewide television network, have received a $5,000 grant from the Independent Television Service (ITVS) to promote a Public Broadcasting System miniseries, 'The New Americans.' Also participating in the project is the UNI Museum.

Scheduled to begin in April 2004, 'The New Americans' is a seven-hour series about the search for the American dream through the eyes of today's immigrants and refugees, including those from Nigeria, India, the Dominican Republic, Mexico and the West Bank.

Mark Grey, director of the New Iowans program, said that through the collaboration, 'The New Americans' series will help Iowans learn more about this state's recent influx of immigrants and refugees.

Featured will be a series of activities. First will be publication of a companion handbook called 'The New Iowans' in October. The UNI Museum will present an exhibit, 'Welcoming New Iowans: A 200-Year Tradition,' in February 2004. During spring 2004, community forums will take place in Sioux City, Des Moines and Cedar Falls.

'This is a unique collaboration that will benefit all Iowans, primarily by educating them about the importance of these newcomers to the social and economic future of Iowa,' said Mary Bracken, programming and outreach coordinator of IPTV.



Established at UNI in 1999, the New Iowans program is the brainchild of Grey, who authored a book, 'Welcoming New Iowans,' to augment the program. He and co-author Anne Woodrick, UNI associate professor of anthropology, also have written a version of the book for Christian churches. Another is being written, in conjunction with UNI's Global Health Corps, for health providers. The version for businesses and employers is available on the Web at www.uni.edu/bcs/newiowans.

In 'Welcoming New Iowans,' Grey explains immigration, discusses the needs of the newcomers and community members, and talks about ways to address cultural differences and challenges.

Iowa, for a variety of reasons, has become a settling site for immigrants and refugees. First, says Grey, is the state's meat packing industry, which provides ample employment opportunities. 'Of course, they may come for those specific jobs,' Grey says, 'but they slowly and surely filter out to other kinds of employment. This is important as it demonstrates how our economy is increasingly dependent on them.'

Immigration is, says Grey, a workforce and economic development issue.

'A lot of us have looked at demographics trends and we are concerned. Birth rates are down, and the workforce is aging rapidly. And then there's the painful reminder that 40 percent of the state's college graduates leave the state. We believe that immigrants can make up for part of the shortfall.'

IPTV provides quality alternative programming that educates, enlightens and entertains viewers across the state. Nearly one million viewers each week watch IPTV, whose stations include Channel 32 Waterloo; Channel 11, Des Moines; Channel 12, Iowa City; Channel 21, Fort Dodge; Channel 24, Mason City; Channel 27, Sioux City; Channel 32, Council Bluffs; Channel 36, Red Oak; Channel 36, Davenport.

ITVS's mission is to create and present independently produced programs that engage creative risks, advance issues and represent points of view not usually seen on public or commercial television.

For more information, contact Grey at (319) 273-3029.



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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Foundation will honor Eldon Miller, former UNI head men's basketball coach and most recently a member of the UNI Foundation staff, during an event on Saturday, Sept. 20, at the UNI-Dome. Miller's wife, Dee, also will be honored.

'For nearly 20 years, Eldon and Dee Miller have had an impact on the University of Northern Iowa and the Cedar Valley,' said Bill Calhoun, vice president for advancement. 'The most recent example of Eldon's commitment to this area is the success of the fundraising efforts for the McLeod Center. With his help, we've raised more than $16 million toward our $18 million goal.'

Miller was head men's basketball coach at UNI from 1986 to 1998, amassing 568 wins. In 1990, the Panther men qualified for the NCAA Tournament; in 1996 Miller was named the Missouri Valley Coach of the year. He resigned in 1998, and took a fundraising position with the Foundation soon after.

The event also will give fans an opportunity to make a contribution to the McLeod Center in recognition of Eldon Miller. Those contributions will support construction of a plaza between the McLeod Center and the UNI-Dome, to be named in honor of the Millers.

Attending will be Terry Allen, former UNI head football coach; Jersey Jermier former UNI associate director of athletics; Randy Ayers, head coach of the Philadelphia '76ers; and members of Miller's 1990 championship team.

Tickets are $25 apiece, or $200 per table. The deadline to order tickets is Sept. 15. For more information, contact the UNI Foundation at (319) 273-6078 or www.uni-foundation.org.

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Are pre-game and half-time pep talks really effective?

It's half-time and the team heads for the locker room and the traditional pep talk from the coach. It's tradition, but is it truly effective? Paul Turman is an assistant professor of communication studies at UNI. Turman has examined coaches' communication styles and finds that while what coaches say can increase team cohesion, the wrong sort of messages can have an unexpected long-lasting effect on the motivation and self esteem of young athletes.



Contacts:

Paul Turman, assistant professor of communication studies, (319) 273 2593, 268-4045, paul.turman@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761







Silencing religious discussion in the university classroom

College and university instructors often are faced with the challenge of engaging students in conversation about controversial topics, such as religion, without silencing their beliefs. 'One of the most common and widely held interpretations of 'separation of church and state' by public institutions means no prayer, but it also tends to limit religious discussion in the classroom by both students and teachers,' said Paul Turman, assistant professor of communication studies at UNI. Turman has researched the phenomenon. Turman maintains that this interpretation results in classrooms where religious students' viewpoints are silenced, which in turn is a violation of free speech and academic freedom.

Contacts:

Paul Turman, assistant professor of communication studies, (319) 273-2593, 268-4045, paul.turman@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





College students choose spirituality over religion

Through research for a book, the head of UNI's Department of Philosophy and Religion, Betty DeBerg, found that today's college students view religion as more optional and fluid. 'I was surprised by how fluid denominational identity was among even those students who were leaders in various denominational campus ministries,' said DeBerg. 'One student came to the university a Roman Catholic, got hired as a peer minister in the ecumenical mainline Protestant campus ministry, then as a peer ministry by the Methodist Wesley Foundation. During this time, she left Catholicism for the Disciples of Christ, and decided during her senior year to go to seminary and seek ordination as a Disciple.'

The hardcover edition of that book, 'Religion on Campus,' published by the University of North Carolina Press,was released last year; the paperback edition is now available in bookstores and via Amazon.com.

Contacts:

Betty DeBerg, head, Department of Philosophy and Religion, (319) 273-6221, 277-5071, betty.deberg@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Ignorance about credit cards contributes to rising bankruptcies

The average parent knows it's important to talk with children about smoking, drugs, alcohol and even sexual responsibility. But most will forget to bring up the topic of money and fiscal responsibility.

Lois Lindell, assistant director of the Center for Economic Education at UNI, says avoiding the topic can have dire consequences. She points to the fact that personal bankruptcies are at an all-time high this year, a trend she blames on fiscal ignorance. 'Too often our children get to college with very little knowledge about how to save or set goals. They want immediate gratification. So when they get a credit card, they see little problem with maxing it out. We have to teach them that today's choices have future results.'



Contact:

Lois Lindell, assistant director of the Center for Economic Education, (319) 273-2952, 345-3514, Lois.Lindell@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

August 28, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The winners of the 2003 Iowa Energy Poster Contest, sponsored by the Iowa Energy Center and administered by the Center for Energy and Environmental Education (CEEE) at the University of Northern Iowa, will be honored at the Capitol Building in Des Moines on Monday, Sept. 8. In attendance will be the 12 winners, their parents and teachers.

In March, about 350 students throughout Iowa, in grades one through six, submitted poster designs about energy conservation and renewal to their local utility companies. The local winners were then forwarded to the state competition. Two winners were selected from each grade, and each received a $100 savings bond. The winners will receive plaques during the ceremony.

The winning posters have been compiled into a traveling display called the Traveling Energy Art Gallery. To reserve the display, call Heather Hooks, CEEE public relations director, at (319) 273-3850.

Other contributors to the Iowa Energy Poster Contest are the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, the Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities and MidAmerican Energy Holdings Co.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Careers in the Foreign Service,' a program designed to present students with an opportunity to understand foreign affairs, careers in foreign service and living abroad, will be presented at 3 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 4, on the University of Northern Iowa campus. Stanley A. Otto, the First Secretary for Economic Affairs for the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo, will speak in the State College Room of UNI's Maucker Union. His visit is sponsored by the UNI Career Center.



Otto has served as the economics officer in Germany and Nigeria, a commercial and economics officer in Japan, executive director for the Iran-American society, and as a Fulbright lecturer in Taiwan. He received his B.A. degree in romance languages from Harvard University; a master's degree in linguistics from American University in Cairo and his M.A.degree in economics from Yale. He is one of the Secretary of State's Hometown Diplomats, a program that enables U.S. Foreign Service Officers who are nominated by their Ambassadors to discuss their work overseas with domestic audiences.

For more information, contact Susan Schwieger, associate director for liberal arts and sciences at the UNI Career Center, at (319) 273-6857.

August 26, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Iowa Small Business Development Centers and Small Business Compliance Alliance will present 'OSHA's Knocking, Are You Ready?,' from 9 a.m. to noon, Tuesday, Sept. 16, at the University of Northern Iowa Regional Business Center (RBC), 212 E. Fourth St., in downtown Waterloo.

A half-day seminar appropriate for all businesses with at least one employee, the session will help employers understand how Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations may affect their businesses. Training will be conducted by Lisa Schorzmann of the Fort Dodge Small Business Development Center.

Topics will include Federal and State OSHA regulations, types of inspections and violations, penalties, record keeping, written programs, how to tell if you are having a bad inspection and the top OSHA-cited violations. Russ Gilkes from Iowa OSHA Consultation will answer questions about state regulations. The seminar is non-regulatory and confidential.

The fee is $35 per business. For more information, or to register, contact Katie MacDonald, UNI RBC program manager, at (319) 236-8123 or visit www.unirbc.org.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A Volunteer Fair to provide University of Northern Iowa students with both short-term and semester-long service opportunities within the Cedar Valley, will be held in the UNI Maucker Union Old Central Ballroom from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 3.

The annual fall event is hosted by Volunteer UNI of the UNI Career Center. More than 45 non-profit organizations are expected to attend the fair, which typically draws more than 500 students, according to Tina Heeren, a UNI senior from Akron and Volunteer UNI coordinator with the UNI Career Center.

Non-profit organizations in attendance will provide a wide range of volunteer opportunities for students and student organizations interested in social services, educational and youth services, health promotion, arts and culture, legal and judicial services, environmental and animal services, marketing and public relations services and office services.

For a complete listing of organizations in attendance, visit www.uni.edu/careercenter or contact Libby Vanderwall at (319) 273-6857.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa has named John Hess director of broadcasting services for public radio stations KUNI and KHKE. He had been serving as interim director since August 2002, following the retirement of Doug Vernier.

Hess joined the KUNI/KHKE staff as director of development in August 2000. Previously, Hess was territory sales manager with Gazette Communications in Cedar Rapids. He also worked as an account executive with Corporate Communications Consultants in West Branch and executive director of Public Access Television Inc. in Iowa City.



KUNI is heard at 90.9 FM throughout greater eastern Iowa and at 91.5 FM and 1010 AM in northern Iowa. Additional signals are heard in Des Moines at 101.7 FM, Dubuque at 98.7 FM, and the Quad Cities at 94.5 FM and 102.1 FM. KUNI audio also is available on the Internet at ww.kuniradio.org.

KHKE serves northeast Iowa at 89.5 FM, with an additional signal for Mason City and Clear Lake at 90.7 FM. KHKE audio is available online at www.khke.org.

August 24, 2003 - 7:00pm

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Blackout offers lessons on energy use

The lights are back on out East, and the waiting lines at Detroit gas stations have disappeared. But Kamyar Enshayan, program manager for the UNI Center for Energy and Environmental Education, was in Toronto when the blackouts occurred, and knows first-hand just how frustrating it was to live without electricity. He says there are serious messages to be learned from the incident. 'The main thing is that there is not an infinite supply of electricity. Electricity doesn't come from the wall. We are over-consuming and there isn't enough of it out there. The root problem is a cultural one, not a technical one.'

Enshayan says the answer is investing in renewable sources and making greater conservation efforts.



Contacts:

Kamyar Enshayan, program manager, UNI Center for Energy and Environmental Education,(319) 273-7575; kamyar.enshayan@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





UNI introduces unique training program for managers and supervisors

On Sept. 9, UNI Human Resource Services will launch a unique 'soft skills' training program for managers and supervisors called 'Soar.' A key component of Soar is a 10-session training series, dubbed 'Flight School,' which gives managers and supervisors new skills to increase their effectiveness. According to Robin Gurien, UNI training and development coordinator, this series is unlike standard training offered in the business community.

'Soar was developed at UNI for UNI staff,' said Gurien. 'Too many generic programs fall short by just dispensing information. They don't include follow up and don't stress personal accountability. UNI's program is the opposite. Follow up and accountability are cornerstones of the program. Our goal is to reinforce good techniques and change behavior where it needs to be changed.'

Contacts:

Robin Gurien, UNI training and development coordinator, (319) 273-3536, (319) 232-8787, robin.gurien@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





UNI clarifies name of arena

The University of Northern Iowa will now refer to its proposed sports-entertainment arena as the McLeod Center. Previously called the McLeodUSA Center, the project is no longer associated with the company known as McLeodUSA.

In spring 2000, Clark and Mary McLeod of Cedar Rapids made a lead gift to the project. At that time, Clark McLeod was chairman and CEO of McLeodUSA, a telecommunications service provider. He is no longer associated with that company. 'This gift was a personal commitment from the McLeods, and not the company itself,' explained Bill Calhoun, vice president for University Advancement. 'This name change reflects that fact.'

Contact:

Bill Calhoun, vice president for University Advancement, (319) 273-6078

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





FCC steps back from stopping fax communication

Last week, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced it will delay implementation of its new regulations on fax advertisements until Jan. 1, 2005. The regulations, originally scheduled to go into effect on Aug. 25, 2003, require individuals and businesses to obtain the signed written consent of any parties to which they wish to fax advertisements. The delay will give the FCC more time to consider any petitions for reconsideration and other filings that may be made on the issue.

According to Randy Hayes, UNI voice services manager, while the intent of the new FCC regulations is in the public interest, the agency forgot to look before it leapt. 'On face value these new regulations are a good thing. However, they could cause unexpected harm to non-profits, associations and organizations that routinely send faxes to their members and constituents. These rules could end up causing an even bigger mess. There's a great deal of gray area that the FCC failed to explore.'

Contacts:

Randy Hayes, UNI voice services manager, (319) 273-7473, (319) 273-7778, randal.hayes@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Jamie Schissel, a recent University of Northern Iowa graduate from Dubuque, has received a Fulbright scholarship for the 2003-2004 academic year. The grant will send her to central Germany where she will be a teaching assistant through the Padagogischer Austauschdienst (PAD) program. The PAD sends recent graduates to Germany to assist in teaching conversational English and American studies to German students of varying ages.

Schissel, who received her B.A. in German in May, begins training in Cologne, Germany on Sept. 11. She will serve as a teaching assistant for 12 hours per week. In addition to assisting in the classroom, Schissel also plans to form a conversation and culture group with the students. She says she hopes her experience in Germany will help her with further studies in linguistics and second language acquisition.

While UNI has had a number of faculty teaching in foreign countries through the Fulbright program since its inception in 1946, Ella Sweigert, UNI study abroad program coordinator, said she believes Schissel is the first UNI student to receive such an honor. She added that the Fulbright commission offers more exchanges to Germany than any other participating country. The Fulbright Program's mission is 'to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries, through the exchange of persons, knowledge and skills.'

August 21, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Native Roadside Vegetation Center (NRVC), located about one-half mile west of Hudson Road on West 27th Street, on the University of Northern Iowa campus, will be dedicated at 10:30 a.m. Friday, Aug. 29. Refreshments and building and plot production tours will follow remarks by dignitaries, including Sen. Charles Grassley and Heather Stubbe, representing Sen. Tom Harkin.

Others participating in the dedication, in addition to UNI President Robert D. Koob, include Bonnie Harper-Lore, Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation; Robert N. Downer, Board of Regents, State of Iowa; Mark Wandro, director, Iowa Department of Transportation; and, from UNI, Kichoon Yang, dean, College of Education; Daryl Smith, director, NRVC; and student Amy Carolan, junior biology major from Decorah.

The center's programs -- the Iowa Roadside Vegetation Management (IRVM)Program, Prairie Institute and Iowa Ecotype Project -- are interwoven to restore Iowa prairie and bring native grasses and flowers back to Iowa's roadsides. For almost 90 years, UNI has provided leadership in environmental education, becoming only the second higher education institution to do so, in 1915. Continuing this trend-setting, the UNI Biological Preserves System was initiated in 1973 to reconstruct native Iowa plant communities on campus and provide outdoor classrooms.

The NRVC is one more manifestation of that leading role. The center provides research, techniques, education and source-identified seed for restoration and preservation of native vegetation systems in rights-of-way and other lands.

Funding for the 10,000-square-foot center, created from renovated space in an existing campus warehouse, was provided by a federal appropriation, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA 21), with the support of Senators Charles Grassley and Tom Harkin. The University matched the appropriation with 35 acres of land near the NRVC.



The renovated building includes offices, a conference/classroom, research space and an area for native seed cleaning and handling, including a cold room for extended seed storage. An unfinished room is planned to be a native seed-testing laboratory. The TEA 21 grant also provided funds to purchase seed-cleaning equipment.

The IRVM Program, the center's oldest, grew out of Iowa Roadside Vegetation Management legislation, in 1988, that declared it to be 'in the general public welfare of Iowa and a highway purpose for the vegetation of Iowa's roadsides to be preserved, planted and maintained to be safe, visually interesting, ecologically integrated and useful for many purposes.'

In the past decade, UNI's IRVM program and the Iowa DOT's Living Roadway Trust Fund have placed Iowa at the forefront of native roadside vegetation management in the nation. Kirk Henderson heads this program that assists Iowa counties with implementation and support of IRVM programs. Eighty of Iowa's 99 counties have IRVM plans on file and 50 of them have implemented those programs. Sixty-two counties have shared $2 million in seed and planted 3,000 acres of roadsides since 1998.

The Prairie Institute is managed by Daryl Smith, NRVC director. The institute provides consultation on prairie and savanna restoration, reconstruction and management. It conducts research in prairie ecology and restoration and promotes prairie education and awareness. The institute is currently in the post-production phase of a documentary film project, 'America's Lost Landscape: The Tallgrass Prairie,' with plans for broadcast on PBS and distribution to libraries, schools and museums throughout the Midwest.

The Iowa Ecotype Project was developed to meet the need for Iowa-origin seed for prairie restorations and roadside plantings, as locally adapted native species are more likely to thrive and out-compete weedy species. Greg Houseal, program manager, and staff work with commercial native seed growers to increase the availability and affordability of Iowa source-identified seed. Seed and plant materials for seed increase and research are collected from native remnant populations across Iowa. The land provided by UNI is used for production plots to increase foundation seed. Some of the remnant seed is placed in long-term storage repository for future use as seed stock or research.

Currently, seed of 40 species and 1,800 populations in Iowa is being increased. Fifty-three ecotypes of 22 species have been released for commercial production. In 2003, licensed growers produced more than 60,000 pounds of commercial Source-Identified Iowa Ecotype Project Seed.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- From the performance program 'Voices for Change,' Saturday, Aug. 23, designed to create a safe place to talk about violence on campus, to a 'Welcome Weekend Service Project' to benefit the Cedar Valley Food Bank, scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 30, and each day in between, 'Welcome Week' on the University of Northern Iowa campus offers something for everyone.

'Voices for Change' is a thought-provoking program required for all new students, according to Mike Bobeldyk, program coordinator at UNI's Maucker Union. It will be presented by the SAVE (Students Against a Violent Environment) Forum Actors, a campus-wide interactive performance group dedicated to violence prevention at UNI. The hour-long sessions begin at 10 a.m. and 1, 3 and 5 p.m., in Schindler Education Center, Room 244-246. Students are divided into attendance groups by residence halls, and a 1 p.m. Sunday performance is scheduled for those who miss their Saturday slot.

Also, Saturday, Aug. 23, the Union Plaza will be the site for a 'BBQ Blast,' with free hotdogs, chips and pop from 4 to 7 p.m. The a cappella group 'Four Shadow' will perform from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Hypnotist Jim Wand will perform at both 8 and 10 p.m. in the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center Great Hall.

UNI President Robert Koob will preside over Sunday's 4 p.m. Convocation, also in the GBPAC's Great Hall, welcoming new students to the 2003-2004 academic year. At 5 p.m., the Panther Bash will offer free food, prizes and fun on the lawn across from the GBPAC. A welcome reception for new and returning international students, with a traditional country roll call, will take place in the Great Hall, beginning at 7:30 p.m.

Weekday activities include:

Monday, Aug. 25 -- Welcome Back Cookout Under the Tent, 5-6:30 p.m., Center for Multicultural Education South Lawn.

Tuesday, Aug. 26 -- Information tables about various student organizations and activities will be set up in Maucker Union from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Wednesday, Aug. 27 -- The Quads-- Hagemann, Shull, Noehren and Rider Residence Halls-- will hold a dance, beginning at 9 p.m.

Thursday, Aug. 28 -- A 'drive-in movie,' featuring 'The Matrix Reloaded,' is scheduled for 9 p.m. in the Quads Courtyard. Students are asked to bring a blanket. Free snacks and refreshments will be provided. Rain location is Maucker Union.

Friday, Aug. 29 -- A 'Beach Bash' will be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., on Lawther Field. Free food, sno-cones, inflatable activities and much more are scheduled. Rain date is Sept. 5.

Students can sign-up at activities throughout the week, or at the Student Activities Office in the Student Services Center, Room 103 Bartlett Hall, to help the Cedar Valley Food Bank, as this year's Welcome Weekend Service Project. Participants will receive a free t-shirt and lunch, and transportation will be provided. For more information, call (319) 273-2783.

Sponsors for the week's events include the UNI Women's Studies Program, Maucker Union, Student Life Team, UNI Convocation Committee, UNI Alumni Association, International Student Services, Center for Multicultural Education, Student Activities, Quad Residence System and B.A.S.I.C. (Brothers and Sisters in Christ).

UNI classes begin at 8 a.m. Monday, Aug. 25.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Native Roadside Vegetation Center (NRVC), located about one-half mile west of Hudson Road on West 27th Street, on the University of Northern Iowa campus, will be dedicated at 10:30 a.m. Friday, Aug. 29. Refreshments and building and plot production tours will follow remarks by dignitaries, including Sen. Charles Grassley and Heather Stubbe, representing Sen. Tom Harkin.

Others participating in the dedication, in addition to UNI President Robert D. Koob, include Bonnie Harper-Lore, Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation; Robert N. Downer, Board of Regents, State of Iowa; Mark Wandro, director, Iowa Department of Transportation; and, from UNI, Kichoon Yang, dean, College of Natural Sciences; Daryl Smith, director, NRVC; and student Amy Carolan, junior biology major from Decorah.

The center's programs -- the Iowa Roadside Vegetation Management (IRVM)Program, Prairie Institute and Iowa Ecotype Project -- are interwoven to restore Iowa prairie and bring native grasses and flowers back to Iowa's roadsides. For almost 90 years, UNI has provided leadership in environmental education, becoming only the second higher education institution to do so, in 1915. Continuing this trend-setting, the UNI Biological Preserves System was initiated in 1973 to reconstruct native Iowa plant communities on campus and provide outdoor classrooms.



The NRVC is one more manifestation of that leading role. The center provides research, techniques, education and source-identified seed for restoration and preservation of native vegetation systems in rights-of-way and other lands.

Funding for the 10,000-square-foot center, created from renovated space in an existing campus warehouse, was provided by a federal appropriation, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA 21), with the support of Senators Charles Grassley and Tom Harkin. The University matched the appropriation with 35 acres of land near the NRVC.

The renovated building includes offices, a conference/classroom, research space and an area for native seed cleaning and handling, including a cold room for extended seed storage. An unfinished room is planned to be a native seed-testing laboratory. The TEA 21 grant also provided funds to purchase seed-cleaning equipment.

The IRVM Program, the center's oldest, grew out of Iowa Roadside Vegetation Management legislation, in 1988, that declared it to be 'in the general public welfare of Iowa and a highway purpose for the vegetation of Iowa's roadsides to be preserved, planted and maintained to be safe, visually interesting, ecologically integrated and useful for many purposes.'

In the past decade, UNI's IRVM program and the Iowa DOT's Living Roadway Trust Fund have placed Iowa at the forefront of native roadside vegetation management in the nation. Kirk Henderson heads this program that assists Iowa counties with implementation and support of IRVM programs. Eighty of Iowa's 99 counties have IRVM plans on file and 50 of them have implemented those programs. Sixty-two counties have shared $2 million in seed and planted 3,000 acres of roadsides since 1998.



The Prairie Institute is managed by Daryl Smith, NRVC director. The institute provides consultation on prairie and savanna restoration, reconstruction and management. It conducts research in prairie ecology and restoration and promotes prairie education and awareness. The institute is currently in the post-production phase of a documentary film project, 'America's Lost Landscape: The Tallgrass Prairie,' with plans for broadcast on PBS and distribution to libraries, schools and museums throughout the Midwest.

The Iowa Ecotype Project was developed to meet the need for Iowa-origin seed for prairie restorations and roadside plantings, as locally adapted native species are more likely to thrive and out-compete weedy species. Greg Houseal, program manager, and staff work with commercial native seed growers to increase the availability and affordability of Iowa source-identified seed. Seed and plant materials for seed increase and research are collected from native remnant populations across Iowa. The land provided by UNI is used for production plots to increase foundation seed. Some of the remnant seed is placed in long-term storage repository for future use as seed stock or research.



Currently, seed of 40 species and 1,800 populations in Iowa is being increased. Fifty-three ecotypes of 22 species have been released for commercial production. In 2003, licensed growers produced more than 60,000 pounds of commercial Source-Identified Iowa Ecotype Project Seed.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- For the seventh consecutive year, the University of Northern Iowa is ranked second in the 'Midwestern Universities -- Master's' category for public universities, according to U.S. News & World Report's 2004 'America's Best Colleges' guidebook.

The magazine's ranking criteria include peer assessment, academic reputation, retention, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, graduation rate performance, and alumni giving rate.

UNI also ranked in the top tier of a combined list of public and private Midwest regional universities.

Both the weekly edition of U.S. News containing the college rankings and the newsstand book, America's Best Colleges, will hit newsstands on Monday, Aug. 25

Truman State University in Missouri was ranked first among public institutions in the 'Midwest Universities -- Master's' category, also for the seventh consecutive year.

August 20, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Malcolm Price Lab School (PLS) and Northern University High School (NUHS) will celebrate the beginning of the 2003-2004 school year with an open house on Tuesday, Aug. 26.

The event begins at 5 p.m., with classrooms open, teachers on hand, and a PLS scavenger hunt. At 5:30 p.m., the school's boosters will offer meals for sale, and at 6:15 p.m. the falls sports and activities kick-off begins. Guest speaker is Mark Farley, UNI head football coach.

On hand during the events will be Jeffrey Cornett, the recently appointed dean of the College of Education. The public may attend.

August 19, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Department of Earth Science will celebrate a once in a lifetime opportunity when Mars will be the closest it has been to Earth in 60,000 years. The department will open the Hillside Observatory to the public at 9 p.m., Wednesday Aug. 27, for a chance to see the red planet through the observatory's 16-inch telescope.

UNI professor of astronomy Siobahn Morgan says the relatively close position of Mars allows astronomers to observe the planet in greater detail for a long period of time. One area they will be able to learn more about is the weather on Mars.

'Having Mars very close to the Earth allows for thorough observations of the atmosphere on a much larger scale, allowing planetary scientists the chance to gather a significant amount of data on Martian weather,' said Morgan.

The Hillside Observatory is located on Jennings Drive in Cedar Falls. In the case of bad weather, the event will be cancelled. Mars will be visible throughout the fall and winter, and the observatory in McCollum Hall on campus is open to the public every Thursday night. The next time Mars will be this close to Earth will be in about 280 years.

August 18, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Students moving into the 10 residence halls at the University of Northern Iowa will get help from UNI students, faculty and staff, Thursday through Saturday, Aug. 21-23. The UNI Move-In Crew members will be wearing bright blue T-shirts with this year's theme, 'Groovin' Move-In,' printed on them.

The Move-In Crew will be working on Thursday, Aug. 21, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Friday, Aug. 22, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Saturday, Aug. 23, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Classes for UNI's 2003 fall semester begin at 8 a.m., Monday, Aug. 25. For more information about the Move-In Crew, contact James Barnes, Move-In Crew coordinator, at (319) 415-5699 or (319) 273-7063.

Note: to obtain a list of the students, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

August 17, 2003 - 7:00pm

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'American Bandstand' marks 46th anniversary

American Bandstand made its television premiere in August 1957, changing forever the way popular music would be marketed. The show and Dick Clark, its host for 30 years, are part of American culture. The hour-long show was not only TV's longest running musical series, but also the first one to focus on rock and roll. According to Chris Martin, UNI associate professor of communication studies, Bandstand defined the form. 'American Bandstand was the first TV show to offer a visual representation of music,' said Martin. 'Shows such as MTV's 'Total Request Live' are direct descendants of 'American Bandstand'.'

Contacts:

Chris Martin, associate professor of communication studies, (319) 273-2788, (319) 277-2991, christopher.martin@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Sports and parents sometimes make for a volatile mix



Over the past few years, national youth sports leagues have reported regular incidents of fights or abusive behavior involving parents or coaches. The unfortunate trend has even hit the local sports scene, where parents of youth baseball players recently clashed during a game. Roberto Clemente, associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling and Postsecondary Education at the University of Northern Iowa, says these attitudes have roots in professional sports. 'Almost every type and level of professional sports offers numerous examples of our multi-million dollar heroes using profanity, hitting fellow players and attacking referees. We see it on live TV and repeated endlessly on sports shows.'

What happens then, he says, is that sports fans -- parents included -- internalize and later imitate the actions. 'Why not? They've seen their heroes applauded, admired and well-paid despite violent actions and poor sportsmanship.'

Contacts:

Roberto Clemente, associate professor, Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling and Postsecondary Education, (319) 273-3362, 296-2858, roberto.clemente@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Close encounter from Mars

Chances are you missed the last time Mars was this close to the Earth: it happened 60,000 years ago. And if you miss it this time, you'll have to wait another 280 years. Starting in August and extending through the winter, the red planet will be on the part of its orbit that is closest to Earth. Siobahn Morgan, professor of astronomy at the University of Northern Iowa, says the relatively close position of Mars allows astronomers to observe the planet in greater detail for a long period of time. 'Having Mars very close to the Earth allows for thorough observations of the atmosphere on a much larger scale, allowing planetary scientists the chance to gather a significant amount of data on Martian weather.'

Morgan says next to the moon, Mars will be the brightest object in the night sky. In August, it will be in the southeast corner of the sky around midnight, and as the month progresses, it will be visible earlier and earlier due south.

Contacts:

Siobahn Morgan, professor of astronomy, (319) 273-2389, or 273-2759; or Siobahn.Morgan@uni.edu

Vicki Grimes, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Maucker Union will re-open for business on Friday, Aug. 22. Closed since May, Maucker Union has remodeled 20,000 square feet and is adding an additional 42,000 square feet. The project also includes new housing for the university's Center for Multicultural Education, now located at the Union. The CME will officially open later this fall.

The Union now features a coffee bar called Chat's, where gourmet coffee, bakery items and Freshen's Smoothies and Premium Yogurt will be available; new and renovated meeting rooms; and handicapped-accessible entrances.

Temporary food service will be in the Union's Old Central Ballroom, previously known as the Expansion. Additional food services will open later in the year in Prexy's Court. They are Avanti, featuring pizza and pasta, Flare's with grilled items, Wasabi serving international foods, and Blimpie's sub sandwiches. A grand-opening ceremony for this area will take place later this year.

Jan Hanish, director of Maucker Union, noted that when construction is complete, the Union also will have a new retail outlet area. 'This will be an expanded retail area with snacks, candy, school supplies, magazines, newspapers, logowear, gifts and greeting cards,' she explained. 'In addition, on the upper level, we will have new space for International Services, Northern Iowa Student Government, student organizations, and student activities.'

Maucker Union was constructed in 1969, as the University Union. It was renamed in 1974, to honor J.W. Maucker, UNI president from 1950 to 1970. In 1990, the multi-purpose Expansion was completed. The most recent addition and renovation began in spring 2002, and was funded exclusively through student fees, at a cost of $13 million.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- By the end of the week, some 3,800 students are expected to be moved into their rooms in the 10 residence halls on the University of Northern Iowa campus. Along with parents and family members, they will get help from more than 100 students who have signed on as part of the move-in crew that will provide assistance Thursday through Saturday, Aug. 21-23.

Lyn Redington, UNI associate director of residence, says a number of new programs this year have also proved popular and are bringing students into the halls ahead of the regular schedule. About 300 first-year students directly from high school signed up for the new 'Springboard' program designed to help develop them into a cohesive community. They will be living in Hagemann, Noehren and Campbell Halls and arrive on campus Wednesday, Aug. 20, with a kick-off dinner with UNI president, Robert Koob, scheduled that evening. Special events on Thursday will welcome them to the campus and provide them with extra resources to make a smoother transition to the residence system and college.

Also, Redington says 430 students have chosen to participate in UNI's recently-approved 'Two-Year Advantage' pilot program that allows students living in the residence halls to receive the same dining/housing rate for the first and second years of their contracts. Among other benefits, this plan also allows them to move into the halls Thursday with no additional fee.

A new parking system, 'CP' for C-preferred, designates about 800 parking places closest to the residence halls for students who are returning for at least a second year in the halls. Other changes in the residence system include the re-opening of Campbell Dining Center for weekday lunches and dinners while the Towers Dining Center is closed for renovations, and a new window and carpeting project throughout the fall for units in the College Courts family housing area that is expected to help residents significantly lower their utility costs.

August 14, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Scholarships have been awarded to 23 minority students who will begin their studies this fall at the University of Northern Iowa.

___(Name)___ of ___(Address/Hometown)___, will receive a ___(scholarship name)___ scholarship.

Multicultural Achievement and Talent Scholarships are based on a formula using several criteria, including rank in class, ACT, GPA and financial need. They range in value from $200 to $1,500, and are renewable for three years with a 2.75 GPA or above.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The UNI Gallery of Art will present the 'David Delafield Retrospective' in the Kamerick Art Building from Aug. 25 through Sept. 19. UNI professor of art and exhibition curator Roy Behrens will present a lecture at 7 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 4, in the Art Auditorium (Room 111), and an opening reception will follow.

David Delafield, UNI emeritus professor of art, 'is a man who has worn many hats in his career: artist, professor, puppeteer, husband and father, and World War II bombardier,' said Behrens. 'Among his many distinctions are his time spent as a student of preeminent painter Hans Hoffman and gestalt theory proponent Hoyt Sherman, as well as a stint as an identification sketcher for the Cedar Falls Police Department. His works of art may be found throughout the Waterloo/Cedar Falls communities.'

The exhibition, lecture, and opening reception are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday; and, noon to 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. The gallery is located at the corner of Hudson Road and West 27th Street, on the main floor of the Kamerick Art Building. For more information, call (319) 273-3095 or visit www.uni.edu/artdept/gallery/



This retrospective, sponsored in part by a grant from the Community Foundation, is a collaboration that includes the Hearst Center for the Arts and the Waterloo Center for the Arts where artworks by David Delafield are currently on view. The Hearst Center for the Arts will present a 'Community Portrait,' from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 3.

On Saturday, Sept. 6, all three arts centers will host a Progressive Gala that begins with wine and hors d'oeurves, from 6 to 7 p.m., at the Hearst Center for the Arts, followed by a gourmet dinner at the UNI Gallery of Art, from 7:15 to 8:45 p.m.; and desserts, cocktails, and dancing at the Waterloo Center for the Arts from 9 to 11 p.m. For reservations, tickets, and further details on the gala, contact the Waterloo Center for the Arts at 291-4490, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Tuesday through Friday.

August 13, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa was the only educational institution in a six-state Midwest region to receive the 2002-03 Award of Excellence from the Association for Career and Technical Education, Region 3.

The award was given in recognition of UNI's collaborative efforts with community colleges, including articulation agreements. Articulation agreements mesh programs between two-year and four-year schools so that students can transfer credits earned at one institution to the other.

Accepting the award on behalf of UNI was Charles Johnson, professor of industrial technology, who has been instrumental in formulating articulation agreements with Iowa community colleges. About 300 articulation agreements have been signed with all 15 community colleges in the state. The majority of these program-to-program agreements enable graduates of technical programs at the community colleges to make a smooth transition toward completion of a major at UNI.

The award, a plaque, was presented at the group's annual conference held in Dubuque in June. Rockwell Collins in Cedar Rapids was the only business to receive the award in Region 3.

August 10, 2003 - 7:00pm

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Will rising Muslim birth rate impact future governments?



Some in Israel have expressed concern that Palestinian and Muslim birth rates are rising, while the Israeli fertility rate is dropping significantly, thus raising questions about the future population's influence on the politics of the region. Dhirendra Vajpeyi, professor of political science at the University of Northern Iowa, says while a significant number of Palestinians are Christian, the majority are Muslim, and the political ramifications could be significant. 'If you look at fertility rates of Muslims all over the world, compared to those of other religions, the Muslim rate is highest,' he says, adding that similar concerns have been expressed in other countries, including India where every religious group's birth rate is going down, except for Muslims'. Does this imbalance in population growth mean more political upheaval for the future?

Contacts:

Dhirendra Vajpeyi, professor of political science, (319) 273-2275, 273-2039

Vicki Grimes, Office of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761



To download or not to download

University students across the country have been sued after downloading and sharing other copyrighted files from the Internet With the advent of the Digital Millennium Act, U.S. colleges and universities are scrambling to put into place polices that protect students' rights and inform them of their responsibilities and liabilities under the law. 'Like most institutions, UNI already had policies and procedures regarding respect for copyright law and acceptable use of network resources,' explains Steve Moon, director of network services at UNI. 'But we have had to put in place automated procedures for dealing with the weekly complaints, scale up our efforts to communicate with our users regarding their responsibilities and liabilities, and change language to specifically include MP3 and MPEG files and references to peer-to-peer file sharing programs and their dangers.' Moon says access to the Internet doesn't change an individual's responsibility to respect the property rights of others.

Contacts:

Steve Moon, director, UNI network services, (319) 273-6813, (319) 277-1390 steve.moon@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Choosing a daycare center

Almost every parent struggles, at one time or another, with the issue of daycare. Many worry about leaving their children in the care of others, and many more are concerned about the effect of all-day care by a non-parent. If you do your homework, says Rheta DeVries, director of the Regents Center for Early Developmental Education at the University of Northern Iowa, there's really little reason to worry.

'I don't think we should conclude that day care is bad for childrenï¾—but that bad day care is bad for children,' she says. 'Research has shown that the single most distinguishing characteristic that defines good day care is that the teachers have had training in child development.'

Contacts:

Rheta DeVries, director, Regents Center for Early Development Education, (319) 232-1958, rheta.devries@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Scholarships have been awarded to 55 transfer students who will begin their studies this fall on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

___(Name)___ of ___(Address/Hometown)___, will receive a ___(scholarship name)___ scholarship.

Transfer achievement scholarships are based on a combination of rank in class and financial need. They range in value from $200 to $1,000, and are renewable for a second year.

The Phi Theta Kappa scholarship is available to students who are members of this honorary society at the community college from which they are transferring. A GPA of 3.5 or above is required and recipients must demonstrate leadership and involvement in their campus or community. The two-year scholarship is worth $1,000 per year for Iowa residents, and ranges from $1,000 to $2,000 per year for non-residents.

The Transfer Multicultural Achievement and Talent Scholarship is awarded to incoming ethnic- minority transfer students based on a formula using GPA and financial need. They range in value from $200 to $1,000, and are renewable for a second year with a 2.75 GPA or above.

The Clyde & Grace Sanborn Scholarship is presented to students transferring to UNI from Iowa Lakes Community College in Estherville. Students must be enrolled fulltime, in good academic standing, possess leadership and citizenship qualities and demonstrate financial need. The scholarship is renewable with a 3.0 GPA.

The Fleming Sisters Scholarship is awarded to elementary or secondary education majors. The $1,000 award is available for residents of Tama or Benton County, Iowa and is based on financial need. The scholarship is renewable with a satisfactory GPA.

The Mapes Education Scholarship is awarded on the basis of financial need or exemplary academic performance to a student pursuing a teacher education-related program of study. It is a one-year scholarship and varies in amount each year.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

August 7, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa senior biology major Katie Venter of Oskaloosa and UNI assistant professor of health education Catherine Zeman spent a week in June in the Transylvania region of Romania as part of a student research program funded by the UNI Environmental Health Initiative.

The project, called the 2003 Research Project and Student Training Experience in Drinking Water and Pesticide Exposure Evaluation, involved testing water samples in Transylvania for the harmful pesticide DDT. Previous research conducted by Zeman and her Romanian colleagues found that contaminated water in Transylvania puts children who drink it at risk for developmental complications of fine motor coordination and learning.



The purpose of this year's research was to determine the level of DDT in the water supply using a method called gas chromatography. Venter worked with Romanian chemists and toxicologists from the Romanian Institute of Public Health, learning their water analysis methods and comparing them to the American method.

'This experience offered me the opportunity to understand and experience the challenges that colleagues in other cultural settings must face when implementing and designing a public health program,' said Venter. 'This has been one of the greatest experiences of my academic career.'

The results and exposure models that Venter, Zeman and their colleagues were working on are still in the process of being completed.

August 4, 2003 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- More than 750 incoming freshmen at the University of Northern Iowa have been awarded freshmen achievement scholarships based on a combination of their rank in class and financial need.



The scholarships range in value from $200 to $1,500, and are renewable for a second year with a 3.0 GPA or above.

___(Name)___ of ___(Hometown)___, a 2003 high school graduate, will receive a scholarship.

Note: to obtain a list of the scholarship winners, please contact the Office of University Marketing and Public Relations at 319-273-2761.

August 3, 2003 - 7:00pm

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Justice vs. freedom of the press

The judge in the Kobe Bryant case has threatened reporters who dare print the name of the alleged victim, saying he won't allow them into the courtroom. Media outlets have cried foul, and are suing for the right to use the young woman's name. Julie Thompson, sexual/substance abuse coordinator at UNI, says there are very good reasons for keeping secret the names of rape victims while an investigation is pending. 'Once the name is revealed, victims are often harassed or stalked. And there's still a great deal of shame and humiliation involved with a sexual assault. Coming forward in the first place is very difficult, even when the name is shielded. Of course, it shouldn't be that way -- the shame should be on the one who committed the assault.'

Thompson says society has a long way to go in helping victims feel less shame about an assault. But she has some ideas about what needs to be changed. 'Look at the language we use when talking about a sexual assault; it's passive. We say 'she was raped' and not 'he raped her.' We have to stop asking questions that give the implication the victim is responsible. And we also have to let go of the idea that it couldn't have been rape if the involved parties knew one another.'

Contact

Julie Thompson, sexual/substance abuse coordinator, (319) 989-2061, Julie.Thompson@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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UNI professor says voting is a choice

The 38th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 is Wednesday, Aug. 6. The act was passed to ensure access to the ballot for all citizens, but statistics show that a large portion of today's U.S. population simply does not vote. That's not necessarily a bad thing, says Tom Rice, head of UNI's Department of Political Science. He says it's important for children to learn about the democratic process, and to understand that they have the right to vote. But demanding that everyone vote doesn't help the democratic process and could, says Rice, hinder it. 'What you end up with is a large number of votes from people who don't understand the issues or the candidates,' he explains. 'I'm not sure that's what we want.''

Contact:

Tom Rice, head, Department of Political Science, 218-732-8335, tom.rice@uni.edu, pinehavenbeach@hotmail.com

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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Watergate anniversary

On Aug. 8, 1974, Richard Nixon became the first U.S. president to resign from office. Plagued by the Watergate scandal, Nixon was facing imminent impeachment and possible removal from office. It was a turbulent time, but John Johnson, professor of history, said some good things emerged from what was probably the greatest political scandal in American history. 'In the long run, the rule of law triumphed. The Constitution prevailed. We had a governmental change without upheaval. Initial American anger and cynicism over Richard Nixon's actions and statements have receded in the last generation, and the accomplishments and shortcomings of the Nixon administration can now be seen in a broader historical perspective.'

In 1974, Johnson was critical of President Gerald Ford's pardon of Nixon. Now he believes the pardon was a wise course of action, sparing the country further trauma from Watergate. 'I think President Ford was right: It was time for us to stop wallowing in Watergate; the country needed to get on with other business.'

Contact:

John Johnson, professor of history, (319) 273-2097, 277-7130, John.Johnson@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations

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