Faculty You Should Know: Doris Corbett

Doris Corbett has never seen so much purple and gold. Certainly it's a far cry from the blue and white she is used to seeing at her previous university. Corbett began her position as director and professor of UNI's School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services (HPELS) in July 2012.

Since that time she has met with hundreds of people including faculty, staff and students who are passionate about improving the quality of life for humankind particularly as it relates to health, fitness, wellness and environmental issues from cradle to grave.

"As educators, we have a responsibility to make a difference in the lives of our students to ensure they have the skills and knowledge to practice a healthy and fit lifestyle."

She quotes philosopher Herbert Spencer, "Preservation of health is a duty and that few people are conscious of such a thing as physical morality." As director of HPELS she adds, "Ignoring health is easy when you are healthy. As educators, we have a responsibility to make a difference in the lives of our students to ensure they have the skills and knowledge to practice a healthy and fit lifestyle."

In her position, she oversees four divisions in athletic training, health promotion and education, leisure, youth and human services and physical education. She believes UNI students get to work with some of the best faculty in the field when it comes to health and physical education, non-profit work, environmental outreach, global health, tourism and more.

Her passion for education runs in the family. She grew up surrounded by educators. Her twin sister is vice president of academic affairs at a college in Florida.

Her love for academics can be seen in her passion for research. She is interested in studying human rights and social justice issues related to sports. Her recent research has focused on both African-American women in the sport and physical activity culture during slavery and Middle-Eastern women in sport.

"It is believed that good research and quality teaching is important in the academic community, but unless one is capable of interpreting the literature, communicating the research findings to the academic community and the public at large, we have failed to complete the process," says Corbett.

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